Entry practices and privacy

13 days ago
The Open Doors to Renting Reform community consultation has now closed. Thank you for having your say on how we can improve renting in Queensland.

Tell us what you think:

  • What is your experience of entry to rental properties in Queensland?
  • How balanced are rights of entry and rights to privacy in Queensland rental properties?
  • What do you think are reasonable periods and reasons for entry to a rental property?

The Open Doors to Renting Reform community consultation has now closed. Thank you for having your say on how we can improve renting in Queensland.

  • Rodinqld 13 days ago
    Seems I'm not the only one with issues about inspection frequency and general happy snaps taken of every habitable space. It is my understanding tenants permission is required for general room shots taken for no apparent good reason however in the absence of infringement penalties all RTA legislation is little more than a toothless tiger agents can afford to be blase about.Inspections every 3 months may be fair and reasonable if there's a need to monitor the behaviour of some people who may desire to live in squalor however for the majority of tenants they're time wasting impositions which are little more than an invasion of privacy.The act needs to be amended to enable quarterly inspections "IF THE TENANTS CIRCUMSTANCES PRESCRIBE...", or some such legalese to enable good decent reputable tenants to challenge the frequency when not required.
  • PotteringAlong 13 days ago
    I think the biggest change I'd like to see with entry practices is removing the automatic right of owners/agents/tradies to enter a tenant's home without the tenant being present. If a homeowner asked a tradie to complete a job at their home, they would negotiate a mutually convenient time, and the homeowner would be present. Why is it different for tenants? Yes, tenants are given advance notice so that they can be present if they wish to be (for both inspections and maintenance) - but they are usually not given the option to negotiate a mutually convenient time if they wish to be present but the stated time is unsuitable for them. It's really about respect - giving the tenant the option to choose whether or not they want to be present, and scheduling a suitable time together. I also acknowledge that some tenants may not respond to messages, or create endless delays - so perhaps an initial notice asking the tenant to contact the agent/tradie to arrange a suitable time within the next two weeks, otherwise the agent will schedule the appointment (and confirm to the tenant in writing), and arrange access. Obviously urgent repairs are a very different situation, but my suggestion should cover most of the routine entry notices. For inspections, I would like to see less frequent inspections for longer-term tenants. We email maintenance issues through as they arise, and I prefer having that record, because the resolution rate of maintenance issues we raise at inspection can be pretty patchy! I have been shocked to read about the photography/privacy issue - the only photographs our agents take is of any upcoming or recently completed work, and they only email it to the owners. The next issue I have with inspections is the lack of clarity about exactly what is being inspected. My understanding is that the landlords are checking that the house is clean and in good repair - however different landlords/agents have very different interpretations of "clean". One friend had an agent stand over her stating that she should really wait and watch until my friend removed the handprint from the glass sliding door. With three young children, she could remove the handprint and there would be a new one there within five minutes! Another friend, who was caring for her very ill husband, was very firmly instructed to remove the tiny weeds/grass that had grown up in the cracks between the pavers on her driveway. It's stories like these that can make renting miserable. Strangers coming into your home, criticising your housekeeping without regard for your personal circumstances, and the background fear that if you don't meet their standards, this might not be your home for much longer. We have also had "drive by" inspections of our yard, unrelated to official Inspections, where we have been asked to mow or to trim plants - and from talking with other tenants, it seems that our experience is not uncommon. These drive-bys weren't for the purpose of checking up on us - the agents were simply passing by, noticed that our yard needed attention, and asked us to fix it. However, I do find it a little intrusive, especially as our yard is never excessively overgrown - these times have been after an ongoing period of rain (our suburb seems to get a lot more rain than neighbouring suburbs), or one of those unpleasant family illnesses that gets passed around from person to person. A slightly-unkempt garden may not be visually attractive, but it's hardly an urgent maintenance issue, unless there are trees overhanging the roof/gutter - and that should have been addressed in the inspection.
  • Sharlene 14 days ago
    Agents need to be more flexible in arranging times for inspections. General photographs should not be allowed as it is an invasion of privacy. More consideration needs to be made for tenants that have current domestic violence orders. I had agents try to force an entry into the premises with people unnamed on the entry notice showing prospective tenants, delivered by hand to different areas around the property each time. The only reason I had to leave the property was because I was evicted without grounds for not signing a new lease 10 days in to a 3 month lease.
  • nadine Hamilton-Smith 14 days ago
    also to restrictive,too invasive and RENT TOO HIGH !!!!!sick and tired of reading about investors issues, suck it up at least you still have a home too live in !!!!!there is a thing called insurance!!!!
  • Rodney J Saverin 15 days ago
    I have a Smoke Detector inspection yearly. I hate the guy that comes and does the inspection. He is rude and always late. He arrives outside the appointed time specified on entry document, but thereafter still wants to do the job. Always installing new detectors. But not where the old ones were, but in a new spot. He leaves the base plate of old detector on the ceiling as well. He has done that twice now. They look out of place. Makes the unit look partly like a slum. Tenants should be able to forbid tradespeople that have been rude and unapologetic to them in the past. As evident from past altercations with the tradeperson he don't like me. Hence nothing stopping him in future inspections planting some illegal substance within my premises. After doing so reporting me to the police to be searched. Tentanst should have rights to forbid entry to tradespeople that are knowing rude hostile to them.
  • limbo 2 months ago
    legally inspections can be carried out with the tenant not being in attendance.entry without the tenant being in attendance is a gross invasion of privacy.some agencies outsource third party companies to perform regular inspections. in effect i am allowing an unknown person into my home with me being there. this is unnerving and a potential avenue for theft and the 'inspection' of truly private things such as my medicine cabinet and my underwear drawer.
    Hide Replies (32)
    • limbo 2 months ago
      oops... *without me being there*
    • Lillian 2 months ago
      I cannot understand this. All Agents should be a respectable group.
      Hide Replies (4)
      • irtapil 2 months ago
        should be, but there are always bad apples in any profession.
        Hide reply (1)
        • GeorgeZedd 15 days ago
          I agree, but my experience clearly shows that there are far more many bad tenants than there are landlords. Where do bad tenants sit on the Image of Professions list?
      • John Beevors about 2 months ago
        Roy Morgan has been conducting a survey since, I think, the mid 70s called "Image of Professions". Have a look at that and see where real estate agents sit - third last, just ahead of the advertising industry with used car salesmen at the bottom.
      • Chmiroau 24 days ago
        Seriously, I have never met a good agent who has both the renters and landlords interest in mind.
    • reacon 2 months ago
      Removed by moderator.
    • ruralsue 2 months ago
      When I have rented the inspections have always been worked around my work times so I could be present. I also saw it as a chance to point out any concerns. Perhaps property managers need to reconsider their inspection schedules. Maybe they could work on a Saturday then have Monday off and maybe start midday and go until 8:00pm. This seems like a solvable issue with common sense. I agree I would not want someone I do not know to be in my property without me. As an owner I pay a fee for a property manager and expect they should reasonably accommodate the tenants.
      Hide Replies (16)
      • irtapil 2 months ago
        When i get an inspection notice i feel like rescheduling isn't an option. They're usually worded as "if you are not home, we'll let ourselves in."
        Hide Replies (8)
        • Van 2 months ago
          The last two agents I've rented through have specifically stated "Due to time restraints and schedules, the time on the entry notice cannot be changed." This is completely unreasonable. I've had inspections scheduled in my study vacation week and for when I was away. The real estate agents left my front security screen door unlocked after the latter inspection. (The glass sliding door was locked, but leaving anything unlocked after an inspection is unacceptable.) I didn't find out until I got home over two days later. Fortunately nothing happened, but it did make me wonder if I would have been covered by insurance if someone had burgled the place.
          Hide reply (1)
          • Seaside about 1 month ago
            Similar thing happened to me - the agent left my bathroom window open and left it open while I wasn’t home.
        • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
          Mine were always worded to the effect ‘you don’t need to be home for the inspection as we will let ourselves in’. They encouraged tenants not to be there. That’s what they want. Unsupervised access.
          Hide Replies (3)
          • irtapil about 2 months ago
            yeah, if we have any right to object they certainly don't want us to know that. Even if they agreed to a reschedule i'd not feel safe being out of the house at the originally allotted time.
            Hide reply (1)
            • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
              That’s so true. It’s always an anxious time for me when they reschedule as they have, in the past, still turned up at the original time.
          • Jim640 17 days ago
            It is actually easier for the person doing the inspection if the tenant is there because problems can be discussed before any breaches are issued. That is better for everyone. If the tenant is home it also avoids accusations of theft. I work in social housing where we conduct thousands of inspections. We always prefer the tenant to be home, so we will reschedule of the tenants makes contact, but we must have the ability to enter if they are not home to keep on top of the inspections and to ensure problems are dealt with properly throughout the tenancy. If a property is in good order the inspection can be over in 5-10 minutes. Cameras are now very cheap (some less than $30) and easy to set up. If you have concerns I would encourage you to use them.
        • Shillings about 1 month ago
          I recently waited for a PM to do a scheduled property inspection — I had a new agent and wanted to meet my PM — he didn’t arrive. I waited another few hours, then went to bed to catch up on some sleep in the afternoon. I was woken by somebody letting himself in through my front door! I yelled out for him to go away, he said he was ‘just doing the property inspection’. I said he was too late, go away. He left without re-locking the door. I later sent a notice of breach asking for an apology or explanation. No reply. Same agent had posted photos of my possessions on their website when my flat was recently sold. I complained about that to RTA who investigated and issued them with a warning. All the rules in the world don’t make a jot of difference if people just don’t give a hoot. Same agent sent me an email request to like them on Facebook! Hah!
        • Peterqld 27 days ago
          I believe you should always be present during an inspection, and I dislike General Photos being taken. If you want to take a Photo of a problem no worries; other than that it's none of your business what furniture or possessions I have keep your nose out.
      • JaniceAC 2 months ago
        Why doesn’t the tenant take a couple of hours off so the inspection can be carried out during 8-5 work hours. Property Managers would like to have a normal home life too.
        Hide Replies (4)
        • irtapil about 2 months ago
          not everyone can take time off work at short notice, and i have a medical condition which requires seeing specialists, i might have an appointment booked months in advance that will take months to rebook and/or cost me $100 to reschedule.
        • Nessemd 24 days ago
          Taking time off is not an option for me and I haven’t been here that long but I’ve had 2 inspections the first one they let my cat in to my bedroom and then locked it in the shut up bedroom with no food water or toilet on a 43 degree hot day my cat nearly died and when I queried the agent she said that it went in there so she thought that’s where it belonged. I explained that’s not the case and that’s why I tried to reschedule the appointment and was told to buy if I don’t like renting. The other time they left my back sliding door unlocked and open thankfully no one broke in. Even after all this they refuse to reschedule appointments
        • Chmiroau 24 days ago
          Because we are paying for the accomodation, we are in effect paying the agents wages. If they don't like the job, get another one. As you can see by all of the other messages, it is a respect thing and a privacy thing. We as tenants fill out endless forms and we don't have a clue about the person inspecting where we live.
