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Entry practices and privacy

23 days ago

Tell us what you think:

  • What is your experience of entry to rental properties in Queensland?
  • How balanced are rights of entry and rights to privacy in Queensland rental properties?
  • What do you think are reasonable periods and reasons for entry to a rental property?
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  • Jkel about 10 hours ago
  • Dirst 21 days ago
    3 monthly inspections for long term tenants are invasive. After an initial probationary period....say 12 months.. routine inspections should change to 6monthly. We have an on-site manager who we see almost everyday and can come knock on your door if he wanted to which is fine as we look after our property so I dont know why we have to have a compulsory three month walk through.
  • Jan1147 12 days ago
    1. If no agent is involved, a landlord seems to ignore the rules and violates entry protocol.2. No issues provided rules are abided by.3. Inspections every 3 months is intrusive especially when there are no problems with the tenant looking after the property.
  • Shellz 8 days ago
    Our rental property is for sale and it is like living in a fishbowl/shop front window, whilst paying full price for the privilege, and being intimidated and bullied into the bargain. I have jokingly said I may as well put up a McDonald's sign that says open all hours as we have absolutely NO Quiet Enjoyment, NO Privacy, are expected to keep the place like a show home all the time, and have a Real Estate Agent that doesn't follow the RTA Regulations whatsoever, turns up unannounced, unlawfully enters our driveway and drives around our house to show perspective buyers without consent or even any form of notice anytime he wishes, speaks to us and treats us with utter contempt, hasn't given us 24 hours notice or a Form 9 entry notice filled in correctly with the number of people attending the sales inspection, bullies, harasses and tries to intimidate us by saying he will enter whether we agree to the day and time or not. I am a retired Prison Officer and Criminals get treated better than we have been. We have ALWAYS done the right thing entirely, paid our rent in advance, often an extra couple of weeks in advance, NEVER been late and respect the properties we have rented as if they are our own, keep the property as clean and tidy as humanly possible and have only ever had one other horror of a Real Estate Agent in 32 years of renting properties. We have just had to put this Real Estate Agent in Breach and issue a Form 11 yesterday on several of these grounds, and was told by the RTA to call Police should this Agent try to bully us and force his way into our rental property. Living here in fear of constant home invasions is appalling, and we are more than stressed and have lost hours of time, as it has taken phone calls to RTA, phone calls to the Police, sms messages and phone calls to this totally disrespectful Mafia like Agent (who Manages the rental as well as has it listed for sale) several emails to this Agent, filing out a Form 11 Breach Form and having to email it late yesterday (yes, late on a Friday afternoon). Now we expect to have to fight this further through RTA and QCat, and expect to receive a retaliatory eviction notice, all because he wants to sell the property and doesn't give a damn about how he treats us in the process. This system is not at all fair, and as Tenants we are the ones that have to fight for our lives, our rights and prove that this disgusting excuse for a human being is in the wrong? Try doing this when you have a Husband with chronic, severe PTSD and you are also suffering severe debilitating health issues. If we could afford to get a Mortgage we would, in fact at the moment living on the streets would afford us better privacy and quiet enjoyment. I wish someone at RTA would finally have the guts to put into law and decide what the word reasonable means when it comes to the number and frequency of sales inspections for a start. We have tried to be more than reasonable with making times for sales inspections, however he seems to believe that he can do whatever the hell he wants. We asked if this place was likely to be put up for sale when we were looking to rent it 10 months ago, and was told no, they are investors as it is a company and they are not likely to sell for years. Wish we had never laid eyes on the place. This has cost us both financially (moving costs, installation of NBN etc) and definitely has taken a toll on our physical and mental health, yet we have to fight just to be treated fairly? The system really needs to change dramatically, as currently tenants appear to have NO rights whatsoever, not even human rights.
    • Van 8 days ago
      I'm so sorry you've had to put up with this. I have been through three sales as a renter, including two at the same property. Every time it's been tremendously stressful and I felt like I was being treated with contempt by the selling agent, although nowhere near as badly as you are. I think tenants should be compensated if a property is up for sale, especially if it doesn't sell within a specified period of time. I also think the legislation needs to clarify what agents are allowed to do when it comes to entering the property to show prospective buyers around. At the moment there is no clarity on what the legal boundaries actually are.
    • Emmadeanne 8 days ago
      Shellz this an awful situation. As a property manager I have had to deal with selling agents and while most are respectful of tenants' rights some are not. I suspect it depends on how much pressure the owner is putting on the agent to get a buyer or perhaps some people are just plain inconsiderate and ignorant. However I must admit I have never come across an agent who behaves as badly as the one you are having to deal with. Maybe this is because I am the property manager not the selling agent as well. As you say the problem lies within the act as is only says inspections must take place at reasonable times and that there must be a reasonable time between inspections. I hate the term reasonable. Reasonableness is a slippery concept and what is reasonable to you may not be reasonable to me. I believe the act needs to clearly state how many inspections per week are allowed and how much time should elapse between inspections unless all parties agree otherwise in writing. I know owners sometimes reduce the rent while the property is for sale in consideration of the inconvenience caused to tenants by inspections. One owner whose property I managed reduced the rent $100 per week although this amount is unusual. This is an area of the act that really needs review. Owners do have a right to sell their property. I would never tell a tenant that the owner had no intention of selling because an owner's circumstances can change in a couple months making a sale necessary but everyone's rights must be laid out in law. This area of the act needs urgent attention.
      • Van 8 days ago
        I agree, Emmadeanne. "Reasonable" can mean anything. It needs to be clarified, and "reasonable" actually needs to be reasonable.I do understand that sometimes owners need to sell their properties, but I think it needs to be done with all consideration that the property is someone's home, not just an asset to be sold. I have had an agent come with no notice at dinner time to show my rental to prospective buyers. Those same agents moved my property around to take photos without permission and put those photos in advertisements, again without permission. In another case, the first I heard of the property being for sale was the "For Sale" sign in the front yard. It was a difficult property to sell because there was a problem with it, so it was on the market for months both times it went up for sale. I think I lived there for about three years. I reckon the place was up for sale for nine months of that time. I was offered no compensation for the inconvenience.
      • Angela Ballard 7 days ago
        Stipulating can be just as problematic as the ambiguous term 'reasonable'. I suggest a mix of both. By that I mean one window of 1-2 hours per week AND a negotiated compensation of a decrease in rent ($50 or $100) per week per entry with notice. Yes, owners have the right to sell their property but they should not have the right to interfere with the lives and homes of people living there beyond what's reasonable for the people living there. If an agent and/or owner has deceived renters to take on a place under certain understandings (no plans to sell for 12 months for example...and get that in writing!) then the proprietary interests should cop the financial disadvantage if they want to change course. This financial penalty and compensation would encourage more honesty and fairness.
    • JaniceAC 7 days ago
      I don’t believe it is a requirement to put the number of people entering to inspect a property that is for sale and it shouldn’t be. The owner if the property probably had no intention of selling the property 20 months ago but personal circumstances change. If a property is pjafed for sale during a tenancy I believe the tenant should be able to vacate by giving the agent 2 weeks notice.
    • unhappy renter 7 days ago
      Gosh! this agent sounds like he works for the same one managing my property! I absolutely agree it's high time the RTA were given some teeth in order to prevent the bullying and disregard for tenants rights.
    • foxje 1 day ago
      What a terrible story. Wth respect, however, I am not sure the system needs to be changed as nearly everything the agent did was illegal. Perhaps better compliance and penalties?
  • NS1968 11 days ago
    I have had a real estate agent / property manager insist on inspecting a rental property every three months, on the dot, over four years of renting the same house. The house was kept in impeccable order (we were awarded a 'tidy tenant' award for being their 'best tenant'). The agency/agent flat REFUSED to EVER renegotiate inspection times so that I could be there, and always let themselves in with their own key. Occasionally, they moved things, left cupboard doors open (doors to my own furniture, not built-ins), and on two occasions helped themselves to food from the kitchen (fruit from the fruit bowl on one occasion, and a slice of cake on another). Several times they failed to properly lock the front door when leaving the property after inspection.In addition, without my consent or knowledge, they photographed the interior of my home and posted these images on their social media WITHOUT any consultation/without my consent. Although this was ostensibly to promote how wonderful their tenant/s are, I did not appreciate the violation of my right to privacy, or their lack of discretion.I think, as many have already said, that while regular inspections for structural and maintenance purposes are necessary, three-monthly inspections are excessive over a long tenancy. I agree that more regular inspections on first moving in (say, in the first year) can establish a tenant's level of care of the home, and after that can be less regular (say, annual).