        • Von 15 days ago
          How many days off would you like us to have off each year. I have added up inspections and maintenance entries over one year and they amounted to 20 because we stupidly moved into a new property which had warranty issues to fix. Property managers need to understand the job they are doing requires odd hours and days and be respectful that tenants are paying for the quiet possession of the property and this means some courtesy and respect from property managers.
      • PM GC about 1 month ago
        I agree there is a lot of trust when it comes to having an agent come through to inspect. I really don't like 3rd party inspections and prefer someone from the agency to come through. It's also not nice when it's a different agent each time. Being sensitive to the needs of individuals is an important part of being an agent.
      • Chmiroau 24 days ago
        Do you have any properties that I may rent, it is very rare for us to find a landlord that cares about their tenants this much.
    • GeeGee 2 months ago
      Have you had tradies going through your medicine cabinet or underwear drawer? I'm sure that could be reported to the police.
      Hide Replies (4)
      • Fc35 about 2 months ago
        no body is interested in anybody's underwear drawer or medicine cabinet (insert eye roll here), be at home for the inspection or have a trusted friend or relative available if you are that concerned.
        Hide Replies (2)
        • irtapil about 2 months ago
          sometime people can't be home, and not everyone has someone they trust who can be, if all of their family work or if they've new in town.
        • Cathe_78 about 2 months ago
          You need to meet some of my previous landlords...
      • irtapil about 2 months ago
        the police are not going to do anything about it unless something gets stolen, and even then they might be difficult to get any help from unless it's a very valuable item or a break and enter, and a routine inspection wouldn't count as a break and enter
    • Property Landlord about 1 month ago
      The agent looking after our property told me they can only look under the kitchen sink for any possible leaks and the same with the bathroom vanity. They are not permitted to look into any cupboards, drawers, wardrobes, etc. so if you suspect that happening, you need to speak to the agent & voice your concerns.
    • Jim640 17 days ago
      In the UK where landlords can't enter without the tenants permission, there is a huge problem with tenants avoiding every inspection by going out or just refusing entry. When the tenants eventually leave it becomes obvious why they didn't want inspections. We don't want the same situation here. Landlords must the have ability to enter at an agreed time/date and complete and inspection. Tenants should be afforded reasonable flexibility, but bad tenants will play the system to avoid getting any inspections at all if landlords can't enter without them there. I am strongly in favour of tenants using cameras when inspections are carried out in their absence. These days that are very cheap and easy to set up.
    • Goldn1 16 days ago
      The taking of pictures which has all belongings in them what if they land in the wrong hands Its a theifs dream come true having all available information and pictures
  • GeorgeZedd 15 days ago
    I leave my tenants alone as long as there are no problems, complaints or issues. If there is a sudden rise in breakages, callouts and repairs, I need to inspect the property to try to fix the problem so it doesn't happen again, or see what it is the tenants are doing that may be causing the need for repairs, etc.I should be able to access the property when things do go wrong, as well as conducting regular inspections to make sure all is in order. This should not be capped or restricted to make it impossible to access a property to carry out repairs or to survey the condition of the property. I think a lot of common problems relating to tenant complaints about faults with water, electricity, etc could be avoided if landlords could inspect and enter premises to see what repairs or maintenance are needed.
  • Von 15 days ago
    Entry practices. Real EG: Friday entry will be between 8am and 530pm for a smoke detector check. I won't allow agent to simply give a key to any stranger to enter the premises with me not there so this means that I have to be available all day for this entry. The smoke detector tradesman did not even arrive at site until 930a.m. and when I rang the company to ask for a running sheet for time he would do my place was told Oh he will just come in with a key. We should have the right to allow this or not!! We should be given a choice and then told an approx time for entry not a full day. Monday after Friday; Entry for Pest Control. Have a dog so need to arrange to be around to control dog while Pest Control is being done as instructed by Real Estate Manager. Entry time for pest Control 8am to 530pm. Another day I have to be at home all day not knowing when the Pest Control will be done. Pest Control operator arrives at 1130a.m. and does inside only. I ask when are you doing outside? Oh I'm spraying all insides of properties in development first and then coming back to do outside after. I say I'm waiting to keep dog out of your way can you not do it know. No you will have to wait. So effectively I have spent two days managing Pest Control and Smoke detector maintenance for owners of properties because as tenants we firstly don't have to be told when they are coming and then assumptions are made that you will be happy to have a stranger enter your home whenever they like. This needs to change. First we need to be asked if we are happy to have entry with a key given out. Next we need to be given a approx time for entry not a full day and two full days in one week. Would Landlords be happy if the same happened to them. Strangers having full access to their homes and entering any time they want! NO!!!!
  • cjasdf 15 days ago
    I am a long term tenant and I hate how my agency says roughly every three months but it can also happen outside of these terms. I also HATE the fact that when an inspection notice is given I am only given 7 days warning. I like to take pride in my home, but if I am working this isn't enough time to get the house to a good state I will be happy for them to come and inspect. I even had one instance where neighbours were complaining about us because we have young boys with a disability and because of all the noises they rang my real estate in which case they did an impromptu 7 day notice inspection to check if the neighbours complaints were true. It wasn't but it was very distressing.
  • Grammarfun 15 days ago
    My propety manage told me that apart from 3 monthly inspections, the only grounds on which an owner can enter a property (not even the grounds let lone the inside) is if it is connected to maintenance. What she meant that the need for a repair had been identified and on that basis the owner could enter.Is this true?
  • APD 15 days ago
    Its pretty pathetic that after long term renting the property manager feels a need to keep up 3 monthly inspectons. Don't get me started on the agents that put the place on the market straight after you move in and want to bring people through every weekend and complain about all your junk while they're in your ridiculously over priced rental home with no storage space.
  • Tania M 15 days ago
    If you are a good tenant and have had no issues at any of your 3 monthly inspections in the first year then I think the inspections should become 6 monthly and possibly yearly for even longer periods of occupancy. And I also believe there needs to be more flexibility with inspection scheduling. Tenants should have the right to be present or at least be consulted about scheduling rather than told. There should be some 'time of day' concessions for night shift workers or people with illness that may require different sleeping patterns to the 9-5pm workers schedule.
  • Rupert 2 months ago
    The current balance between rights of entry and rights to privacy is fine. Many agents do not understand the difference between rights of entry and obligation to entry, therefore they have been telling tenants that inspections every 3 months are required by law. I am an onsite manager and I know every tenants in my building, therefore there is no need for an inspection every 3 months for most of the tenants. But tenants are not always the person they claim they are. A longer notice period will give too much time to the tenants who are conducting illegal businesses in the property to hide evidence. The insurance is expected to go up if the rights of entry is further restricted, as the risk associated with the increased difficulties to identify breaches and mitigate loss will go up. With more costs to the landlords, the rent will also be transferred upon all tenants. Good tenants should not suffer from the increased living costs just because of the unreasonably increased level of protection given to few bad tenants. Therefore, current entry practices should be maintained, with more educations to landlords and agents that the inspections are not absolutely necessary to be carried out that frequently.
    Hide Replies (13)
    • irtapil 2 months ago
      yeah, as far as i gather the three month thing was supposed to be a maximum but it seems to have become standard. A week of notice is ok for inspections, some flexibility in timing would be more useful.More than 24 hours notice for non emergency maintenance is needed though, unless the tenant themselves demands the issue get seen to ASAP.
      Hide Replies (5)
      • JaniceAC 2 months ago
        Why should a tenant be able to demand that maintenance be attended to ASAP when an owner can’t?
        Hide Replies (4)
        • homelesswithpets 2 months ago
          Um JaniceAC perhaps the maintenance issue that they want tended to ASAP is a safety or security issue. I know if I had a concern that was safety or security related I’d want it seen to ASAP too
          Hide reply (1)
          • Fc35 about 2 months ago
            Safety and security issues are dealt with under the act as emergency repairs so doesn't apply to this scenario.
        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          Duh! because the tenant is the one living in the property and it is directly affectedly them!
        • Cathe_78 about 2 months ago
          Well, when the water damage is visibly increasing day by day, or the door lock has broken, or the toilet keeps backing up, or when the aircon breaks in the middle of a heat wave... It's amazing how prepared some property owners are to ignore these things when it's not their health and safety on the line...
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      Insurance increases without evidence is rentseeking! in the wider system the inspections regime is clockwork and integrated in agent systems. I convinced my landlord to drop the number of inspections for tenants he is really chuffed with and it was not easy to do because the agents are on this 3 monthly thing that bears not relationship to anything but marketing and box ticking . I argue for inspections regimes built upon relationships and knowledge, not a blanket system that penalises most for the very few (2 %) who do wrong (evidenced by bond returns)
    • bartj about 2 months ago
      I've dealt with about a dozen agents over the last 15 years, for everyone of those agents, at some stage I've had to explain at least one area of the residential tenancy law that they were applying incorrectly. Some have required me contacting the RTA to clarify the law, but most I've been able to understand from simply reading the act. The training required to become and continue to work as a residential agent appears to be hugely inadequate.
      Hide Replies (5)
      • bartj about 2 months ago
        I think if most property owners were aware of the incompetence of many agents that manage their properties, they'd be appalled.
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        • Van about 2 months ago
          I agree, bartj. I do believe that responsible owners would be appalled at the awful way some agents have treated me. I actually believe that there should be some way the tenant can contact the landlord if there is a problem with the agent, perhaps via the RTA so that the landlord's privacy can be protected but the renter can still get in touch. Otherwise, how would the owner have any idea what the agent is doing in their name?
          Hide Replies (3)
          • bartj about 2 months ago
            Absolutely agree. I had an incident a few years ago with our agent who was trying to introduce a whole list of "special terms" when we were renewing our lease for the third time. The list was ridiculous and included things that wouldn't have applied to our property, but some that could have left us open to issues later. I spent weeks communicating back and forward, explaining our case, why it was unreasonable and how the conditions were unnecessary under the provisions of the act. Ultimately the agent got nasty and threatened that they would have to issue us notice to vacate. I wrote a letter detailing all of the issues we'd had with the agent over our tenancy, and again why the terms were unnecessary and unreasonable, then sent it to the agent and insisted they share it with owner, so that they were aware what was happening - challenging them on their claim that their actions were inline with what the owner wanted. Amazingly, in a couple of days, we were sent a new lease, no special terms and no more hassles. I don't think they contacted the owner, I think if there were more threat of tenants informing owners of the behaviour of their agents, attitudes might change, at least a bit.
          • Shillings about 1 month ago
            It should be possible to set up some sort of account on a web-based platform that could be accessed by only three people: owner, agent, and tenant. If ALL correspondence about entry, repairs, complaints, etc had to be made through such a platform there’d be a whole lot more transparency for all parties AND there’d be a permanent record in case of disagreement.