    • Angela Ballard 10 days ago
      Wow. Your rental tale speak volumes about the 'proprietariness' - the sense of entitlement based in a proprietary interest - in the private rental system here. What most people, including policy and advocacy folks fail to acknowledge is that the system is inherently skewed towards those interests because there are two sets of these...the agent and the property owner, as opposed to the one, other party, the renters. So its kind of 2/3s to 1/3 at the starting gate. We as a polity cannot adequately ensure that agents and owners will do the decent thing in part because there is no, easy financial penalty, whereas tenants will lose bond for the slightest of reasons because 'bond gouging' has become part of the business model for some, unregulated parties. I know investors and agents are up in arms about the possibility of even pretty minor changes to make rental life more like an ordinary home/life but really, this tale (like so may I captured in the 'renters at home' research) captures the social complexity of poor attitudes and behaviours that need to be addressed in ways that shift the culture of the system towards a normal home life for renters, especially once their bonafides, have been well established. Seeing legislation and regulation (without simple and effective compliance measures that don't impact on renters' daily lives too much) as the solution suggests an incomplete understanding of the social complexity of the problem
    • Emmadeanne 10 days ago
      If these allegations can be proved this agent's behaviour was despicable and should have been reported not only the principal of the agency involved but to the RTA. This type of behaviour gets good agents and onsite managers a bad reputation. I will always negotiate a suitable time for an inspection with a tenant so they can be present if they wish. In fact I would prefer a tenant to be home for the inspection not only to discuss any problems but so I am not going to be accused of any wrong doing. The issue of sending photographs to an owner is a cloudy to say the least. Most owners of the properties I manage live interstate so like photographs so they can at least see their property is being taken care of. I asked the RTA for advise on this and was told that it is ok to take photos and send them to the owner without the tenants' permission. I ask owners to sign a disclaimer saying they will not post any photos on social media use them for any purpose other than to see their property but my disclaimer would not have any legal standing. I believe this is an area where the RTA needs a definite policy and is an area where the legislation has fallen behind technology. I would suggest the legislation allow photos preferably with the tenants' permission but that these photos are for the owners information only and may not be used for other purposes without the tenants' permission. Agents really do not need to photograph a property during a tenancy unless there are problems. For the most part I have been able to let owners see their property by using Skype for inspections. This leaves no permanent record. All owners who have participated in Skyped inspections have been happy with this and in fact prefer it to photographs and in these instances all tenants have been happy with this situation.
      • NS1968 10 days ago
        Hi Emma. I did report these things to the RTA, as I felt they were significant breaches of ... protocol?I agree that the issue of photographs is one that needs careful consideration in terms of weighing up a tenants' right to privacy, and an owner's right to 'see' the state of the property. Perhaps images should only be able to be taken of particular aspects of a property, or under certain conditions. I agree with what I think you're saying, too, that whatever rules there are around TAKING images, there needs to be some careful discussion and appropriate rules around USING/STORING those images. :)
      • Tammy N 10 days ago
        I have rented for over 20 years and for the last 15 years have never had a real estate agent or property manager negotiate a time for inspections. They state that they will be here some time within a 5 hour period and that the time frame is not negotiable, as if I am not able to be home they will let them selves in. It is usually a different representative of the agency each time so I do not know the person coming. When I first began renting the inspections were 6 monthly for the first year and then annually. About 15 years ago I was informed that rules had changed and inspections were to be three monthly with no possible negotiation on this.
        • Emmadeanne 9 days ago
          Tammy I am in a bit of a different position to real estate agent property managers. I am an onsite manager so actually live in the complex where most of the properties in my letting pool are situated. I have some properties outside the complex but they are all quite close, no more than a ten minute drive away so I am in a better position to negotiate times than a property manager who has 200 properties scattered all over Brisbane. To make the situation worse for tenants many large agencies outsource their inspections to companies that specialise in just doing inspections. These people have to do a lot of inspections each day so I guess they would be unlikely to negotiate a time. I am puzzled by the five hour time frame as the RTA entry notice clearly states that the owner/property manager must state a two hour time frame for entry. There is a space on the form for this. I believe that this would also apply to secondary agents such as specialised inspectors as they are working for the agency the owner uses to manage the property.
      • Van 9 days ago
        I agree that the Act is way behind modern technology - it doesn't acknowledge the ease with which digital photographs can be taken and disseminated. Thank you for being one of the good agents who has respect for tenants.
    • JaniceAC 7 days ago
      These inspections are carried out to check for owner maintenance and to also check the tenant is not damaging a property. I don’t care what your personal living habits are unless those habits are damaging the property.
    • bartj 7 days ago
      I don't know where agents get off to be honest, I've never trusted an agent in my home when I'm not there. These people are complete strangers and I've got no reason to trust they won't rifle through my things or steal from me. I find they're very respectful and brief when I'm with them though...
  • T17 11 days ago
    After reading a lot of these comments I'm not sure what a lot of people expect when renting. For sure tenants need to have their rights preserved and are entitled to a safe and habitable home. I bought an investment property with my family and we only just manage to make repayments. We have a lovely tenant who has never caused any trouble and always paid her rent. We keep up to date with the maintenance and even paid for her water one period because we had a fight with an insurance company that dragged on but she was very accommodating. In saying that if all these rules come into play e.g. removal of negative gearing, tenants not wanting annual inspections, tenants being able to make modifications without permission, restricting access to tradespeople, lease changes etc. it would just not be feasible to own a rental property as we could no longer afford it. We are surely not the only ones who would be in the same position so what happens when other owners start selling their properties and all of a sudden there are not enough rentals for tenants? Where does everyone expect to live? Public housing simply cannot cope with the current demand what would happen when owners suddenly cannot afford their home and banks force them to sell? It is all good to recommend changes but owners are people too and need to have some control over their investment.
    • Angela Ballard 10 days ago
      The attitude that an investment property is the investors home is problematic. Home is created by people dwelling in a place and when they can do that quite freely and without threat of being moved on quite regularly at someone else's insistence then again the research data shows that they will invest care, time and funds into looking after their home (and your investment).Over 40% of renters in my research moved 3-5 times in 5 years. over 80% moved 1-10 times in 5 years. 15% who got to stay in place still felt substantially challenged in the sense of security because they knew that could have to move for other peoples agendas.the housing is not going away, even if lots of investors bail. In the long run, bigger picture this is probably a good thing for housing people more securely but that's a much bigger and different conversation
    • Cathe_78 10 days ago
      Unfortunately, a lot of people have been encouraged to invest in property – when they really should have invested in something safer. The very-long-term history of property prices show that this is NOT a safe investment in the long run. Yes, we've had a two-decade (or more, by some arguments) run of increasing property prices, but this has been driven by changes to the tax laws (discounted capital gains tax rates, increases in negative gearing allowances, both of which are paid for by the rest of the tax-paying society, including renters). These changes encouraged people to invest in real estate – and artificially drove up the demand for real estate, and thus prices. This wasn't due to increases in the population or an underlying housing shortage. The other massive contributing factor was the banks' willingness (eagerness, really) to lend increasingly large amounts – and this increase in mortgage credit is the factor most strongly correlated with rising house prices. [And the current royal commission into the banking industry should help to dispel any doubts over their guilt in this matter.] All of this has inflated a truly immense property bubble in Australia, which has gone on longer than should have been physically possible! So long, in fact, that everyone now believes constantly rising house prices are normal. One of the effects of all of this has been to encourage many people to become landlords, without preparing them for the real costs and responsibilities of being landlords, and also leaving them extremely vulnerable to changes in house prices. I think there is probably a very good case for people caught in this trap to pursue class actions against the banks (especially when this bubble FINALLY bursts and a lot of people end up in deep trouble).
    • bartj 7 days ago
      T17, do you think your house will evaporate if you can't afford to own it? If there's a mass sell of of houses by investors, then it will become a buyers market, presumably prices will adjust accordingly - someone will buy it. Don't pretend you're providing a public service.
  • KaTeMc 7 days ago
    My last landlord insisted on cash rental payments and turned up at my door every second Thursday evening with a like or lump it approach and an unwillingness to accept electronic payments. This type of regular entry is an invasion of privacy. These kinds of practices need to stop.
  • Angela Ballard 12 days ago
    Here's a radical idea. Get tenants to do the maintenance reports quarterly. Give them a checklist, and ask them to contact management if stuff needs doing. And then see what actually gets followed up on and repaired. So many opinions in this thread point to the need for annual, certified maintenance checks for minimum standards. That should be enough to assuage the 'maintenance' argument. Then it becomes about tenancy, not property management, and that's another story. There's as much need to manage owners and agents behaviours as tenants.
    • Pam4 12 days ago
      Some tenants would be great at this. Others couldn't be bothered. The owner is responsible for maintenance so from a liability point of view I don't think it would be acceptable to pass that responsibility on to the tenant.
    • homelesswithpets 11 days ago
      I don’t think the agents would agree to this based on the fact that when they conduct inspections that is one of their services as property manager that they bill the owner for. Less inspections = less money for them. At least that is what I have been told by owners and agents before.
      • Angela Ballard 11 days ago
        Very likely. Inspections justify agents existence. if they look busy busy busy every 3 months then they must be doing a good job. Unfortunately that frequency level of inspections buys into nonsense attitudes about tenants being second class, trashing the joint, being untrustworthy etc etc. They don't have to inspect so regularly, but the culture and practice in Queensland became turbocharged with changes made by the Newman government which strengthened contractual obligations on agents. That legislation is no longer but the marketing practice and imposition on renters remains.
        • T17 11 days ago
          Angela, I am a property manager and routine inspections are needed for both the tenant and the owner. Some owners rely on their agent viewing the property on their behalf if they have not been able to view their property for some time (overseas/interstate owners). Owners rely on agents to see what maintenance may be required or what improvements could be made. Tenants do report maintenance but sometimes they do not notice everything. Often tenants do not report overgrown trees even though it can cause blockages leading to huge structural issues. It also ensures that tenants are keeping on top of their responsibilities. Most of the time tenants really look after the properties but there are times when checks are needed. Inspections also give a chance for tenants to mention something that may be going on that they don't always feel is important but can turn into a bigger problem. Inspections really shouldn't be a hassle for anyone involved if everyone is doing the right thin.
          • Angela Ballard 11 days ago
            T17 Routine inspections are not the issue, its the frequency of three monthly and the lack of proper care to investigate and fix actual maintenance issues. As per an earlier comment there is no reason why property maintenance inspections should not be undertaken in between tenancies, when the place is momentarily vacated. All the things you mention are slow moving issues so again, not necessary for quarterly inspections if the building inspections are done properly. Tenants are not necessarily at home when inspections occur and besides, an email or phone call can suffice. The point I am trying to make is that the system is geared to agents and owners outcomes, not renters needs for a sense of home without interference. The problem, writ large in my research data, is the impact on privacy - having people wander through your personal space and belongings, taking photos ( a common practice with phones these days). 79% of respondents indicated very strongly that inspections are the greatest impost on privacy. So, its not for agents to declare its not a problem.
            • foxje 1 day ago
              I believe she said it shouldn’t be a problem if everyone is doing the right thing, I’m not sure that specific question was tested in your PhD? Also, to be frank, a study of 233 renters in a population of 500,000+ barely qualifies as an exploratory analysis; certainly not the level of investigation necessary to support any evidence-based policy positions. I suggest your comment that the ‘system’ is geared towards owners and agents is an outcome of private property rights, and to ‘gear’ it in any other direction is an encorachmwnt on those private property rights which underpin our society. I do not disagree on some of your points that less frequent entries may be beneficial to tenants. However to disregard the impact on owners or agents is immature.
          • Van 8 days ago
            I don't understand how quarterly routine inspections are "for the tenant". I don't need the agent to come around to my house every three months for me to report maintenance problems. I tell them by email when I notice anything that needs repair. My current agent scheduled the first routine inspection only six weeks after I moved in. I questioned it and was told, "Oh, it's for you just as much as it is for us." No, it wasn't for me; it was a bloody nuisance. I hadn't even found all my furniture and settled in before they came barging through the front door. I wonder if it would help for agents/property owners to supply information on what tenants should be looking out for, as many people would have no idea - as long as it's seen as a "for your information" document and not a transfer of legal responsibility for the maintenance from the owner to the tenant.
          • unhappy renter 6 days ago
            If what you say was true then all the maintenance issues reported would be fixed. There has been overhanging branches blocking guttering in our units for months and reported regularly but nothing has ever been done. I agree with homeless with pets the property managers go through the motions taking photos, opening cupboards etc, so it looks like they are busy and doing their job but noting ever gets fixed unless it is something they legally have to fix. Such as a water problem.
      • FSL2018 11 days ago
        Most agreement are a % of rent. So if the tenant is paying the rent, the owner and the property manager don't get paid.
    • bartj 7 days ago
      This is actually completely realistic Angela, the last inspection I had, a couple of years ago - the agent was using an ipad app, to take photos and upload them directly to a database, which is then available for the owner to see. To be honest, I wonder why, in this day and age, people still bother with an agent at all.
  • Angela Ballard 12 days ago
    My research asked about privacy and inspections were by far the greatest impact on privacy...79% of over 220 respondents indicated this strongly. There's no evidence whatsoever for the ground level practice of 3monthly inspections in Queensland. That practice is based in marketing to property owners and severely impacts on Renters sense of home. Nothing tells them that they as renters are second class than these inspections. A better approach is to establish a tenancy and ensure that the property itself is up to minimum standards at the three month mark which is also sufficient time to assess tenants payments etc. Once all is well established sliding scale of inspections 6-12monthly is more than sufficient in vast majority of tenancies. Inspecting tenants quarterly, and not actually ensuring minimum standards and repairs is a dreadful impost on those paying for a home they never get to settle into because of regular and for sale inspections. Agents don't consider tenants their customers....and that's part of the problem. Much better training and practice change required. As a wit recently said baristas receive far more training than the 1day to become a property manager!
    • FSL2018 12 days ago
      Tenants aren't the agent's customer. They do not pay the agent's commission. Tenant's are the consumer in this scenario. Unfortunately, the few bad apples have spoiled it for the majority of tenants. Agent's can not ascertain if a tenant is good or bad, they can only recommend on previous behaviour. (Rent kept up to date, good tenant ledger etc). They also can't tell if a previously 'good' tenant is going to turn 'bad' (for reasons within or beyond the tenant's control), hence why the quarterly inspections. At the most it should be 6 monthly, but no longer. The key I think to this relationship is communication. If a tenant keeps in regular contact with their agent, things can get sorted out much quicker. The greasy wheel ....
      • EarlGrey 12 days ago
        FSL2018,You have defiantly got that wrong, without the rent payment from the customer (tenant) commission cannot be paid. A remark like "A few bad apples have spoiled it for the majority of tenants " is the typical closed minds that seem to persist amongst agents with rent rolls. When renting houses I have had to change agents many time because of a lack of professional experience combined with social ineptness. Agents are the one's who should be keeping in touch on a regular basis. if you throw bricks you have to expect bricks back, but if you throw roses you come out smelling roses. If you expect the best you may very often get the best back.
      • Angela Ballard 12 days ago
        there's a big difference between sharing an opinion and research data and analysis based in hundreds of rental experiences. by the same token renters cannot know if an agent or owner is good or bad. As I stated there is no research or evidence whatsoever to back up the claim that quarterly inspections are necessary. Quite the contrary. What all parties in this system do not acknowledge is that if renters are not permitted to make a rental place into their home they may not be invested sufficiently (in time love or money) to care about the property as per the expectation that they treat it like home. Respect for renters needs to make a place home (which means longer flexible tenancies, allowance for minor, non structural, changes, pets etc) is repaid in kind. research data again shows that tenants often contact for necessary repairs and get no response whatsoever yet put up with nonsense inspections so the agents can tick a box. The best rental outcomes appear to come when people have been in a city long enough to move out of formal, agent managed places into direct relationship with owners happy to have good tenants stay as long as they like and where tenants are happy to take care...because they too know they are being looked after.
        • FSL2018 12 days ago
          I agree that a landlord/agent who does not repair or respond is despicable. However, allowing tenants minor, non-structural changes is fine as long as the tenant is willing to pay to have the property returned to the original state as per the entry condition report. For example, a tenant at present should ask if they can put up picture hooks. Seems ridiculous however, imagine the property being rented to 4 different tenants over a 16 year period. Each tenant is allowed to put up picture hooks where-ever they choose to suit their framed photographs. Each tenant will have different types and sizes of frames and so will required the hooks to be in different places. The landlord at the end of the period is left with walls full of holes that needs to be repaired. Which tenant is required to pay for this? Or is it now the landlords responsibility to fix the wall? Another example, pets. Under the proposed changes, a tenant is allowed to keep pets without landlord approval and gets a dog. The dog wees on the carpet many times during the tenancy and the tenant cleans the carpet as best they can during their tenancy. They get the carpet dry-cleaned at the end of the tenancy and all is hunky-dory when they move out. Unfortunately, the next tenant starts complaining of a foul smell coming from the carpet and it is found that the wee has penetrated the underlay which now can't be cleaned. Is it now the landlord's responsibility to replace the carpet? Or should they go through QCAT and have to pay the fees associated with this, to get the previous tenant to pay for it? The tenant's right to live in a property does not outway the landlords right to maintain the property as they see fit, meeting all legal requirements (e.g. hot running water etc). No tenant should have to live in a substandard dwelling.
          • Angela Ballard 12 days ago
            The better solution here is for owners concerned about this to install a hanging system that various tenants can buy the hanging parts for...and put things up where they like. I have never known owners to repair tiny picture holes in walls in 35 years of renting. Guidance about the type of wall and hooks required would help...tho my current landlord gave wrong info on that. I simply used the existing holes.there are points here about balance. the point of balance my research group came up with re tenant changes to property (to make the place home) was.....all non structural changes allowed subject to a return to the condition of property upon leasing. (I would now add subject to negotiation at end of tenancy) This means....sure paint a wall purple and have a dog but if the wall was white to begin with then that's what it should go back to. Wear and tear is expected...and yes, animals and humans get sick, pee on carpets and old fittings and materials (lino, laminate, old plastic light shades,) break down. the number of times I have lived with 85 year old lino - multiples patterns in one room! and disintegrating carpet - causing health problems for me -simply because the owners wanted to protect the floorboards from people renting the place still appalls me.As for the rest of it....thanks what entry and exit reports are for and bond. Kids make just as much or more mess than animals...but there's no rule about them.
          • Lildei 11 days ago
            The property would have been professionally painted twice in that 16 year period if it were properly maintained, so those holes would be repaired at that stage. Any professional painter will tell you that interior walls need to be painted at least every 5 to 8 years, unfortunately not many owners are prepared maintain their properties to that standard
            • FSL2018 11 days ago
              Lildei, I'm not sure how you work out that the property would have been painted professionally every 5-8 years. That may be what professional painters say however painting is only required when there is extensive damage to the paint or the wall, otherwise there is no requirement to paint the walls. Maybe these expectations of a landlord are unrealistic, especially if there is no need for the walls to be painted. Many homeowners do not paint their interiors every 8 years, so why should a landlord be expected too. In a rental, if a wall is required to be painted, it will only be the damaged wall not every room. Also, the underlying assumption that renters are entitled to have their property painted every 8 years is unrealistic. The myth that landlords are fat cats and can afford everything is perpetuated to the detriment of all involved. Especially when the majority of landlords are mum and dad investors. (For clarity, they bought the property as part of their retirement plan). Rent usually only covers the cost of the mortgage, so when there is an issue, the money has to come from their wage. Usually, good owners will have a rainy day savings account to cover emergency repairs - toilets/roof leaks etc. Most landlords, like most tenants, don't have the ability to hold $10,000 just in case the property needs to be repainted. So although in the perfect world the property would have been painted twice, the reality is that the painting would probably not have happened. Angela, kids do make a mess but they usually don't pee on the carpet and scratch doors. They also usually learn from their mistakes, granted some quicker than others. Also, why should a landlord that has a particular style of home have to change that style and install a hanging system for one tenant when another may want a different height etc? I appreciate that pets and minor changes can help make a property a home, however, both sides needs, have to be balanced. If a landlord is prepared to allow pets, then that's great, if not, the tenant needs to find a property that does allow pets or alternatively, find a pet that is suitable to the landlord.