            Hide reply (1)
            • CCC 17 days ago
              Some agents use an online system for information about inspections, repairs and maintenance that landlord, tenant, agent can view, and they can see quotes and work orders too
  • Jim640 17 days ago
    Some buildings require fire door and fire alarm inspections at the legislated frequencies. When the contractor does this, all units in a building need to be done at th3e same time. It would be too expensive to move some to different days to suit individual households. In these circumstances it is essential that the contractors can be given access irrespective of whether the tenants are home. It is quite common in social housing to find fire doors and detectors etc. damaged and in need of repair/replacement. If entry was made more difficult to deal with this it could cost someone their life in a fire.
  • Jim640 17 days ago
    Sadly inspections are only necessary because so many tenants fail to look after the properties they are renting to a reasonable and fair standard. It is unfortunate for the good tenants, but a harsh reality of renting. It is reasonable for an owner to want to ensure their investment is not being trashed or used as a meth lab. Good tenants with a good track record can approach their landlord and ask for less frequent inspections. The social housing organisation I work for does this regularly. Good tenants will also find their inspections are very fast. The only tenants with anything to fear from inspections are those that don't look after the property. In Queensland there are already strict rules around the frequency and notice times to protect tenants. Tenants that can't be home and have concerns can request a different date/time (a decent agent will do what they can to help), ask a friend or to neighbour to attend for them or set up cheap cameras to record the inspection visit. Tenants can also use the visit to raise maintenance issues.
  • Jim640 17 days ago
    I work in social housing. It is my experience that tenants that would have been home (they are often unemployed) will purposely go out to avoid the inspection. If we didn't take keys and enter the properties we would not be able to do around 75% of our inspections. Our inspection staff will often find damage or other problems that need addressing. By entering and completing the inspection we are able to ensure the problems are dealt with early rather than letting damage and dirt build up to a point where there is no possibility of the tenants affording to rectify it. This also helps us identify hoarding before it becomes a problem or safety issue. Where we have tenants who look after their properties we switch them from quarterly to 6-monthly inspections which is good for the tenants and for us. It is vital that we can enter a property (with notice). If we didn't we would have a lot of the housing out of action for months at a time between tenancies while we clean up and fix the damage.
  • WBJM 19 days ago
    Agree that many difficulties with owning and renting are due to the shortage of really good agents. A great one is gold and to be treasured.Property inspections should be three monthly at a reasonable time for working families, should be through enough to ensure that maintenance is up to date and adequately reported to owners including photos, avoiding tenant's belongings if at all possible. Inspections should not be done by third party, it is the agent's responsibility. Not looking in cupboards or behind the dirty washing lying on the laundry floor? I have had rat damage occasioned entirely by the tenant's housekeeping habits and pest control inspectors unable to do an adequate check for white ants for the same reason.Tenant's privacy should be respected but they also need to respect the interests of the owner in maintaining the tenant's home in good condition.Agents
  • Nessemd 24 days ago
    I don’t think inspections every 12 weeks are necessary and why are agents allowed to take pictures of all of my stuff every time especially when there are no issues with the property
  • Greg Singh 27 days ago
    I’ve always managed my rental properties (i.e. not used an agent) and I’ve always called the tenants before issuing a form 9 to ask what day and time is convenient for them for a quarterly inspection. I have never conducted an inspection without the tenant present. From what I’ve read so far, it appears that the practices of some real estate agents are more the issue. I can’t see any problem with the current law.
  • Lillian 2 months ago
    Yes that is correct every 3 months and then space them out as one can how tenant is behaving
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    • Pam4 2 months ago
      It is not only about how a tenant is caring for the property it is also to look for wear and tear and preventative maintenance that might need to be done. In an extreme case a deck could deteriorate or a step become loose. Would the owner be held liable if they could inspect less often and the property became unsafe?
      Hide Replies (20)
      • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
        Entirely agree. I did an inspection, the first I had done on that property since it came into my letting pool, and noticed that the carpet did not 'feel' right on one of the stairs. Quick look under the stairs and I found the entire tread had fallen off that and another stair. These two stairs were being held up by carpet alone no wooden treads. This was an accident just waiting to happen. The tenants said it had been like that for some time but they had not reported it to either the previous manager or me. I called a carpenter and had the stairs fixed the same day. I don't know how the owners would have stood legally had there been an accident. Without an inspection this problem would not have been picked up as these tenants were always reluctant to report any maintenance issues.
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        • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
          This is why there needs to be full and proper building inspections at the beginning of a tenancy. Tenants are reluctant because they know from personal experience that a) its likely no-one will bother with the repair and b) if it does get repaired they get an increase in rent. There's no excuse for agents and owners failing to do a proper inspection in between tenancies, and then go blaming the tenants and citing the need for even more inspections. Do inspections properly in the first place - when people have moved out is the most appropriate time to get a building inspection done. As a tenant I reported numerous problems including the very dodgy front stairs not fixed until I told the owner the story about the coroners report on the death of a baby being held by her father who fell through the deck/flooring..In the meantime he was getting his own rebuilt. 2 years of occasional requests, 2 housemates and income lost because of multiple house repair issues not attended to. I know there are great agents and owners but there are some shockers too (and this guy was a great guy...just very stingy). But until there is evidence to link 3 monthly inspections to maintenance improvements there is little justification for the current regime. Agencies need to improve their practices and my suggestion above is a good place to start.
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          • T17 2 months ago
            Angela proper building inspections is not feasible between every tenancy. Who would be willing to pay for this? If a tenant wants one done, should they have to pay? If an Owner has to pay for a report for every tenancy shouldn't be they be able to recoup those costs by putting the rent up with every report seeing as some can cost a few hundred dollars. Not all Owners are flush with cash and some rely on the income for rentals to make ends meet.
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            • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
              perhaps paying for an annual building inspection would be a lot cheaper than 8-9% of rental income to an agent to not pass on maintenance requests to an owner..... that does happen. Owners not keen to pay for inspections may also be the very owners who don't care to maintain the rental place to a decent standard for people to live in....in which case its better they leave the system.
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              • Van 2 months ago
                I had a situation once where the agent didn't report a maintenance problem to the landlord. The upstairs neighbour complained about a blockage in their shower drain, but nothing was done until the water leaked through my ceiling and through a light fitting, tripping an electrical safety switch and knocking out my lights. The same agent didn't bother to let me know that it was safe to turn the electricity back on once the leak was fixed. I think a good chunk of problems with renting are caused by poor agents who cause communication blocks between tenants and owners.
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                • Angela Ballard 30 days ago
                  So my research findings show.
              • Marie2402 about 2 months ago
                Angela, I totally disagree with your whole statement. Properties age constantly...they need that check every 3 months. You pay for your car to be serviced, and checked by their age and mileage.....it’s the same for houses, why wouldn’t you pay for investment property to be checked? Some older wooden homes can deteriorate within the space of a few months....if you have a property manager checking it, they will see the maintenance that is needed way before the tenant does, saving the owner $1000’s.
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                • Angela Ballard 30 days ago
                  Marie2420, you have just made a great case for third party property inspections by experts. Property managers (often the entry level workers in the real estate sector) have no building or maintenance expertise.
              • Roxanne#1 29 days ago
                Dear Angela, I guess that all the Good Tenants and Good Owners wish that all the Bad Tenants and Bad Owners would leave the system. A Building and Pest inspection costs about $500+, added to the rent each year that would be at least $7 per week. I am sure that if you are willing to pay for this the Owner would oblige. An agent performs more than passing on maintenance requests. Cheers, Roxanne
          • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
            In this case a building inspection at the beginning of the tenancy would not have picked up any problems. The tenants had been renting that property for several years but admitted they had only noticed a problem with the stairs about three months before my inspection but for some reason had not reported it to the previous agent. All agents must complete an entry condition report at the beginning of each tenancy. As you would be aware this and the exit condition reports are mandated by the RTA. I always allow plenty of time to complete this report. Looking at all aspects of the property however I am not a builder or plumber etc. so if I find a problem I always let the owner know and get authorisation for a tradesperson to take a look. I take dated photographs and a video of the property while it is vacant this includes the inside of cupboards, under stairs etc. and share these with the new tenants through a cloud service. At the end of the lease both the tenants and I have these pictures and video to refer to as well as the written report. As I said in a previous post as long as the tenancy is going well I feel that after the first inspection at three months then six months or longer between inspections is fine. However if the owner states three monthly inspections on their form six then I have no choice but to do three monthly inspections even if I believe they are not necessary. The only thing I can do is make the inspections as unintrusive at possible for the tenant but in truth I have never had a tenant complain about the frequency or otherwise of inspections.
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            • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
              What were all the other agents doing during their inspections of that property before you came along? The tenants had been there for years. Again, an argument that suggests that tenants were the problem does not stand up in this case...the poorly done, previous inspections were more likely the problem.
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              • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
                Unfortunately Angela your argument does not stand up in this case although I admit probably due to my not giving enough history of this situation. The previous agent/manager had done an inspection six months before me. That inspection was thorough but did not mention any problems with the stairs because at that time on the tenants' admission there were not any they only noticed the problem a couple of months later. When I asked why they had not reported this they just said they waited until inspections to report any problems. I am sure you would agree that no matter how thorough an inspection is problems can suddenly arise in between inspections in rental properties just as they can arise suddenly in owner occupied properties. The strange thing in this situation is that this property is in the complex I manage, my office is a few metres from the tenants front door and I spoke to them even if only to say hello a couple of times a week but for some reason they still did not mention a problem with the stairs. This is not an isolated case I have found other less serious problems at inspections and when asked why they were not reported the tenants' answer has always been the same 'We always wait until the inspection.' Does your research indicate why tenants will not report problems between inspections?
        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          One has to wonder why these tenants were reluctant to report maintenance issues. Perhaps in the past there had been bad relations and fear of being given a 60 day notice to vacate if they complained too much. Don't be so quick to judge the tenant without finding out the why. Most people who rent are responsible people. Who would deliberately put themselves in danger when there is a clear health and safety issue?
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          • Emmadeanne about 2 months ago
            Yes Unhappy renter I do wonder why anyone would put themselves in danger but I certainly do not judge tenants. These tenants were just into the seventh month of a twelve month fixed term lease so they could certainly could not have been given two months' notice to leave. They did leave at the end of that lease for employment reasons not because the owner instructed me to give them a notice to leave. Unfortunately I have come across several problems that should have been attended to much sooner but the tenants wait until an inspection to report the problem and I am not some anonymous property manager I live in the complex I manage so actual speak to most tenants at least once a week, only in passing I do not go around knocking at doors, so this puzzles me completely. A number of the problems I have found, cooking appliances not working etc. are actually emergency repairs under the act and I cannot imagine trying to live on takeaways and salad for months on end because the stove did not work. I admit that a minority of my owners do not like to spend money on what they consider to be minor repairs (mesh in fly screens and the like) but can usually be persuaded if they think they might lose a good tenant. I have asked tenants why they did not report a problem but the reply is always the same 'I knew an inspection was due (sometimes months away) so I waited.' I certainly would not have waited. I am like any property manager my contract is with the owner and I am constrained by the instructions that owner has given me in their form 6. I feel that if tenancy laws are changed the Office of Fair Trading will have to change its forms to reflect the changes to this legislation.