              • Angela Ballard 11 days ago
                the hanging system I am referring to has lines with clips that hang from a cornice level track. I suggested the owner put in to track and the renters pay for and keep the lines/clips to hang at the level they want and then take it with them to the next place. The cost is shared equally and everybody is happy...unless there happens to be an owner who can't bear the thought of the renters (paying off his/her investment) making a rental property into their home and living a normal life. the category of investor is not the issue here. Investors need to fully understand the costs, and insure for risk like a business or buy shares instead.
              • Lildei 11 days ago
                I didn’t say it was a requirement to repaint but if tenants are expected to look after a property so should the owner, my brother was a painter, you should repaint at least every 8 years to keep the walls in a reasonable condition, after 16 years the walls are going to be looking pretty shabby anyway, if tenants are expected to look after the property the landlord should be required to do the same. I have lived in properties that haven’t been painted for over 20 years,it would be a bit unreasonable for the landlord to complain about the condition of the walls when tenants move out if they haven’t been painted for that long. As to mum and dad investors, they must realise that there is a need to maintain a property as well as doing emergency repairs, after all property investment is a long term investment, without routine maintenance the property will deteriorate no matter how good the tenants are. If they can’t afford to maintain a property to a reasonable standard they should consider investing elsewhere
                • FSL2018 11 days ago
                  Again Lildei why should a landlord have to repaint every 8 years if it is not needed. Also, should a tenant be treated differently to a home owner. If a home owner does not repaint their walls every 8 years why should a landlord be expected to do it? Also, why should the landlord have to repaint the walls to fix the holes that are made by the tenant in the first place.I am not suggesting that the walls never get painted or they are left to get into a dilapidated state. What I am pointing out is that tenants have an unrealistic expectation of what a landlord should and shouldn't be required to do.Most mum and dad investors do realise what they are getting into. When they get a good tenant, they will go out of their way to keep them, as it is much easier to paint the wall than to have new tenants move in.My point in all of this is why should the landlord be financially responsible for tenant choices? pets/picture hooks etc. Why should they not have a say in how their property is treated?
                  • Lildei 10 days ago
                    I agree, the landlord shouldn’t be out of pocket because of a tenants choices, no argument there. If a tenant puts picture hooks in and the landlord wants them removed at the end of the tenancy any damage should be repaired.
                  • unhappy renter 6 days ago
                    It seems to me owners and agents have all the say, it's tenants who have no say. They are expected to maintain the property and keep it to a good standard yet owners don't seem to have any responsibility in ensuring those properties are kept to a good standard. My walls virtually have no paint left on them, I'm down to the plasterboard and of course they look tatty. No amount of scrubbing or cleaning can make them look any better. The bare minimum that is required legally is performed and nothing else. I have spent money here trying to fix things to make it a pleasant place to live, is that acknowledged? Will I ever see my money again when I move out? Does the owner benefit from the improvements I have made to his property? FSL2018 think carefully about what you are saying.
              • unhappy renter 6 days ago
                What about when you inherit an animal that's been abandoned b the previous tenant and the agent has not ensured the animal has been removed before the new tenant moves in? That is my case, and now the agent is trying to force me to take responsibility for the animal that was left here! My property owner has many properties and none of them are in good repair, when they get so run down it is going to cost a fortune to fix he simply sells the property on and buys another what about those tenants? I have spent a considerable sum of my own money trying to make this property into a home, replacing broken and badly damaged fixtures as well trying to keep a well maintained garden that was not there when I moved in. The agent who inspected my home last week complained I needed to weed my garden even though there wasn't a garden there when I moved in!
          • Sanch 6 days ago
            This is a bit absurd. A bit of filler and a splash of paint , and picture holes are filled and covered.I have 2 dogs. They don't wee inside, why would I expect that a 'Tenant's ' dog would ?
        • foxje 1 day ago
    • Emmadeanne 11 days ago
      Angela it took me far more than one day to become a real estate agent and for my licence to become an onsite manager (resident letting agent) I agree with some of what you say. Certainly agents need to do an inspection at the three or four month mark to assess the general progress of the tenancy after that every six months or in an ideal world one year would be ok in many cases. However many tenants for reasons known only to themselves do not report even quite major problems if they occur between inspections. In one case I know of the tenants did not report that a leak in the upstairs bathroom was damaging the ceiling plaster in the lounge for five months. The damage cost the owners much more to repair than if the problem had been promptly reported. When new tenants arrive to pick up their keys I always stress that they should report maintenance issues promptly but it does not always happen. Another thing that needs to be considered is that an property manager's contract is with the owner not with the tenant. If the owner insists on inspections every three months and I do not do this I am in breach of my contract with him or her. That said I find after the first six months if the tenancy is going well most owners are happy for inspections to take place every six months. Maybe there needs to be something in the legislation to ensure that tenants do report problems within a reasonable time and also that owners also have an obligation to ensure maintenance is completed in a reasonable time. Often agents are blamed for lack of maintenance but I am not allowed to spend more on an owner's behalf than is listed in his or her form six no matter how much I might agree with the tenant.
    • Emmadeanne 11 days ago
      Angela you have a lot to say on this subject and refer to research you have done. Could you please let me know where I can view a copy of this research and in what capacity you conducted it. Sorry if you have given this information in another post but I have not seen it.
  • BronwynJ 16 days ago
    Entry needs to be granted for inspections and maintenance. Trying to achieve a time that suits tenants would be impossible for both property managers and tradies. As a PM currently we get complaints from our tradies that when they do try to phone tenants to make a convenient time to attend the property the tenants won’t answer the phone or reply to messages. Legislative requirements for smoke alarm checking would be impossible to met if it could only be done at a time suitable to the tenant. Other suggestions around longer times between inspections for great tenants has some merit but even great tenants can miss some maintenance items. Unfortunately we’ve times also when great tenants have let a flatmate move in who does the wrong thing. It’s usually the minority who do the wrong thing but our rental laws need to cater for them.
    • unhappy renter 6 days ago
      I wonder how you would feel BronwynJ if someone told you maintenance had been booked for your home and you didn't know the person or tradesperson coming and you were unable to be home to let them in. Again this is another indication of how little tenants and their personal property and privacy are respected or considered.
    • Van 6 days ago
      Bronwyn, I do understand what you're saying, but as a renter who tries my utmost to be responsible and cooperative I get frustrated when agents still treat me as if I'm one of the minority who do the wrong thing. It makes me feel like I'm getting treated like a schoolchild. I'd also check with your tradies to make sure they are calling tenants at a reasonable time. I've just organised maintenance with one of my agent's tradies. He called me four times before I got back to him. That sounds bad on my part, until I mention that three of those calls were outside normal business hours (two after 5pm and one on Saturday morning).As for even great tenants missing maintenance items, work with us. Tell us what you would you like us to look out for between inspections. Not all tenants would be bothered, sure, but there are a lot of us who would be happy to help.
      • BronwynJ 6 days ago
        Van, your note about 3 of the 4 times being a tradie ringing outside of hours -they do that because so many tenants can't answer their mobiles during work hours - so they are trying to be helpful. Also, the tradesman only have so many hours in the day they can allocate to admin, some of the time they actually have to do the work on the tools. This is what is so frustrating about a lot of these threads, everyone wants entry just to to suit them when it is going to be impossible for any rule changes to keep everyone happy.
        • Van 6 days ago
          Sure, I can understand that they're trying to be helpful and that they can't spend all day on admin. My point is that if people can't answer the phone after business hours - they might be engaged in leisure activities, as I was, or driving home from work - then you might get problems arranging times. I could have contacted him later in the evening, however I didn't want to do that because there was a good chance he would be having dinner or spending time with family. I ended up texting him so that he could respond at his leisure and we sorted it out, which is the important thing.Anyway, it's a pretty small issue in the grand scheme of things. I just thought I'd explain how it was from my point of view.
          • Marie2402 5 days ago
            Normally people can’t answer their phones during business hours, it not normally the case for leisure periods....surely your work ethic is the wrong way around! If I had arrange maintenance for my home, I would make sure I would answer the tradies call so he could access to my property at a time that would be suitable for the both of us. I really don’t think your attitude towards the owner or the tradie is appropriate or fair. It’s not about working to your schedule, is about getting the job complete to make sure the owners property doesn’t get damage and as a tenant you can live in a safe environment.
            • Van 5 days ago
              Wow, you're making an awful lot of assumptions about my work ethic and the situation based on my one post. Actually, I was extremely busy at work that whole week as well, and when I say "leisure activities", I mean I was going for a brisk walk to relax and clear my head because I needed to switch off for a while due to the craziness of the week. The first day the tradie called was Thursday evening; I had a time arranged by Saturday evening. Had it not been a weekend, I probably would have had it sorted by Saturday morning. Considering the maintenance request was the equivalent of a broken cupboard door handle and not anything that could damage the property, I think that's reasonable. Had it been something urgent I would have called him back that night, regardless of whether I was concerned about interrupting his evening or not.
      • Fc35 1 day ago
        Van, organising trade work is never easy for anyone, do you not think that homeowners aren't similarly inconvenienced when something goes wrong & they need to organise a tradie visit? its always inconvenient when a tradesman needs to visit for whatever reason, and I hardly think calling someone on a Saturday morning is bad practice, in fact I think it shows great customer service.