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            • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
              I find it difficult to understand why people would want to live with a dangerous issue such as the stairs you mentioned. I wonder what would cause the stairs to deteriorate in such a way? Were white ants a problem? You said that the tenants had been there for years, were they always so reluctant to report maintenance issues? I put it to you that the majority of tenants don't behave in this way, we are people just ordinary people who mostly just want to live quietly in a home that is well maintained like any body else. I can't know why these tenants acted the way they did but all the tenants I know (and that's quite a few) would much prefer to have things fixed promptly without fuss so they can go on living in peace. Unfortunately not many of us hav had the luxury of maintenance being carried out promptly if at all.
      • Tammy N 2 months ago
        That is assuming they do something about it when you report it. When it is ignored after reporting and continued to be ignored for a further 3 inspections it makes you wonder what they are bothering with the inspections for in the first place.
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        • Allyoz 2 months ago
          Quite agree. Agent asked were there any maintenance items during the last inspection so naturally, I responded, genuinely, "Other than the items found at the last two inspections that are yet to be addressed?" The favoured response I receive these days is "I've passed it onto the landlords and there's nothing I can do if they don't want to proceed." Am I wrong in assuming this is a common tactic? There does seem to be a barrage of strategies to have tenants agree and comply with even the most bizarre and outrageous claims. The latest for us is the LL no longer wants to pass on the solar credits as they wish to recoup the original installation costs, according to the agent. Sending a fabricated invoice, stating it is the original electricity companies invoice, without even trying to get the fonts the same.
        • Fc35 about 2 months ago
          Unfortunately if the owner refuses to address maintenance the agent cannot just go ahead and organise it, and the agent is still obliged to conduct maintenance inspections regardless due to their contractual agreement with the owner to do so. Send the owner a notice to remedy breach if maintenance is not done.
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          • Tammy N about 2 months ago
            It does not help when you get no feedback from the real estate. Left to question repeatedly when if anything is to be done. They could at least let you know the owner does not want to do anything and will not authorise repairs. They should then make sure the tenant is not held responsible for continued deterioration due to the repair not being fixed initially.
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            • Fc35 about 2 months ago
              I agree, tenants should be advised what’s going on, even if that is simply that the owner has been informed.
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      Behaving?
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      • Cathe_78 2 months ago
        Yes. I've noticed quite a few real estate agents and property owners on this forum making comments that indicate that they believe they have the right to pass moral judgement on those of us who rent. Take a look at the pet forum to see many examples.
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        • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
          Thanks for the clarification. Yes, so many of my 230+ rental research respondents indicated that the attitudes and behaviours of property owners/management challenge the renters' security (as defined by the renters). Agents are the biggest worry, in part because they manage 88% of properties.
    • Fc35 about 2 months ago
      How the tenant is behaving??? it's not about tenant behaviour, its about inspecting the property for maintenance & to check that the tenant is meeting their obligations.It's not about 'tenant behaviour'
  • AMGrigg about 1 month ago
    The current period of notice works well. The frequency of inspections by property managers is appropriate to monitor the property's condition. The annual owners inspection is also adequate.
  • PM GC about 1 month ago
    I'd like to see a window for inspection notice. We just received notice more than a month out from our inspection - it's too long. I'd like to see a 1 week minimum and 2 week maximum.
  • Ann Davis about 1 month ago
    We have a number of rental properties and we keep all of them in good repair. We also live close by and recently one reported on a Friday afternoon that there was a water leak in the bathroom. It was after hours when I received the email so imagining the worst, my husband went to the property (we are known to the tenants) and asked if he could repair the problem which turned out to be a rusted out flexible pipe under the wash hand basin. This repair took about half an hour. The tenant complained that we were breaching her privacy but she didn't refuse entry, which she could have done so if she wanted to. To stem the water flow she had towels in the cupboard but the waterleak had been enough to stain carpets in the next room and caused damage to the cupboard. The tenant sent an abusive email to the agent and was generally very unpleasant over the matter. Surely, a tenant has a responsibility to balance the wellbeing of the property as well as their privacy.
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    • PM GC about 1 month ago
      If emergency repairs were required and you accessed the property, it's not a breach. If you went in and said they needed to clean the shower screen or that the place was not up to scratch, that would be overstepping the mark. If you took photos other than the broken pipe, it would be a breach. You have a responsibility to mitigate damage to the property especially if you are claiming the damage to carpets and cupboards on your insurance.
  • Property Landlord about 1 month ago
    As we live around 14 hours away from our rental property, it is sometimes hard to give 7 days notice we would like to have a look at it. Not to do an inspection but just meet the tenants to see if they have any concerns. This happened recently and they did so we were able to help them as we have had 4 managers in 3 years and the info hasn't been passed onto the next one.
  • GJan about 1 month ago
    If you have your property in the hands of a property manager you should not have any problems.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Cathe_78 about 1 month ago
      Maybe in a parallel universe...
  • DAH about 1 month ago
    Entry to rental property should be agreed to by the tenant and should be either regular inspections as stated in contract and reason/cause provided if entry is outside of that. The real estate should provide reasonable times (not just during the day) so tenants have an opportunity to be there
  • John Connor about 1 month ago
    Regarding reasonable periods for Notice of Entry: An entry notice that I have issue with is the one that occurs for a property valuation. Only 24 hours notice is given for what can potentially be a thorough inspection, including photographs. To my mind, that's an unfair intrusion on a tenant, and it doesn't serve the owner well if a valuation occurs when the tenant and the property is unprepared. For requested maintenance, a 1-2 day notice period is fine, but in all other instances, tenants ought to be given at least a few days notice, if not a week.
  • Karen G2 about 1 month ago
    There are perfectly adequate Entry Notice forms and periods in QLD. Really the only time this does not work is when Agents or owners disregard the tenants right to privacy. Tenants also need to be reasonable and allow entry for maintenance - especially when it is urgent or they have requested it.
  • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
    Here's a radical idea. Get tenants to do the maintenance reports quarterly. Give them a checklist, and ask them to contact management if stuff needs doing. And then see what actually gets followed up on and repaired. So many opinions in this thread point to the need for annual, certified maintenance checks for minimum standards. That should be enough to assuage the 'maintenance' argument. Then it becomes about tenancy, not property management, and that's another story. There's as much need to manage owners and agents behaviours as tenants.
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    • Pam4 2 months ago
      Some tenants would be great at this. Others couldn't be bothered. The owner is responsible for maintenance so from a liability point of view I don't think it would be acceptable to pass that responsibility on to the tenant.
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      • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
        unfortunately Pam there's no liability in practice because who can afford to take a negligent owner to court. Yes owners are supposed to be responsible for all sorts of things but often do not follow through. What often happens is that tenants get given notice to leave if they have requested repairs - even emergency ones. So the tenants are the ones in need of more protection here. Breaching owners ends up the same way. there's significant power imbalances in the system
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        • foxje about 2 months ago
          Pretty sure a coroner can afford to take a negligent landlord to court. The liability is real.
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          • Talon about 2 months ago
            Interesting that you think the only time a tenant deserves the property they rent to be fixed, is when they die because of it.
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            • foxje about 2 months ago
              Cmon Talon, that is silly and not helpful to this discussion. Let’s be adults.
            • foxje about 2 months ago
              Removed by moderator.
    • homelesswithpets 2 months ago
      I don’t think the agents would agree to this based on the fact that when they conduct inspections that is one of their services as property manager that they bill the owner for. Less inspections = less money for them. At least that is what I have been told by owners and agents before.
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      • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
        Very likely. Inspections justify agents existence. if they look busy busy busy every 3 months then they must be doing a good job. Unfortunately that frequency level of inspections buys into nonsense attitudes about tenants being second class, trashing the joint, being untrustworthy etc etc. They don't have to inspect so regularly, but the culture and practice in Queensland became turbocharged with changes made by the Newman government which strengthened contractual obligations on agents. That legislation is no longer but the marketing practice and imposition on renters remains.
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        • T17 2 months ago
          Angela, I am a property manager and routine inspections are needed for both the tenant and the owner. Some owners rely on their agent viewing the property on their behalf if they have not been able to view their property for some time (overseas/interstate owners). Owners rely on agents to see what maintenance may be required or what improvements could be made. Tenants do report maintenance but sometimes they do not notice everything. Often tenants do not report overgrown trees even though it can cause blockages leading to huge structural issues. It also ensures that tenants are keeping on top of their responsibilities. Most of the time tenants really look after the properties but there are times when checks are needed. Inspections also give a chance for tenants to mention something that may be going on that they don't always feel is important but can turn into a bigger problem. Inspections really shouldn't be a hassle for anyone involved if everyone is doing the right thin.
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          • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
            T17 Routine inspections are not the issue, its the frequency of three monthly and the lack of proper care to investigate and fix actual maintenance issues. As per an earlier comment there is no reason why property maintenance inspections should not be undertaken in between tenancies, when the place is momentarily vacated. All the things you mention are slow moving issues so again, not necessary for quarterly inspections if the building inspections are done properly. Tenants are not necessarily at home when inspections occur and besides, an email or phone call can suffice. The point I am trying to make is that the system is geared to agents and owners outcomes, not renters needs for a sense of home without interference. The problem, writ large in my research data, is the impact on privacy - having people wander through your personal space and belongings, taking photos ( a common practice with phones these days). 79% of respondents indicated very strongly that inspections are the greatest impost on privacy. So, its not for agents to declare its not a problem.
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            • foxje about 2 months ago
              I believe she said it shouldn’t be a problem if everyone is doing the right thing, I’m not sure that specific question was tested in your PhD? Also, to be frank, a study of 233 renters in a population of 500,000+ barely qualifies as an exploratory analysis; certainly not the level of investigation necessary to support any evidence-based policy positions. I suggest your comment that the ‘system’ is geared towards owners and agents is an outcome of private property rights, and to ‘gear’ it in any other direction is an encorachmwnt on those private property rights which underpin our society. I do not disagree on some of your points that less frequent entries may be beneficial to tenants. However to disregard the impact on owners or agents is immature.
          • Van 2 months ago
            I don't understand how quarterly routine inspections are "for the tenant". I don't need the agent to come around to my house every three months for me to report maintenance problems. I tell them by email when I notice anything that needs repair. My current agent scheduled the first routine inspection only six weeks after I moved in. I questioned it and was told, "Oh, it's for you just as much as it is for us." No, it wasn't for me; it was a bloody nuisance. I hadn't even found all my furniture and settled in before they came barging through the front door. I wonder if it would help for agents/property owners to supply information on what tenants should be looking out for, as many people would have no idea - as long as it's seen as a "for your information" document and not a transfer of legal responsibility for the maintenance from the owner to the tenant.
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            • Van 2 months ago
              I think that last point is a bit confusing without paragraphs. When I said "I wonder if it would help for agents/property owners to supply on information on what tenants should be looking out for", I meant information about things that need maintenance or attention.
            • bartj about 2 months ago
              This is becoming the new norm Van, inspection 6weeks after moving in, I haven't checked on the legality of it, but I've heard this happening interstate aswell. I suspect that it's either not allowable under the act (perhaps it's something that is allowable in other states that agents assumed they can do her aswell), or else, it's just a scam.
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              • Van about 2 months ago
                If I remember correctly I looked in the Act when it happened and it didn't specify whether it was legal or not. It shouldn't be.
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                • bartj about 2 months ago
                  Agreed. However since the act only really specifies that visits can't be less than 3 months since the last entry, I guess that allows for an inspection earlier than 3 months. In the case I heard, they did the 6 week inspection and then still did the 3 month inspection from the date the lease started, instead of 3 months after the 6 week inspection - that's probably the area tenants should be challenging agents. Personally I don't understand the point of a 6 week inspection - like someone else mentioned, most people are still settling in at that point, what does a 6 week inspection achieve?
          • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
            If what you say was true then all the maintenance issues reported would be fixed. There has been overhanging branches blocking guttering in our units for months and reported regularly but nothing has ever been done. I agree with homeless with pets the property managers go through the motions taking photos, opening cupboards etc, so it looks like they are busy and doing their job but noting ever gets fixed unless it is something they legally have to fix. Such as a water problem.
      • FSL2018 2 months ago
        Most agreement are a % of rent. So if the tenant is paying the rent, the owner and the property manager don't get paid.
    • bartj about 2 months ago
      This is actually completely realistic Angela, the last inspection I had, a couple of years ago - the agent was using an ipad app, to take photos and upload them directly to a database, which is then available for the owner to see. To be honest, I wonder why, in this day and age, people still bother with an agent at all.
    • Graham18 about 1 month ago
      I disagree. A tenant can already contact a Property manager about any identified issue, but some simply don't notice or don't care. Personally as a landlord when I pay a property manager I expect them to manage the property. That includes making sure that any maintenance issues are identified and resolved. I don't pay the tenant to check the property I pay the property manager to do that, The tenant pays, me to live there. This way is simpler because the lines are clear.
  • Challenged 2 months ago
    I understand the need to inspect a property but having someone open cupboards and pry through personal belongings in unacceptable!
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    • Lillian 2 months ago
      No need for that just ovens, dishwasher, rangehoods
    • irtapil 2 months ago
      i don't think they're allowed to do that currently?
    • GeeGee 2 months ago
      Who does that!!??
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      • Van 2 months ago
        I know of an agent who opens cupboards to "check for leaks", takes photos regardless of whether there is a leak or not, then sends the photos to the landlord. That should not be allowed by law.
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        • JaniceAC 2 months ago
          The cupboard under a kitchen sink or a vanity should be inspected for leaks by the property manager.
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          • Van about 2 months ago
            If that is going to happen it has to be made very clear to the tenant, because people keep some very personal items in cupboards, particularly in the vanity. People looking in my vanity would get more information about my medical history than I'd want them to have and certainly more than they would want to know.In the case I described, the problem was also that the agent was taking photos and sending them to the landlord. I consider that to be an egregious breach of privacy. Surely it's enough for the agent to report the results in writing?
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            • Talon about 2 months ago
              The RTA told me the tenant could refuse on grounds on quiet enjoyment. I recently had this change for inspections with my REA and hence sought out whether I had to accept it as I was concerned for my privacy. Luckily the lovely REA who came didn't end up even asking. If they ever do I will be refusing. I report maintenance so there is no need for snooping or REAs being privy to information about my health conditions.
            • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
              I think you have to accept that if someone comes into the property when you’re not there armed with a camera/video telling them beforehand that they can’t look here or can’t take photos there is a total waste of time. That’s why I never leave papers out on the desk that I wouldn’t want someone to see etc etc not just at inspection times but always. Similar with other things I don’t want them to see. I’ve just got into the habit of putting stuff securely away. It’s not the way we should have to live. You have absolutely no way of knowing what they look at unless you install covert cameras yourselves. The only way to stop this is to legislate against owners and REAs being allowed to enter the property without the tenant being there for anything other than an emergency. An alternative to that is to reduce the number of routine inspections which at least gives the tenant longer periods between them coming in.
          • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
            I would imagine if there was a leak under the kitchen sink or vanity the tenant would know about it and would have already reported it. Who wants to live with a leaky cupboard? Especially when it would be damaging personal property as well as the cupboard. Your reasoning for prying into people's cupboards is not sound and is another attempt by property mangers to demean already vulnerable tenants by intruding on their privacy.
          • Van about 2 months ago
            Actually, the more I think about this, the more I think that an agent/owner should have to ask the tenant's permission to be able to look in cupboards, and set out exactly what they intend to do. (Which cupboards will be checked? Will the inspector just look and report to the landlord in writing/verbally? Will they touch any possessions inside? Will they take photos? Will they 100% avoid including the tenant's possessions in the photos?) Agents should expect to negotiate - your tenant might be okay with you checking visually but might not want you to take photos or touch possessions. Checking cupboards should not be covered by a clause inserted into a rental contract, as then people feel they have no choice but to sign and accept it if they want a roof over their heads, regardless of how uncomfortable they are with it. The tenant should legally be able to say no and if they do supply written permission, should be able to revoke access to cupboards whenever they like.
          • Wendy P about 2 months ago
            I am a property manager, I attended a property, opened the cupboard under the vanity and it was full of water, the tenants said they hadn't noticed, and therefore the cupboard is ruined as it is now swollen and it was only 3 months old. A lot can happen in 3 months, and if the tenants do not report leaks or other repairs required, it costs a lot more to repair.
        • Fc35 about 2 months ago
          Would that be under the kitchen sink & bathroom vanity? I would expect a property manager to simply ask the tenant "do you mind if I have a look under the sink", I really don't see a problem with this.
    • Graham18 about 1 month ago
      If you mean clothing cupboards or drawers or furniture that belongs to the tenant or the tenant's personal belongings than I would say I totally agree with you. If you mean a cupboard under a sink to make sure that no water is getting away from say a leaky S-bend, or a cupboard where a hot water system sits again to check that it's not leaking, then I disagree. I mean as a Landlord I don't think Inspections are just about checking a tenant is not damaging the property but they are also about making sure the property is in a good state of repair. If my property manager didn't pick something like a leaking pipe up early it could cost me significantly more money in the long run.
  • WBJM about 1 month ago
    As a home owner I am shocked at the claims I read that walls (and ceilings?) should be repainted every 5-8 years, that carpets should be replaced 5 yearly, kitchens 10 to 15 yearly, curtains 5 yearly etc. I could not possibly afford that rate of replacement in my own home, even if I wanted it. I ensure such major repair and maintence s not needed by being careful to prevent damage and thorough about cleaning and minor maintenance. Rent earned on a home would not pay for that rate of replacement after rates, insurance, routine repairs and maintenance, management costs, etc. it speaks very ill of the average renter if that is the sort of damage the homes they rent are suffering. I am also shocked at the descriptions of the condition of some rental properties. At a change of long term tenants I go into the home, usually camp in it while I clean the house thoroughly and do gardens. If necessary floor coverings and curtains are replaced and paintwork is tidied up, repainted if necessary. I try to re-rent a property in sale, or close to sale condition and expect that tenants will want to maintain it like that. Some do, some do not. I know a number of other investors like myself; some will rent out a home inherited from parents or the home they plan to retire to or will be paying off a small number of homes to secure a superannuation. Many have sold those homes in frustration and disappointment because tenants have been so disrepectful of their property and the costs have been excessive. Tenants should have a comfortable pleasant home which they enjoy and respect and make every effort to keep in that condition. Owners should ensure the property is well maintained. Agents have an important role, importantly for many tenants maintaining an arms length relationship between them and the owner.As an owner I want three monthly inspections to ensure the condition of my house and the comfort of the tenant's home. A lot can go wrong in three months even when a tenant has been a good reliable tenant of long standing.
  • Manuela Busack about 1 month ago
    How about selling a rental property? What’s your thoughts on this? I would like to think families renting should have the option of leaving a rental instead of going through an open house situation for however long it takes to sell the property. I pay to rent the home and feel that at least selling shouldn’t be part of the renters situation. Wait until the tenant has left the rental (relocating) and then have your open house.
  • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
    My research asked about privacy and inspections were by far the greatest impact on privacy...79% of over 220 respondents indicated this strongly. There's no evidence whatsoever for the ground level practice of 3monthly inspections in Queensland. That practice is based in marketing to property owners and severely impacts on Renters sense of home. Nothing tells them that they as renters are second class than these inspections. A better approach is to establish a tenancy and ensure that the property itself is up to minimum standards at the three month mark which is also sufficient time to assess tenants payments etc. Once all is well established sliding scale of inspections 6-12monthly is more than sufficient in vast majority of tenancies. Inspecting tenants quarterly, and not actually ensuring minimum standards and repairs is a dreadful impost on those paying for a home they never get to settle into because of regular and for sale inspections. Agents don't consider tenants their customers....and that's part of the problem. Much better training and practice change required. As a wit recently said baristas receive far more training than the 1day to become a property manager!
    Hide Replies (20)
    • FSL2018 2 months ago
      Tenants aren't the agent's customer. They do not pay the agent's commission. Tenant's are the consumer in this scenario. Unfortunately, the few bad apples have spoiled it for the majority of tenants. Agent's can not ascertain if a tenant is good or bad, they can only recommend on previous behaviour. (Rent kept up to date, good tenant ledger etc). They also can't tell if a previously 'good' tenant is going to turn 'bad' (for reasons within or beyond the tenant's control), hence why the quarterly inspections. At the most it should be 6 monthly, but no longer. The key I think to this relationship is communication. If a tenant keeps in regular contact with their agent, things can get sorted out much quicker. The greasy wheel ....
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      • EarlGrey 2 months ago
        FSL2018,You have defiantly got that wrong, without the rent payment from the customer (tenant) commission cannot be paid. A remark like "A few bad apples have spoiled it for the majority of tenants " is the typical closed minds that seem to persist amongst agents with rent rolls. When renting houses I have had to change agents many time because of a lack of professional experience combined with social ineptness. Agents are the one's who should be keeping in touch on a regular basis. if you throw bricks you have to expect bricks back, but if you throw roses you come out smelling roses. If you expect the best you may very often get the best back.
      • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
        there's a big difference between sharing an opinion and research data and analysis based in hundreds of rental experiences. by the same token renters cannot know if an agent or owner is good or bad. As I stated there is no research or evidence whatsoever to back up the claim that quarterly inspections are necessary. Quite the contrary. What all parties in this system do not acknowledge is that if renters are not permitted to make a rental place into their home they may not be invested sufficiently (in time love or money) to care about the property as per the expectation that they treat it like home. Respect for renters needs to make a place home (which means longer flexible tenancies, allowance for minor, non structural, changes, pets etc) is repaid in kind. research data again shows that tenants often contact for necessary repairs and get no response whatsoever yet put up with nonsense inspections so the agents can tick a box. The best rental outcomes appear to come when people have been in a city long enough to move out of formal, agent managed places into direct relationship with owners happy to have good tenants stay as long as they like and where tenants are happy to take care...because they too know they are being looked after.
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        • FSL2018 2 months ago
          I agree that a landlord/agent who does not repair or respond is despicable. However, allowing tenants minor, non-structural changes is fine as long as the tenant is willing to pay to have the property returned to the original state as per the entry condition report. For example, a tenant at present should ask if they can put up picture hooks. Seems ridiculous however, imagine the property being rented to 4 different tenants over a 16 year period. Each tenant is allowed to put up picture hooks where-ever they choose to suit their framed photographs. Each tenant will have different types and sizes of frames and so will required the hooks to be in different places. The landlord at the end of the period is left with walls full of holes that needs to be repaired. Which tenant is required to pay for this? Or is it now the landlords responsibility to fix the wall? Another example, pets. Under the proposed changes, a tenant is allowed to keep pets without landlord approval and gets a dog. The dog wees on the carpet many times during the tenancy and the tenant cleans the carpet as best they can during their tenancy. They get the carpet dry-cleaned at the end of the tenancy and all is hunky-dory when they move out. Unfortunately, the next tenant starts complaining of a foul smell coming from the carpet and it is found that the wee has penetrated the underlay which now can't be cleaned. Is it now the landlord's responsibility to replace the carpet? Or should they go through QCAT and have to pay the fees associated with this, to get the previous tenant to pay for it? The tenant's right to live in a property does not outway the landlords right to maintain the property as they see fit, meeting all legal requirements (e.g. hot running water etc). No tenant should have to live in a substandard dwelling.
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          • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
            The better solution here is for owners concerned about this to install a hanging system that various tenants can buy the hanging parts for...and put things up where they like. I have never known owners to repair tiny picture holes in walls in 35 years of renting. Guidance about the type of wall and hooks required would help...tho my current landlord gave wrong info on that. I simply used the existing holes.there are points here about balance. the point of balance my research group came up with re tenant changes to property (to make the place home) was.....all non structural changes allowed subject to a return to the condition of property upon leasing. (I would now add subject to negotiation at end of tenancy) This means....sure paint a wall purple and have a dog but if the wall was white to begin with then that's what it should go back to. Wear and tear is expected...and yes, animals and humans get sick, pee on carpets and old fittings and materials (lino, laminate, old plastic light shades,) break down. the number of times I have lived with 85 year old lino - multiples patterns in one room! and disintegrating carpet - causing health problems for me -simply because the owners wanted to protect the floorboards from people renting the place still appalls me.As for the rest of it....thanks what entry and exit reports are for and bond. Kids make just as much or more mess than animals...but there's no rule about them.
          • Lildei 2 months ago
            The property would have been professionally painted twice in that 16 year period if it were properly maintained, so those holes would be repaired at that stage. Any professional painter will tell you that interior walls need to be painted at least every 5 to 8 years, unfortunately not many owners are prepared maintain their properties to that standard
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            • FSL2018 2 months ago
              Lildei, I'm not sure how you work out that the property would have been painted professionally every 5-8 years. That may be what professional painters say however painting is only required when there is extensive damage to the paint or the wall, otherwise there is no requirement to paint the walls. Maybe these expectations of a landlord are unrealistic, especially if there is no need for the walls to be painted. Many homeowners do not paint their interiors every 8 years, so why should a landlord be expected too. In a rental, if a wall is required to be painted, it will only be the damaged wall not every room. Also, the underlying assumption that renters are entitled to have their property painted every 8 years is unrealistic. The myth that landlords are fat cats and can afford everything is perpetuated to the detriment of all involved. Especially when the majority of landlords are mum and dad investors. (For clarity, they bought the property as part of their retirement plan). Rent usually only covers the cost of the mortgage, so when there is an issue, the money has to come from their wage. Usually, good owners will have a rainy day savings account to cover emergency repairs - toilets/roof leaks etc. Most landlords, like most tenants, don't have the ability to hold $10,000 just in case the property needs to be repainted. So although in the perfect world the property would have been painted twice, the reality is that the painting would probably not have happened. Angela, kids do make a mess but they usually don't pee on the carpet and scratch doors. They also usually learn from their mistakes, granted some quicker than others. Also, why should a landlord that has a particular style of home have to change that style and install a hanging system for one tenant when another may want a different height etc? I appreciate that pets and minor changes can help make a property a home, however, both sides needs, have to be balanced. If a landlord is prepared to allow pets, then that's great, if not, the tenant needs to find a property that does allow pets or alternatively, find a pet that is suitable to the landlord.
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              • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
                the hanging system I am referring to has lines with clips that hang from a cornice level track. I suggested the owner put in to track and the renters pay for and keep the lines/clips to hang at the level they want and then take it with them to the next place. The cost is shared equally and everybody is happy...unless there happens to be an owner who can't bear the thought of the renters (paying off his/her investment) making a rental property into their home and living a normal life. the category of investor is not the issue here. Investors need to fully understand the costs, and insure for risk like a business or buy shares instead.
              • Lildei 2 months ago
                I didn’t say it was a requirement to repaint but if tenants are expected to look after a property so should the owner, my brother was a painter, you should repaint at least every 8 years to keep the walls in a reasonable condition, after 16 years the walls are going to be looking pretty shabby anyway, if tenants are expected to look after the property the landlord should be required to do the same. I have lived in properties that haven’t been painted for over 20 years,it would be a bit unreasonable for the landlord to complain about the condition of the walls when tenants move out if they haven’t been painted for that long. As to mum and dad investors, they must realise that there is a need to maintain a property as well as doing emergency repairs, after all property investment is a long term investment, without routine maintenance the property will deteriorate no matter how good the tenants are. If they can’t afford to maintain a property to a reasonable standard they should consider investing elsewhere
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                • FSL2018 2 months ago
                  Again Lildei why should a landlord have to repaint every 8 years if it is not needed. Also, should a tenant be treated differently to a home owner. If a home owner does not repaint their walls every 8 years why should a landlord be expected to do it? Also, why should the landlord have to repaint the walls to fix the holes that are made by the tenant in the first place.I am not suggesting that the walls never get painted or they are left to get into a dilapidated state. What I am pointing out is that tenants have an unrealistic expectation of what a landlord should and shouldn't be required to do.Most mum and dad investors do realise what they are getting into. When they get a good tenant, they will go out of their way to keep them, as it is much easier to paint the wall than to have new tenants move in.My point in all of this is why should the landlord be financially responsible for tenant choices? pets/picture hooks etc. Why should they not have a say in how their property is treated?
                  Hide Replies (2)
                  • Lildei 2 months ago
                    I agree, the landlord shouldn’t be out of pocket because of a tenants choices, no argument there. If a tenant puts picture hooks in and the landlord wants them removed at the end of the tenancy any damage should be repaired.
                  • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
                    It seems to me owners and agents have all the say, it's tenants who have no say. They are expected to maintain the property and keep it to a good standard yet owners don't seem to have any responsibility in ensuring those properties are kept to a good standard. My walls virtually have no paint left on them, I'm down to the plasterboard and of course they look tatty. No amount of scrubbing or cleaning can make them look any better. The bare minimum that is required legally is performed and nothing else. I have spent money here trying to fix things to make it a pleasant place to live, is that acknowledged? Will I ever see my money again when I move out? Does the owner benefit from the improvements I have made to his property? FSL2018 think carefully about what you are saying.
              • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
                What about when you inherit an animal that's been abandoned b the previous tenant and the agent has not ensured the animal has been removed before the new tenant moves in? That is my case, and now the agent is trying to force me to take responsibility for the animal that was left here! My property owner has many properties and none of them are in good repair, when they get so run down it is going to cost a fortune to fix he simply sells the property on and buys another what about those tenants? I have spent a considerable sum of my own money trying to make this property into a home, replacing broken and badly damaged fixtures as well trying to keep a well maintained garden that was not there when I moved in. The agent who inspected my home last week complained I needed to weed my garden even though there wasn't a garden there when I moved in!
          • Sanch about 2 months ago
            This is a bit absurd. A bit of filler and a splash of paint , and picture holes are filled and covered.I have 2 dogs. They don't wee inside, why would I expect that a 'Tenant's ' dog would ?
        • foxje about 2 months ago
          Hi Angela can you link to your research please?
      • Jennyec about 1 month ago
        A customer is a person who buys goods or services. In this case the tenant is both a customer and a consumer.
    • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
      Angela it took me far more than one day to become a real estate agent and for my licence to become an onsite manager (resident letting agent) I agree with some of what you say. Certainly agents need to do an inspection at the three or four month mark to assess the general progress of the tenancy after that every six months or in an ideal world one year would be ok in many cases. However many tenants for reasons known only to themselves do not report even quite major problems if they occur between inspections. In one case I know of the tenants did not report that a leak in the upstairs bathroom was damaging the ceiling plaster in the lounge for five months. The damage cost the owners much more to repair than if the problem had been promptly reported. When new tenants arrive to pick up their keys I always stress that they should report maintenance issues promptly but it does not always happen. Another thing that needs to be considered is that an property manager's contract is with the owner not with the tenant. If the owner insists on inspections every three months and I do not do this I am in breach of my contract with him or her. That said I find after the first six months if the tenancy is going well most owners are happy for inspections to take place every six months. Maybe there needs to be something in the legislation to ensure that tenants do report problems within a reasonable time and also that owners also have an obligation to ensure maintenance is completed in a reasonable time. Often agents are blamed for lack of maintenance but I am not allowed to spend more on an owner's behalf than is listed in his or her form six no matter how much I might agree with the tenant.
    • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
      Angela you have a lot to say on this subject and refer to research you have done. Could you please let me know where I can view a copy of this research and in what capacity you conducted it. Sorry if you have given this information in another post but I have not seen it.