        • Van 1 day ago
          I didn't say it was bad practice. Nor did I suggest that organising a tradie should be convenient. I was trying to explain, probably very badly, that in addition to being unable to answer the phone at work, people might not be available to answer the phone outside business hours all the time either.I think the moral of the story is that we're all busy whether we're tenants, agents or owners. We have work, we have obligations outside work, we have hobbies and families. We have to prioritise. Organising a tradie for a non-urgent repair, although important, might not jump immediately to the top of that list. If a tenant doesn't organise a non-urgent repair immediately, it might not be because they're being obstructive; it might be because they're busy.Of course, if they don't respond within a reasonable period of time, the agent should be able to issue a notice to enter.
  • Over it 10 days ago
    I am a landlord who prides themselves on making sure my property is safe and in good condition I do not believe I have the right to disturb my tenants peace and enjoyment of their home, but in order to keep our home safe and secure for my tenants I make sure their pest control is done yearly include termite control etc and any maintance issue is attended to immediately if possible but as our property is remote it is not always easy to get trades to attend. I believe tenants should not have to have a landlord or property manager enter their house when no one is home if this should happen on a planned inspection all I ask of my tenant is to let my property manager know and it can be rescheduled to more suitable time.maybe good old fashioned respect from both sides may be all that is required. :-)
  • bartj 7 days ago
    I voted in the poll that notice for non-urgent matters should be 7 days, however I'd qualify that I think there should be room for negotiation. Trades can be hard to organise for specific dates and times, but there needs to be some clear guidelines, so tenants know what rights they have and agents know their limits. As a tenant, I've appreciated when I have an agent who is willing to negotiate on day/time for entry - as I've never liked the idea of anyone being in my home when I'm not there, so I'm much more accommodating when there is some mutual respect shown. When it comes to tradesmen, notice from the agent that a trade is required, and details for me to contact them or that they will contact to arrange times, has worked as an effective system for me in the past, but the current regulation, leaves that up to the conduct of the agent, which is inadequate.
    • Van 5 days ago
      Again, I find myself agreeing with you, bartj! I think "negotiation" is the key concept here. My experience as a renter has been that many agents - even the good ones - are extremely reluctant to engage in negotiation of any kind. With some exceptions I have basically been told from on high how it's going to be. I think it contributes to the bad feeling tenants have for agents. If agents treated renters like competent, responsible adults, I think renters would be much more willing to be accommodating.
      • ChristineA 4 days ago
        I agree that negotiation is paramount. Its a shame that there can't be more of it. Maybe we as Agents (and I hope we don't) come across as non-negotiable simply due to the volume of properties that have to be managed. Regrettably, tradies for us too can be hard to come by and are not sitting about waiting for us to call. We ask that they contact the tenants to work out a mutually convenient time. We do this out of respect for our tenants. a- it is their home, b- they could be shiftworkers, be ill or have a tiny baby that makes a change to their routine. We ask also that if they haven't spoken to the tradie in a reasonable time, that they contact the tradie.What do home owners do? They make arrangements to be home during the day - just like any resident must.
      • unhappy renter 1 day ago
        Bartj and Van I agree with what you are both saying about negotiation however, my latest experience has shown me that not all agents are willing to negotiate or respect tenants rights and privacy. I truly believe that whilst negotiation is the key and the preferred method for dealing with issues of entry there should be consistency across the board on how property managers behave. For example, my daughter is renting in Brisbane and the owner is selling the property, she has arranged with the owner and the property manager for an open inspection once a fortnight on a Saturday as both she and her partner work long hours. A friend on mine who has been in his property for four years has negotiated six monthly inspections as the property manager and owner both know he looks after the property. On this forum there are owners and other tenants who also state positive solutions regarding entry etc. Unfortunately this is not the case for a lot of us and we are not given the luxury of negotiation just told this is how it is. This is why I think guidelines, regulations etc should change so that it is fair for everyone and property managers are made to be consistent and follow the examples of considerate reasonable managers and owners who listen to the needs of tenants and work towards solutions that benefit everyone.
  • unhappy renter 7 days ago
    I'm not sure what others think but I recently received my renewal tenancy agreement for a property I have been renting for over 4 years. The property manager had added in an approval for a pet cat without my knowledge or consent. ( I don't own a cat, I'm highly allergic to them). However, there is an abandoned cat that lives in the yard. The previous tenant left it behind. If I sign this agreement that makes me responsible for the animal and subject to the terms and conditions of keeping a pet in a rented property. One of those conditions is a cat must be kept inside the property at night. Given my allergies that is ridiculous, I don't feed the animal but I have under compassionate grounds provided a small kennel for shelter. Is it legal for them to add in items on the tenancy agreement without my knowledge or consent?
    • Van 7 days ago
      That sounds weird and is a very good reminder for everyone to reread all the documents when renewing a tenancy to ensure nothing has been amended. Before signing it I would contact the Residential Tenancies Authority and/or Tenants Queensland for advice. I'd also contact the real estate agent and ask why they've added that clause. I'm not sure who's actually responsible for an abandoned animal on a rental property, but it's almost certainly not you.
      • unhappy renter 7 days ago
        Thank you! I did contact the agent and her response was that it was put there in case another property manager potentially breached me for the animal living in the yard. However theta has been there for 4 years, the owner knows about it and all the property managers know as well. I see this as a direct ploy to make me responsible for the animal. Especially when it wasn't discussed with me first.
        • Sanch 6 days ago
          Not certain why you dont call your Council , declare it is an abandoned animal and have them come and get it and deal with it. It is not , nor should it be seen, as your responsibility. If Council unwilling, call RSPCA.Again, appalling behaviour by Property Managers.
          • unhappy renter 5 days ago
            You're right I could ring the council or the RSPCA, but it's an old cat. As he wasn't hurting anyone (not even the wild life) I tolerated him in my yard thinking he could spend the rest of his days there. It was bad enough and confusing that his owner had just left him. The neighbour feeds him and would have taken him but her little dog won't stand for it, consequently he lives in the yard when he is around. I guess I didn't want to be responsible for a living creature to be put down for no other reason except he had no where else to go. I wasn't brought up that way, life is precious even if it is a cranky old cat who has no idea he is causing such a problem for a property manager.
            • Sanch 5 days ago
              Removed by moderator.
    • Angela Ballard 7 days ago
      Its not your cat, so you have no responsibility. Permission or approval does not mean you are taking up the offer of approval
      • unhappy renter 7 days ago
        Thank you Angela, it is quite worrying when you find something has been added without your knowledge. I receive my lease renewal form electronically and sometimes it is tempting to just sign it and send it back. I don't think I will be tempted again though!
        • unhappy renter 6 days ago
          Have heard back from Qld Tenants and the advice was because I "allowed " the cat to remain on the property it can be considered my cat and I can be breached for not having an approval for it. As for them adding it to the lease without my knowledge, you guessed it! My fault again, it's up to me to thoroughly read any document before signing it. For those people who have trouble with literacy this makes them especially vulnerable given that they trust the agent. As it stands now I have been advised to contact RSPCA or an animal refuge and have the animal removed, once again I'm left with the responsibility of cleaning up someone else's mess. The previous tenant was notified by the previous agent to come and get her cat but this has never been followed up and now consequently it has been made my problem.
          • homelesswithpets 4 days ago
            Unhappy renter I am glad you have compassion for this cat but PLEASE contact a refuge (preferably one with a no euthanasia policy) to collect the cat (explain that due to your allergies you are unable to bring it to them yourself). Or perhaps your neighbour could surrender it for you. The poor thing, being old, could very well be suffering from illness (even something like arthritis can be very debilitating for an older animal) and would definately have a better life in a refuge until it is rehomed.
            • unhappy renter 1 day ago
              Sorry for the late reply homelesswithpets, I have spoken to the neighbour about him and your concerns about his health. She assures me he is in good health and he is probably only about six or seven years old. Being allergic to cats I've never really taken an interest in their ages, and perhaps because he was already an adult cat when I moved in four years ago I assumed he was older than he really is. The real problem is he has become the community cat, it isn't just my yard he resides in. According to her he does the rounds and lives and sleeps in several gardens in our neighbourhood. Across the road he sleeps on their pingpong table, next door to me he sleeps on their porch, the neighbour over the back of my place has put our a chair for his exclusive use and my neighbour who feeds him has a bed made up in the shed (where the dog can't reach him) so that where there is a storm he has a dry place to go. Apparently there are at least three other places he "hangs his hat" besides the ones mentioned. However, my neighbour who feeds him has decided she is going to take him, not sure how it will work out with the dog but she is adamant he should be allowed to remain in an area he considers his patch. My son brought up an interesting thought though, for four years I have lived here and the cat has never been a secret. The owner knows about him and even told me his own mother has had a similar experience and is now looking after an abandoned cat. The property managers have been doing quarterly inspections for four years, the cat has never been an issue and they have always been well aware of his existence and the arrangement with the neighbour to feed him. One has to wonder why now they have decided to behave like it's a new thing.
  • Alice Husband 15 days ago
    We lived in a rental property where the owner would just come around to the house whenever she wanted. There was nothing we could do unless we wanted to issue a notice of breach. There doesn't seem to be much point in creating extra rules for property owners unless there is some incentive to comply with them.
    • GeeGee 12 days ago
      Is there any reason you didn't issue a Notice to Breach? It's there for you to use. It's a simple process.
      • Angela Ballard 10 days ago
        It may be a simple process but tenants well understand that breaching agents or owners can and often does end in retaliatory behaviours that are so difficult and time intensive to prove. Power can be nasty in asserting itself. So, the tenants lose out either way, and the proprietary interests in the system carry on... as they like.
        • GeeGee 10 days ago
          What I am hearing on this forum are tenants complaining about landlords and landlords complaining about tenants. The loathing for each other is disappointing especially when both brilliant tenants and landlords exist. Matching them is the key. Tenants have a right to a decent landlord and landlords have a right to a decent tenant. The bottom line is that no matter what laws are in place either side will break them if they are either a "bad tenant" or a "bad landlord". Just for the reason you stated above you don't exercise your rights for fear of reprisal and landlords are also in danger of tenants destroying their property when issuing a Notice to Remedy Breach. When a tenant stopped paying us rent after three weeks of moving in we were in all sorts of trouble. We found out there were drug deals being carried out on the property. We followed all due process which took weeks and the night before we were due to go to court (the prep took hours and hours of work) he left. He physically threatened us so much so that we were afraid to list him as a bad tenant for fear of our safety. So now he goes on to dupe some unsuspecting landlord. You can have all the laws in place to protect both sides but when you get a bad apple (either landlord or tenant) you'll find that one side will follow the law and one won't. The repercussions for the ones who don't are minimal to none.
    • Fc35 1 day ago
  • Corey8888 18 days ago
    I think that initial 3 monthly inspections for the first two is fine. After that it should be reduce to 2 a year. Every 3 months is so invasive and it actually causes me a heck of a lot of anxiety. It makes me feel like my life is on show and when pictures are being taken, it makes me feel even more uncomfortable. I pay money to live here, I don’t feel like my house should be a circus show.
  • Brianna Egan 11 days ago
    The current legislation is sufficient in its current form as there is already strict rules around accessing the property and time frames.
  • Rupert 16 days ago
    The current balance between rights of entry and rights to privacy is fine. Many agents do not understand the difference between rights of entry and obligation to entry, therefore they have been telling tenants that inspections every 3 months are required by law. I am an onsite manager and I know every tenants in my building, therefore there is no need for an inspection every 3 months for most of the tenants. But tenants are not always the person they claim they are. A longer notice period will give too much time to the tenants who are conducting illegal businesses in the property to hide evidence. The insurance is expected to go up if the rights of entry is further restricted, as the risk associated with the increased difficulties to identify breaches and mitigate loss will go up. With more costs to the landlords, the rent will also be transferred upon all tenants. Good tenants should not suffer from the increased living costs just because of the unreasonably increased level of protection given to few bad tenants. Therefore, current entry practices should be maintained, with more educations to landlords and agents that the inspections are not absolutely necessary to be carried out that frequently.
  • Lillian 18 days ago
    Yes that is correct every 3 months and then space them out as one can how tenant is behaving
    • Pam4 17 days ago
      It is not only about how a tenant is caring for the property it is also to look for wear and tear and preventative maintenance that might need to be done. In an extreme case a deck could deteriorate or a step become loose. Would the owner be held liable if they could inspect less often and the property became unsafe?
      • Emmadeanne 12 days ago
        Entirely agree. I did an inspection, the first I had done on that property since it came into my letting pool, and noticed that the carpet did not 'feel' right on one of the stairs. Quick look under the stairs and I found the entire tread had fallen off that and another stair. These two stairs were being held up by carpet alone no wooden treads. This was an accident just waiting to happen. The tenants said it had been like that for some time but they had not reported it to either the previous manager or me. I called a carpenter and had the stairs fixed the same day. I don't know how the owners would have stood legally had there been an accident. Without an inspection this problem would not have been picked up as these tenants were always reluctant to report any maintenance issues.
        • Angela Ballard 11 days ago
          This is why there needs to be full and proper building inspections at the beginning of a tenancy. Tenants are reluctant because they know from personal experience that a) its likely no-one will bother with the repair and b) if it does get repaired they get an increase in rent. There's no excuse for agents and owners failing to do a proper inspection in between tenancies, and then go blaming the tenants and citing the need for even more inspections. Do inspections properly in the first place - when people have moved out is the most appropriate time to get a building inspection done. As a tenant I reported numerous problems including the very dodgy front stairs not fixed until I told the owner the story about the coroners report on the death of a baby being held by her father who fell through the deck/flooring..In the meantime he was getting his own rebuilt. 2 years of occasional requests, 2 housemates and income lost because of multiple house repair issues not attended to. I know there are great agents and owners but there are some shockers too (and this guy was a great guy...just very stingy). But until there is evidence to link 3 monthly inspections to maintenance improvements there is little justification for the current regime. Agencies need to improve their practices and my suggestion above is a good place to start.
          • T17 11 days ago
            Angela proper building inspections is not feasible between every tenancy. Who would be willing to pay for this? If a tenant wants one done, should they have to pay? If an Owner has to pay for a report for every tenancy shouldn't be they be able to recoup those costs by putting the rent up with every report seeing as some can cost a few hundred dollars. Not all Owners are flush with cash and some rely on the income for rentals to make ends meet.
            • Angela Ballard 10 days ago
              perhaps paying for an annual building inspection would be a lot cheaper than 8-9% of rental income to an agent to not pass on maintenance requests to an owner..... that does happen. Owners not keen to pay for inspections may also be the very owners who don't care to maintain the rental place to a decent standard for people to live in....in which case its better they leave the system.
              • Van 9 days ago
                I had a situation once where the agent didn't report a maintenance problem to the landlord. The upstairs neighbour complained about a blockage in their shower drain, but nothing was done until the water leaked through my ceiling and through a light fitting, tripping an electrical safety switch and knocking out my lights. The same agent didn't bother to let me know that it was safe to turn the electricity back on once the leak was fixed. I think a good chunk of problems with renting are caused by poor agents who cause communication blocks between tenants and owners.
              • Marie2402 5 days ago
                Angela, I totally disagree with your whole statement. Properties age constantly...they need that check every 3 months. You pay for your car to be serviced, and checked by their age and mileage.....it’s the same for houses, why wouldn’t you pay for investment property to be checked? Some older wooden homes can deteriorate within the space of a few months....if you have a property manager checking it, they will see the maintenance that is needed way before the tenant does, saving the owner $1000’s.
          • Emmadeanne 11 days ago
            In this case a building inspection at the beginning of the tenancy would not have picked up any problems. The tenants had been renting that property for several years but admitted they had only noticed a problem with the stairs about three months before my inspection but for some reason had not reported it to the previous agent. All agents must complete an entry condition report at the beginning of each tenancy. As you would be aware this and the exit condition reports are mandated by the RTA. I always allow plenty of time to complete this report. Looking at all aspects of the property however I am not a builder or plumber etc. so if I find a problem I always let the owner know and get authorisation for a tradesperson to take a look. I take dated photographs and a video of the property while it is vacant this includes the inside of cupboards, under stairs etc. and share these with the new tenants through a cloud service. At the end of the lease both the tenants and I have these pictures and video to refer to as well as the written report. As I said in a previous post as long as the tenancy is going well I feel that after the first inspection at three months then six months or longer between inspections is fine. However if the owner states three monthly inspections on their form six then I have no choice but to do three monthly inspections even if I believe they are not necessary. The only thing I can do is make the inspections as unintrusive at possible for the tenant but in truth I have never had a tenant complain about the frequency or otherwise of inspections.
            • Angela Ballard 10 days ago
              What were all the other agents doing during their inspections of that property before you came along? The tenants had been there for years. Again, an argument that suggests that tenants were the problem does not stand up in this case...the poorly done, previous inspections were more likely the problem.
              • Emmadeanne 10 days ago
                Unfortunately Angela your argument does not stand up in this case although I admit probably due to my not giving enough history of this situation. The previous agent/manager had done an inspection six months before me. That inspection was thorough but did not mention any problems with the stairs because at that time on the tenants' admission there were not any they only noticed the problem a couple of months later. When I asked why they had not reported this they just said they waited until inspections to report any problems. I am sure you would agree that no matter how thorough an inspection is problems can suddenly arise in between inspections in rental properties just as they can arise suddenly in owner occupied properties. The strange thing in this situation is that this property is in the complex I manage, my office is a few metres from the tenants front door and I spoke to them even if only to say hello a couple of times a week but for some reason they still did not mention a problem with the stairs. This is not an isolated case I have found other less serious problems at inspections and when asked why they were not reported the tenants' answer has always been the same 'We always wait until the inspection.' Does your research indicate why tenants will not report problems between inspections?
        • unhappy renter 6 days ago
          One has to wonder why these tenants were reluctant to report maintenance issues. Perhaps in the past there had been bad relations and fear of being given a 60 day notice to vacate if they complained too much. Don't be so quick to judge the tenant without finding out the why. Most people who rent are responsible people. Who would deliberately put themselves in danger when there is a clear health and safety issue?
          • Emmadeanne 6 days ago
            Yes Unhappy renter I do wonder why anyone would put themselves in danger but I certainly do not judge tenants. These tenants were just into the seventh month of a twelve month fixed term lease so they could certainly could not have been given two months' notice to leave. They did leave at the end of that lease for employment reasons not because the owner instructed me to give them a notice to leave. Unfortunately I have come across several problems that should have been attended to much sooner but the tenants wait until an inspection to report the problem and I am not some anonymous property manager I live in the complex I manage so actual speak to most tenants at least once a week, only in passing I do not go around knocking at doors, so this puzzles me completely. A number of the problems I have found, cooking appliances not working etc. are actually emergency repairs under the act and I cannot imagine trying to live on takeaways and salad for months on end because the stove did not work. I admit that a minority of my owners do not like to spend money on what they consider to be minor repairs (mesh in fly screens and the like) but can usually be persuaded if they think they might lose a good tenant. I have asked tenants why they did not report a problem but the reply is always the same 'I knew an inspection was due (sometimes months away) so I waited.' I certainly would not have waited. I am like any property manager my contract is with the owner and I am constrained by the instructions that owner has given me in their form 6. I feel that if tenancy laws are changed the Office of Fair Trading will have to change its forms to reflect the changes to this legislation.