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      • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
        PhD UQ 2018. typing in 'Loose Praxis' into Google will find it at UQ e-space. (apologies...I typed this the other day but it doesn't seem to have been sent. only just noticed)
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        • Emmadeanne about 1 month ago
          Angela that was quite a read I must admit I thought your sample was little on the small side but it seems you had greater ambitions that were thwarted. The joys of research! I think you would agree that there will be a bit of bias in this type of research and had a similar number of owners or property managers been approached the outcome would have been different. That said the attitude of the owner where the tenants had a blocked toilet was just despicable. This is an emergency repair under the act the tenants had every right to have it fixed. What did the owner expect the tenants to do? Hold on all weekend. Except for one recent post on another discussion I have decided not to make anymore as I feel most discussions are becoming a bit 'them and us so I will write a submission instead but reading through the posts from tenants, owners and agents one thing has become obvious; there is a lot of ignorance out there with regard to everyone's rights and responsibilities. I feel the answer to this is better education for all parties. When new tenants sign a lease I ask them to make time when they pick up the keys to discuss all aspects of the lease etc. especially if they are young first time renters. When new owners ask me to manage their properties the same happens. Most are ok but I have refused to manage the properties of two owners due to their attitude to tenants and maintenance. I attend seminars and workshops to I am up to date with legislation and believe all property managers should do the same. By now you have probably guessed my previous profession. I feel that instead of 'them and us' we should all be working together to make the legislation fair and equitable for everyone. On a lighter note I liked your cartoons of property managers and owners but most seemed to be represented as unreasonable so this is me doing inspections: Emma, property manager, dressed in sensible low shoes (don't know where those young agents buy their shoes), t shirt and cargo pants worn almost indecently low not for fashion but because the pockets are full of 'stuff' I might need. Phone, mobile broadband, small tool kit for on the spot minor repairs, keys, note book and pen to leave a note for the tenants usually positive but sometimes to give a gentle nudge in the right direction, small treat for number six's Chihuahua, larger treat for twenty's spaniel, cat treat to hopefully prevent thirty's ginger tom leaping up and biting my posterior and tissues you just never know when you might need to wipe your hands. I hope your research showed that not all property managers are unreasonable. One thing many tenants do not take into account is that our contract is with the owner so even if we agree with a tenant, for example, on a matter of maintenance we cannot have anything done without the owner's consent. Hopefully there will be a positive outcome for all parties when and if new legislation is written. PS I never give a treat to a tenant's pet without permission.
  • Jennyec about 1 month ago
    Photos of personal property should not be allowed as it is a huge invasion of privacy . For 10 years we has 3 month inspections even though our home was always immaculate. Surely based on history, there should be a reduction in the frequency of inspections. Plus on three occasions our home was left unlocked by person inspecting our home.There should be more flexibility so the tenant can be home at time of inspection as I am not comfortable with a stranger in my home. How well are these people screened? Often they are very young and we seemed to have a different person each time.
  • Manuela Busack 2 months ago
    Inspections are always on a date and time chosen by the real estate but sometimes tenants may need to change the date which real estates don’t accept. Having a stranger in your home when your not home shouldn’t happen. It makes families uncomfortable. It would be nice to have this addressed. On privacy there is none when your belongings are photographed every three months. This is over use and only damages/wear and tear/ or faults should get photographed. As for reasons for all entries - unless it’s an emergency all other entries should be at an appointment date and time that suits in with both parties with tenant present. As for inspections every 3 months! Well after several years in the same house and no issues these inspections should move to 6 monthly and then yearly. Show the good tenants they are appreciated.
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    • Gallison about 1 month ago
      Yes I would love my real estate to be a bit flexible with routine inspections as I want to be homeMy neighbour had has her door left unlocked 3 times now by real estate.Also taking of photos with my possessions in photo is a huge privacy issue for me as don’t know where the photos will end up.
  • Jac1 about 1 month ago
    RE/Property Owners, offer no flexibility with inspection times, expecting tenants to allow them to enter the home with no one present, violation of privacy, or miss work appointments to fit in with their schedule.A reasonable period would be twice yearly!A tenant should be entitled to Quiet Enjoyment right up to the end of lease, as they are still paying for the property. The property can go on the market after the tenant leaves, allowing new tenants to see a vacant properties condition. "Quiet Enjoyment. I have been both an owner/tenant
  • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
    Routine inspections every three months are intrusive for the tenant and not necessary. Victoria only allows inspections every 6 months and we don’t hear that longer times between inspections down there is detrimental to owners. That timeline is right. Having someone come into your home every 13 weeks to see how you’re living is insulting.I was in my last rental for 8 years and without fail every three months I had an inspection. This is not a recent phenomenon. When I queried it the PM they said they treat all tenants equally no matter how long they’ve been with them.Also, all fixed tenancies should revert to periodic as soon as the property is put up for sale allowing the tenant to move out early if they wish. Current tenancy law is too weighted in favour of the owner in this regard with any compensation for the disruption this causes to the tenant’s life being left to negotiation between the two parties.
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    • foxje about 2 months ago
      On the contrary, we constantly hear stories of irreversible damage due to agents missing inspections or a greater frequency than permissible. If 3 month inspections were unnecessary, how are there still consistently stories of damage being done to the homes? Maybe 3 month inspections for SOME people, however they are not excessive for ALL people. And unfortunately, the only people who can judge that are the owners or their agents!
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      • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
        Then why do longer intervals work in other States? People have massive mortgages often on their homes, ie the bank technically owns them, but the bank doesn’t come in periodically to check if damage is being done to what they basically own yet tenants are not trusted by owners and are subject, in a lot of cases, to what are essentially housekeeping checks. My PM would come in and ask if there were any maintenance issues to which I always replied ‘no’ then would spend the rest of the time snooping around. They are not maintenance inspections at all.
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        • foxje about 2 months ago
          I may be wrong but I think the only state with longer intervals is Victoria, and the jury is still out on whether or not that 'works'. From a quick search, QLD, WA, NT, SA and NSW are all 3 monthly. We certainly still have a lot of stories about tenants causing a lot of irreparable damage... see this forum for example. LIkewise any property investment blog online. Also, the bank doesn't 'technically own' the property, the owner does. The bank does put some restrictions on the title as a mortgage holder but they do not own the property. They have the right to ask any number of things - to have appropriate insurance, to not sell the property. If I don't like that, I have to go to a different bank.
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          • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
            Victoria has just undergone a review of their tenancy laws and didn’t change six-monthly routine inspections. If there were enough persuasive submissions from owners seeking more frequent inspections during the consultative process then they would have changed it so you can hardly claim that the jury is out on whether it is working or not. Clearly it is.I read a lot of forums on this subject too. Overwhelmingly, I read about claims against bonds at the end of a tenancy rather than owners finding massive damage during routine inspections. Usually if they do it goes hand in hand with the tenant not paying their rent and that’s how they find out.
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            • foxje about 2 months ago
              I'm sorry but QLD just had a law changed where 80% of submissions were against the law and they jammed it through anyway. If a government has a particular ideological bent, no amount of submissions will change it, so that isn't evidence that there didn't need to be changed. RE bonds at the end of a tenancy - agree that is the more prevalent concern... but why did the tenancy end? Perhaps because an inspection picked up on something of big concern that caused the landlord to end the tenancy!! Either way, the effect is preventative as well, ie rooms get cleaned etc when there is an inspection scheduled. I understand that inspections may not be comfortable, but why have 6 months? Why not 12 months? Why not never? The principle is, that the owner has the right to check that his property is being looked after by the people he has leased it to. Plus, if you are a good tenant, you have the right to negotiate longer inspection periods in the lease in any case, and from what you've said, good tenants with good referees are able to get properties without 'resorting' to private landlords. So negotiate it in yourself, don't force everyone into the same bucket and take away owners' right to check on their property when they feel it is required.
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              • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
                So you admit the purpose, in part, is to do a housekeeping check. Of course the owner has the right to check on their property but doing that every 13 weeks is excessive. Actually, I’d love to be able to see how frequently a property is leased. It’d say more about the owner than it would say about their tenants as you claim! You cannot negotiate ANYTHING in a lease that contravenes the Act. You can put in as many special conditions as you like, and even get the tenant’s agreement, but they aren’t enforceable. That works in the owner’s favour too of course. Say you’ll do six-monthly inspections but change your mind at any time to three-monthly and there’s nothing the tenant can do about it.
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                • foxje about 2 months ago
                  That's not quite right. You are correct in that a lease condition which contravenes the act is not enforceable. However, the act only provides limitations on most things. Ie, 3 months inspections is the MOST frequent inspections can be. A tenant is perfectly entitled to negotiate a 6 month or 12 months inspection regime - having 12 monthly inspection does not contravene the act, therefore it is fully enforceable and the owner is bound by that condition.
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                  • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
                    That’s incorrect. Give the RTA a call. If the owner changes their mind to what is nothing more than a verbal agreement between landlord and tenant and decides to undertake inspections three-monthly then they can.
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                    • foxje about 2 months ago
                      Yes if it’s a verbal agreement then it is not binding. But if it is a written condition in the lease it is 100% enforceable!!
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                      • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
                        I said verbal agreement because that’s what it amounts to. It’s not worth the paper it’s written on. Give the RTA a call like I said. I know I’m 100% correct on that and it’s pointless discussing this any further with you.
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                        • foxje about 2 months ago
                          I’m sorry that’s 100% wrong. A Written condition on a lease is binding. It’s called special condition.
                • Fc35 about 2 months ago
                  s188 of rtra act requires you to “keep the property and it’s inclusions clean” you may interpret this as a housekeeping inspection. An agents written contract with the owner states how many inspections are to be completed yearly, it’s not something a tenant can negotiate. If agent does not complete these inspections they are in breach of their contract with the owner.
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                  • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
                    I don’t interpret it as a housekeeping inspection at all but some owners and REAs do.
              • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
                tenants have no power to negotiate less frequent inspections and my research suggests agents are the bigger problem....likely, given they manage 88% of the system. Bond gouging remains prevalent - it seems to be part of the business model for unscrupulous agents and owners with no sensible, compliant definition re fair wear and tear. This is where materials need to be codified by materials experts....40 year old laminate will stain easily, as will 30 year old carpet.
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                • foxje about 2 months ago
                  From what I’m hearing, I agree that agents seem to be an issue. But to say tenants have no power to negotiate less frequent inspections is wrong. Of course they do. And if tenants have been perfect, why would an owner risk losing a great tenant for what would be apparent as useless inspections.
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                  • Talon about 2 months ago
                    Removed by moderator.
                • foxje about 2 months ago
                  No one of good sense wants tenants paying for anything they haven’t damaged - that is against justice. I’m not sure materials experts are the answer - to me, a good quality entry condition report is pretty good defence to a spurious bond claim. However I have never had a dispute with a tenant so I’m not sure how the RTA is with assessing the claims. If they need help then I agree, let’s get them help!
          • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
            QLD and SA have 3 monthly - elsewhere is 6.
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        • foxje about 2 months ago
          And indeed inspections are not just 'maintenance inspections', they are also 'housekeeping' checks. The standard rta lease requires that a tenant keep a house clean and tidy. There are some things (ie mould, vermon) that is caused largely by unclean or untidy living, so the inspections check for both.
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          • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
            The RTA specifically says routine inspections are not housekeeping checks.