            • unhappy renter 6 days ago
              I find it difficult to understand why people would want to live with a dangerous issue such as the stairs you mentioned. I wonder what would cause the stairs to deteriorate in such a way? Were white ants a problem? You said that the tenants had been there for years, were they always so reluctant to report maintenance issues? I put it to you that the majority of tenants don't behave in this way, we are people just ordinary people who mostly just want to live quietly in a home that is well maintained like any body else. I can't know why these tenants acted the way they did but all the tenants I know (and that's quite a few) would much prefer to have things fixed promptly without fuss so they can go on living in peace. Unfortunately not many of us hav had the luxury of maintenance being carried out promptly if at all.
      • Tammy N 10 days ago
        That is assuming they do something about it when you report it. When it is ignored after reporting and continued to be ignored for a further 3 inspections it makes you wonder what they are bothering with the inspections for in the first place.
        • Allyoz 9 days ago
          Quite agree. Agent asked were there any maintenance items during the last inspection so naturally, I responded, genuinely, "Other than the items found at the last two inspections that are yet to be addressed?" The favoured response I receive these days is "I've passed it onto the landlords and there's nothing I can do if they don't want to proceed." Am I wrong in assuming this is a common tactic? There does seem to be a barrage of strategies to have tenants agree and comply with even the most bizarre and outrageous claims. The latest for us is the LL no longer wants to pass on the solar credits as they wish to recoup the original installation costs, according to the agent. Sending a fabricated invoice, stating it is the original electricity companies invoice, without even trying to get the fonts the same.
    • Angela Ballard 12 days ago
    • Fc35 2 days ago
      How the tenant is behaving??? it's not about tenant behaviour, its about inspecting the property for maintenance & to check that the tenant is meeting their obligations.It's not about 'tenant behaviour'
  • Morto 4 days ago
    As a landlord, if you look after your tenants they will work with you. Tenants rights must be respected along with that of the Landlord. 48 hours to a week should be enough to gain access. Sometimes tenants can't get there so work with them. s landlords we must see passed the untidiness when we inspect. Tenants have lives too and sometimes it's tough to keep up with day to day chores. Damage is a different thing and if owned up to quickly can solve a lot of issues coming forward.
  • cantab 4 days ago
    most of the problems would be solved by less power to property managers and more agreement with tenants, as it stands many Tenants won't stand up to the PM's because of treats to list them with the likes of ticker which will stop them getting another rental, good Tenants need to be included in planning when things go wrong. And bad Tenants need to have more common sense laws brought to bear on them before they can do more damage.
    • Mikaelas93 4 days ago
      Removed by moderator.
  • 22QLD 6 days ago
    I have been in the current rental for 8+years and it has only been the last 1-1.5 years I have had issues with the real estate. The first was when they did not turn up to a scheduled inspection and then placed the blame on me for them not turning up. They began taking pictures of the rooms during the inspection without notification and when I complained that it was a breach of privacy, they stated that it was part of their policy to use for reviewing the condition of the walls/floors. Inspections have increased from 6mth inspections to 3mth inspections. In addition, previously I was able to reschedule the inspections to the afternoon so I can be available for the inspections but now have been advised all inspections will be carried out between 9-11am. There is a lack of communication and privacy for tenants. I think 6 monthly inspections with contact in between to discuss maintenance issues is reasonable
  • Me ST 11 days ago
    If the minimum notice periods with a level of flexibility are followed than the current practice is good.
  • Sanch 11 days ago
    I ma an owner, and for all of these reasons, wont use an agent. My exoerience, both as a tenant, and owner. Is that agents have no respect for either.I have great respect for my tenants and would not do anything to compromise their right to live in their home comfortably.We never crash their privacy and always attend promptly to repairs. We therefore have great and happy tenants, and we are very happy Landlords.
    • unhappy renter 6 days ago
      If only there were more owners like you Sanch. Perhaps being on the other side as a tenant has made you aware of how unfair the balance of power is. I am personally not interested in power plays, I only want to live a quiet life happy in the knowledge I'm considered a valued tenant. The agency who has taken over in the last year has made that impossible with numerous intrusions on my privacy, threats and bullying. I have a good property owner too and he has sorted out most of these issues, but they continue to harass (they like to win) and I'm loathe to contact him every five minutes to complain about them. It has been useless to complain to the RTA or Qstars as they always make sure they are one step inside the law. I now feel that I'm considered a troublemaker by these organisations as I don't have the gift of the gab like these agents do. I feel like I'm being ground into the dirt and have no choice but to leave and find another place to rent, even though I had been happy here for 4 years with no issues of the previous agent and no need to continually contact the owner. At 64 years old I shouldn't have to be put in this position.
    • BronwynJ 6 days ago
      I agree Sanch that there are agents out there that do the wrong thing. I think professional standards in the industry need to be lifted. However, there are plenty of agents who do the right thing as well. What is needed is a better enforcement of the rules to ensure all property managers are obeying the laws.
      • Sanch 6 days ago
        Bronwyn J, I moved to SE Qld some years ago aged in my mid 50's. I rented a house in Petrie Tce from a very reputable Agent who treated me like an absolute Moron. I was seated alone in a room and forced to watch an excruciating Video on 'How to live in your Rental Property as a good Tenant'.,The Owner of the Property and his GIRLFRIEND made regular appearances at the House, in order to attend to 'This or That' whenever they felt like it. She would stand in the doorway and give patronisng looks at my things. I moved out after 3 months, bought a place and then another, and life moves forward.At no stage EVER did that Agency approach me about purchasing a Property, there being an ( incorrect) assumption that as a Renter I was Scum, and would therefore not ever be in a situation where I may buy.I was left with a very bad taste in my mouth about Rental Property Managers in SE Qld, and in the intervening 12 years, little has been done to change that opinion.I am not sure from where these attitudes come, I know there are some awful Landlords. I rented from one who was as good as his Agent. Awful.
  • heyemilyhay 12 days ago
    I've never had a bad inspection experience in QLD - property managers have been friendly and respectful. I did have a terrible experience with a landlord who barged in on me in my underwear once in NZ - he had not given us an entry notice, and let himself in when I ignored his knocks (I was unwell and not expecting anyone!)
  • AnneN 11 days ago
    In our last rental property at our end of lease term, we had our rental agency provide an entry notice to us for them to view the house to prospective tenants. We tried to negotiate with them as it was on the same day that we were moving out, the removal company was going to be there and the place was a mess. We later found out it was advertised as an open house viewing and that multiple people would be going through the property. I then rang the RTA and they advised that "as per the RTA guidelines an "Open House Viewing is only acceptable with written agreement from the tenants". We advised our Rental Agency that we did not agree to them opening the house up for inspection to multiple viewers. There response was this: We are aware of the legislation and if any tenant is not happy with the an open showing, we escort people individually as a private inspection. The time is on the internet so we can have the groups arrive at one time, rather than issuing you with many entry notices for multiple throughout the vacating process. I then got in contact with the customer service at the head of the Agency and they advised me of the following: "as you are outside the guidelines of the RTA you do not have the right to enter the property with multiple prospective tenants as this is still an Open House Viewing even when showing the property one tenant at a time".I also spoke to the RTA again regarding their comment and they advised the following: I have been in contact with the RTA again, and they have confirmed that even if you attempt to show multiple prospective tenants through as a private inspection, as they will have all arrived at the same time and will be waiting outside, according to the RTA this is still classed as an "Open House Viewing". We stuck a breach of notice on the door that day and I have it in writing that they still went ahead with entering the property and showing multiple people through, this whole conversation was through email so I have it in writing that this agency does not respect your privacy and does not respect the RTA guidelines when it comes to entry practices.From this experience, most real estate rental agencies feel that they have the right to enter the property whenever they feel like it, even if it goes against the RTA guidelines and the tenants written permission. Note: This was a highly popular rental agency, and given this experience, I will never rent with this agency again. I feel that there needs to be stricter guidelines when allowing access to your property as a renter, as it currently feels like you have no rights and the real estate will just go ahead and do what they please.
    • Cathe_78 11 days ago
      And that's before you even get to the property owners. In one place I rented, I wondered if I was going insane for a while because, every week or so, I'd come home to find something changed or moved in the garden. Now, I was paying a mowing company to keep the grass tidy and was trying my best to keep up with the weeding and watering myself. What I didn't realise was that the owners lived in the same street - and that they felt entitled to fiddle about in the garden whenever they wanted (this was eventually confirmed to me via a phone call, but the owners never went into the garden when I was actually home – they always waited for when I went out). I don't THINK they did anything inside the house, but I was always a little on edge (and keeping half an eye out for changes inside the house as well).
    • Allyoz 8 days ago
      We experienced exactly the same at our last rental property although, being new to renting I didn't know about the rules and that I could get advice from the RTA about my position. So, I complained strongly to the showing agent while people were walking through my home. Oh, and did they retaliate to that! Trying to hold bond over a crack in the tiles the size less than a five cent piece, which I proved was not visible on entry (luckily I'd noted the filthy tiles) as I had obviously cleaned the dirt out of the already existing mark. Oh dear, the RTA were great with helping me with that horrible experience. The real estate agent was on the phone, shouting and threatening. What an awful experience! We left the place in such great condition, better than entry, that it was being rented a week later.
  • Bel 6 days ago
    : I think if tenants were treated with genuine respect then entry wouldn't be an issue. I don't trust land agents at all...they warrant very little trust for ethics or integrity IMHO as their priority appears to be what they can get from the tenants be it money or a sense of power over...so if someone wanted to come in for something (and I have in the past allowed this) with very little notice, (in my mind its even better than an inspection in that it is how it is...no one stressed to clean everything as though the blooming queen mother is arriving ... surely wether my bed is made or I have put the dishes away is unimportant but wrecking walls or trashing doors is important)...then I am ok with it but I have been caught with complaints that something wasn't tidy enough... In my experience this power hungry )^% of making tenants feel like they are low beings because some landagent with a power kick thinks they can judge you on your housework skills yet ignore serious issues you as a tenant may be having is ridiculously frustrating and why tenants want lots of time ... I have had a few traumas with this in some rentals I feel very strong about it
  • Bel 6 days ago
    Removed by moderator.
  • Challenged 19 days ago
    I understand the need to inspect a property but having someone open cupboards and pry through personal belongings in unacceptable!
  • Over it 6 days ago
    Recently a good friend with a longterm rental tenant took up smoking drugs their house had to be cleaned it took over week all soft furnishing carpets and even part of walls had to be removed I understand 3 months is annoying for tenants but this was devastating for my friends they also trusted this tenant after so many years.I am a fair landlord who does believe in tenants rights however I will not tolerate my home being made unsafe for my future tenants.
  • Over it 6 days ago
    My main concern about my home that is rented out is not pets as I love fur babies but tenants who have a meth drug habit no one wants to have a toxic environment for future tenants and clean up costs are massive and scary to handle as a owner, drugs in a rental property is unfortunately not even discussed in this forum we are all so worried about entry to properties, pets and good and bad tenants no one has even hit on the issue of keeping our rental properties safe for our future tenants. People who smoke or cook meth are yes humans beings that need help but at what cost to innocent future tenants or landlords, but I do not want my home ruined and becoming toxic, one thing a friend that is a property manager told me was small minority of good tenants can be great for a long time then take up smoke meth drug and it is a downhill slide it is truly sad but destructive for owners.If not for this issue for me I would only do a property check once a year for a long term tenant.This is a hidden discussion not mentioned by anyone in future rental tenant rights.All tenants have the right to a toxic free environment and I intend to excess my rights as a owner to protect my future tenants by not allow meth to be smoked in my home.
  • MarieC 7 days ago
    In general, tenants are treated like inferior citizens in the rental market in Queensland and in other states. I have been a renter my whole life (including my parents being renters in childhood). I am now aged 56, so have lots of experience of many kinds in the rental market, and expect to be a renter for the rest of my life.My view of the current situation with regards entry to rental properties is that a tenant's 'quiet enjoyment' of the property (for which they pay ever increasing rental prices), is mostly respected very little by owners and agents, or the current law. For example, wherever possible I try to be a long term tenant (presuming the owner doesn't sell, which has happened increasingly over the decades as the property market has become more and more investment oriented). I have a very good record with cleanliness and care of properties. But, even after years and years of being in a place, with all inspections coming up A-OK, I routinely have to endure inspections every three months. This is essentially an ongoing money making activity for agents, for which owners also bear the cost. I think routine inspections should start at every six months, then become every year after the first year or two with no problems. At some point in a long tenancy, and where there have been no problems with a tenant's care of the property, there should be no further need for inspections at all, as the tenant is quite capable of letting an agent or owner know if there are maintenance issues.I also think a rental property should be vacated before prospective renters are allowed in to view the property. Having hoardes of strangers wandering through your home is the absolute opposite of 'quiet enjoyment'. It also happens at a time of stress, great expense and upheaval for a tenant. Why should the continuity of rental income for an owner be given such high priority over a tenant's rights to have peace in the property they are paying for? As it stands, we are paying rent and having the space we are paying for invaded as well.In terms of non-urgent entry to the property, I can't see any real need for the notice to be less than a week, and I think the grounds for entry should have to be very pressing or else not happen at all without the tenant's agreement. In general, I think agents/owners should leave a tenant in peace in the property they pay for to be their home.
  • Steve g 17 days ago
    Entry needs to be more often to check on maintenance issues etc
  • Van 9 days ago
    I am a tenant. My agent has recently taken to sending me a copy of the routine inspection report. It's quite eye-opening. The disclaimer at the beginning specifically states that the report is visual only, carried out to assess the way the tenant is maintaining the property. The disclaimer then goes on to stipulate that the property manager is not qualified to assess structural aspects.Based on that, it would be unwise for landlords to assume the managing agent can alert you to major problems. They're real estate agents, not qualified architects or builders. They can pick up obvious problems, as anyone could, but it's doubtful that agents would have the expertise to pick up anything else. These quarterly inspections are primarily about checking up on the tenant. I think that once you've proved yourself to be a clean and reliable tenant, inspections should reduce in frequency. Quarterly is invasive and reminds me, yet again, that it's not really my home.
    • JaniceAC 7 days ago
      The agent is quite correct in their disclaimer. They are not qualified building inspectors and will only comment on obvious visual items. A building inspector would probably take 2-4 hours to inspect an average 3 brm home. Owner costs would escalate and a tenant would complain at the length of time they were present for this inspection.
      • Van 7 days ago
        I agree that they are correct with the disclaimer, however a lot of people on this thread seem to think that the routine inspections performed by agents are about maintenance. My point is that apart from problems that are visually obvious, no agent is going to be able to pick up on all maintenance issues. The purpose of these inspections must therefore be to check up on the tenant.As a tenant, I can't comment on how I'd feel about the costs of a building inspection, however I wouldn't object to some kind of professional building inspection being carried out every so often. It would benefit me, as I want to live in a safe place - and it should be the right of every tenant to live in a safe place. It wouldn't have to be done as often as agent inspections. I'm not sure what the recommended timeframe would be, but maybe every two years? I'd consider that reasonable.
      • unhappy renter 7 days ago
        I was always lead to believe that the inspections were about ensuring the tenant is not damaging the property and to provide them with an opportunity to report any maintenance issues. I agree with Lildei nothing gets done from one inspection to the next. They come, take their photos and leave. Three months later they repeat the process. Nobody expects them to be building inspectors or architects so why then do property managers expect tenants to be building inspectors? We're supposed to know when things aren't right and need fixing, some people do but many young people who are inexperienced in life do not and they are criticised for something you have just admitted property managers are not.
    • bartj 7 days ago
      My understanding of maintenance inspections, has always been that they're intended for the agent to inspect the property for maintenance issues, not simply that it is being maintained by the tenant - this means that it's as much for the tenant to discuss maintenance issues, as it is for the agent to inspect them. This seems like an area that needs clarification to me, although it probably seems like a trivial distinction. Once again, this is an area that is treated dramatically different, by different agents; I've had friends who have been told by an agent that they need to re-clean an oven, re-mop floors, etc. because they're not pristine for an inspection - to me this unacceptable, it is not a cleanliness inspection. Of course, if there are cleanliness issues that will lead to permanent damage, like rotting carpets or moldy ceilings, then this would be acceptable to address. I've personally had an agent insist that it's my responsibility to clean gutters and prune overhanging tree branches on maintenance inspections - in this case, where the gutters were full and trees overgrown at the beginning of our lease. There needs to be more clarity for agents and tenants about their areas of responsibility.
  • Van 7 days ago
    I see a lot of agents and owners on this thread who have clearly been burned by bad tenants and are therefore reluctant to inspect properties less often. I know that you must see some absolutely terrible examples of human behaviour. But tenants are not all like that. My guess is the majority of us are at least good tenants. Yet we are all treated as if we are going to trash the property at any moment. It's a kind of stereotyping and prejudice, and a lot of what rubs me up the wrong way about being a renter. I pay my rent on time and look after the property I rent. I have often been complimented for leaving the property in better condition than when I arrived. However, I am still inspected by a stranger every three months, often at a time and/or a date that's not convenient for me, with no power to reschedule. These inspections cause me a lot of anxiety. I have to ask for permission to have pets or hang pictures and certificates up on the wall. When I have lived in properties that go up for sale, I am treated as if I am a nuisance or don't exist.When I try so hard to be a responsible tenant, yet get treated like I'm not, I am discouraged and slightly humiliated. If I feel like I have no control over where I live, it doesn't feel like a home. I feel like I'm putting all this effort in and getting nothing back. The system should recognise good tenants, acknowledge that the property they rent is their home and ensure that all renters are treated with respect.We're all dependent on each other. You provide us housing. You need us to pay the rent and look after the property. If we feel like we can make the place our own, we are more likely to consider it a home rather than a roof over our heads. Happy renters who live in a home and feel respected are more likely to look after your property. (Long-term tenancies will also make a place feel more like home, but I'm already straying off topic so I'll leave it there.)
  • Pam4 17 days ago
    Owners need to be able to inspect often enough to pick up on routine and preventative maintenance. Tenants do not always report maintenance or may not notice things like leaf build up in gutters, loose glass in old houses, as a property manager I found damp carpet in a units bedroom. There was a leak coming through the wall from the shower tenant hadn't noticed the dampness at all . Carpet was able to be salvaged but if it had been left any longer it would have cost more to fix.