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            • foxje about 2 months ago
              Hi Cleocattra, I'm sorry but the Act or Regulation say nothing of the sort. Refer S192 which states the lessor may enter "to inspect the premises", it does not restrict what "Inspect the premises" means. Even Form17a (pocketbook for tenants) states that inspections are "to ensure the property is well cared for" which to me extends to housekeeping (insofar as it affects the care of the property, obviously). Food left rotting in a corner = housekeeping but also = care of the property. Ie the two overlap a lot.
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              • foxje about 2 months ago
                But yes you are correct, the owner has no place in telling a tenant how to fold their clothes, as long as it does not impact on the condition of the property. Ie rotting food. Damp spots. Mould not being cleaned. However, the owner does have a place in ensuring the tenant upholds his/her responsibility under the lease agreement (refer Clause 26 of the standard lease agreement Form18a - "The tenant must keep the premises clean, having regard to their condition at the start of the tenancy". Therefore cleanliness (housekeeping) is very much a consideration for a landlord and that is what an inspection is there to check on as much as maintenance or anything else.
              • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
                Take a read https://www.rta.qld.gov.au/Renting/During-a-tenancy/Living-in-the-property/Routine-inspectionsSecond para - “A routine inspection is not a housework inspection ...”It goes on to say that routine cleaning should take place before an inspection. It’s never happened to me, and if it did I wouldn’t let the issue go without having lots to say, but some tenants report ridiculous things mentioned as part of their inspections like a hair in the sink, a water splash mark on a bench and on and on. REAs and owners have adopted the habit in recent years of attaching what are end-of-lease cleaning checklists to every inspection notice. I just ignore them.
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                • foxje about 2 months ago
                  Lol housework or housekeepping.... big difference sorry and your initial post said house keeping. .
          • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
            The general tenanct agreement just says ‘clean’ with no mention of ‘tidy’.
          • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
            that clause may well be illegal....because its subjective. There are all sorts of problems like mould and vermin that are caused by lack of maintenance, no matter how clean and tidy the house is kept. People cannot or should not be breached or threatened for simply living a normal family life and yet they are, often, in my data.
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            • foxje about 2 months ago
              It’s in the standard tenancy agreement so I would be surprised if it is illegal. Certainly subjectivity does not nullify a clause automatically, it just needs to be interpreted reasonably. So no doubt the RTA or QCAT would look to see what the cause of the mould or vermin was. I’m curious as to the evidence of people often being threatened? Is it the 233 people you surveyed for your PhD? Is that the only evidence you have?
      • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
        I don’t hear constant stories of IRREVERSIBLE damage at all. These stories are usually what we see from time to time on A Current Affair and 9 times out of 10 the tenant(s) responsible have a past history of doing the same at other rentals with the present owner(s) saying ‘well, I just wanted to give them another chance etc etc’ when the truth is they’re the only kinds of tenants they could get. The very vast majority of tenants are not vandals. If the owner has a decent property to rent in a decent and safe area they’ll attract good tenants.
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        • foxje about 2 months ago
          Sure, so what do we do about the small minority of tenants? Kick them out on the street? Or try and give the owners the option to inspect regularly and control the downside risk of taking on perhaps some less fortunate tenants?
      • Leone.Christie about 2 months ago
        I.suggest that if your agents aren't doing inspections then you find a better one. Damage can be.done in.the blink.of an.eye.so.how does an.inspection every three months stop that... It doesn't
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        • foxje about 2 months ago
          Damage can also be done over a period of time ie mould, rot, stains. 12 week check ups can stop those, a lot better than 6 month checks can.
      • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
        Unless there is documentation of the stories of damage being done this is just heresay. The RTA data on bond returns does not bear this out. Owners and agents have their own subjective ,often biased, sometimes racist opinions as to who makes a good tenant for them.
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        • foxje about 2 months ago
          Hi Angela, out of curiosity do you have any evidence or documentation for accusing some agents and owners of racism? Sounds awfully like hearsay.
  • Debbie Russell about 2 months ago
    As a property manager fair time is given to the tenant with regards to the entry to the unit for repairs / inspections and showing properties for rentals. However it has been in my experience tenants want repairs done but at what is convenient for them not what can be booked in and repaired as soon as possible. Then the tenants complain that the repairs are taking too long... Tenants need to remember that repairs need to happen as soon as possible otherwise the issue will get worse with time.When it comes to property inspections - tenants think that they are the "only" ones within the realestate agents portfolio this is not the case as a property manager we can and do have up to 200 properties to do maintenance, inspections, lease renewals, show properties for rentals - so yes their is a time constraint to ensure all items and the properties are to an acceptable standard. And therefore we cannot change inspections to suit the tenant in fact it would be easier to the tenant to work with the property agent.As a property agent we are disgusted to hear that tenants think we have time to go through their personal items; with time constraints we have at lease 15 routine inspections in a day and need to drive to the properties therefore the routines inspections need to take 15 min to complete to ensure all routines are completed on time and within the time frame allocated.
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    • irtapil about 2 months ago
      As a tenant, tor non urgent repairs i certainly prefer convenient timing over swift completion. It depends what it is of course, if i have no running water (or no hot water) i want that fixed ASAP and i'll work around whenever they can come.
    • Talon about 2 months ago
      And this is exactly why it should be legislated that a PM can only manage a certain amount of properties. Having too many leads to this, no time to be flexible. Lack of flexibility leads to the other party feeling marginalised and results in resentment..no one is happy. That is bad practise. IF a PM had more time they could be more flexible with tenants, who then would feel that their needs ALSO matter (not in entirety but at least in part, which is not the case in the slightest right now). Just as people do not want pets in their house because one trashed it once, some tenants wan t to be home for inspections because a PM in the past HAS gone through their possessions when they were not home. That is not an urban myth. I find complete lack of flexibility for routine inspections is a recent development, and I wonder how much of it relates to some agents renting properties that are too far away from their offices.
  • Talon about 2 months ago
    I think the current rules around entry and quite good and balanced. There is an issue with how often inspections are done though. 3 months is a bit much considering the high expectations of the tenant's cleaning prowess, also when they are booked right before or after Christmas. I think there should be allowances for long term tenants with a proven clean record to request 6monthly inspections..whether they get approved or not is another thing but right now the rules are 3 months so that is it. You either get every 3 months on the dot! Or you get almost never from lazy agents who put the owner's property at risk. 3 months is pretty ridiculous when you've been a tenant at the same property for 5+ years and still get inspected every 3 months just so they can annoy you (some do it on purpose).In terms of re-letting or selling, entries should not be required at all. When a tenant is having to pack everything, house hunt, juggle that with a job, then throw weekly inspections in for new tenants or buyers, it's too much. They don't have to clean the place for those but they are EXPECTED to have it in SHOWROOM condition by the REA, and if they don't will be treated badly and sometimes threatened with a bad reference. I think BEHAVIOUR of agent representatives who do the entering (property managers) is THE issue. We need the REA Code of Conduct to be reinstated! They can threaten a tenant, be abusive, intimidating on purpose and discriminate against the vulnerable with NO recourse for the tenant. THAT is the real issue.
  • sandram about 2 months ago
    sometimes get 3-4 weeks notice of entry other times it is 5-7 days what is it supposed to be then they are nearly always late
  • irtapil 2 months ago
    The current rules make my rental accommodation really not feel like home. Ideally entry should be only with tenant consent, with entry requests instead of notices (for non emergencies) e.g. "dear Tenants, which day this week suits you for a fire safety inspection?" instead of the current "fire safety inspection is tomorrow, if you're not home, we'll let ourselves in." It really doesn't feel like my home if strangers can let themselves in without my permission. Also there should be far fewer inspections, especially for tenants who've been in the same property for a few years. Inspections every three months makes sense for the first six months, but when i've lived somewhere for four or five years it's excessive. It feels relentless.
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    • reacon 2 months ago
      if you are a long term tennant and sign long contracts such as 2 years you can negotiate the number of inspections down to 2 per year. As a property owner we are legally obliged by our insurance providers to do inspections or else they have a legal reason to not pay up in the case of catastrophy.
      Hide Replies (3)
      • irtapil 2 months ago
        then we need to change the rules around insurance as well.
      • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
        Insurance companies would not stipulate how many inspections per annum. This should be flexible, dependent on need.
      • Allyoz 2 months ago
        The legal obligation to do inspections by the insurance company is understandable, however, does the insurance company stipulate how often and what should be inspected? Isn't it the legal obligation of the owner to ensure that the property is safe, with or without the insurance factor taken into account? Just wondering.
    • BronwynJ 2 months ago
      How do you actually think we should handle only doing a fire smoke alarm inspection if we can only go when it suits you? What if nothing suits you in the 30 days prior to your lease renewal and then we haven’t met our legal requirements? As a PM we try really hard to work with our tenants and treat them well but we still have a job to do.
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      • irtapil 2 months ago
        that's why in my example i say "next week", if no time suits within a reasonable timeframe then the Tenant has to pick the least bad time.
      • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
        Why can't annual compliance inspections (fire, insurance, a maintenance schedule, be done as part of a regular inspection? And limit those to 3 or less per annum. Tradies, sales, and rental inspections all add up to too many.
        Hide Replies (9)
        • T17 2 months ago
          So smoke alarm contractors, insurance companies, tradesman, property managers and owners all should go the same time?? If you can manage to organise all those people on the same day and time within a window that suits only the tenant you are surely a magician.
          Hide reply (1)
          • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
            I suggest that if you are running a small business or an agency managing property investing then you need to manage things better. That's the job. A weeks window in between tenancies should be ample.
        • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
          No wonder some tenants don’t report non-urgent maintenance matters quickly - and I’ve certainly been one of them - when we are bombarded with people coming into the property all the time. We do it for some privacy and to reduce the anxiety of another call and another person coming in when we’re not home. I had 3-monthly routine inspections, fire door, smoke alarm, pest control, and prospective buyers (three times) all coming through at my last place that it seemed like every month I’d receive entry notices. Add maintenance on to that and I’m sorry but only the really urgent things got reported immediately. I know properties have to be maintained, and there are certain compliance checks that have to be done, but constantly having people in and out of the property mostly when they can’t be there causes a not insignificant number of tenants a lot of angst.
          Hide Replies (4)
          • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
            your anecdote reflects my data...visualised as a polarity of 'Renting in my experience is.....Managed for investor/agent outcomes...................................Geared to the needs of renters to feel at home. 229 people placed their own experience on this polarity. Very very few renters manage to reside in the balance point. Those 'rental tales' are instructive for this process so hopefully the HPW folks are reading these threads, and the research submissions carefully. One can only hope they will read the most up to date research on the rental experience and ask questions. They can always contact me for more information.
          • Fc35 about 2 months ago
            By not reporting ‘non essential’ maintenance you run the risk of being made responsible for further deterioration the unreported maintenance may cause.
            Hide Replies (2)
            • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
              I’ve never lost any part of my bond in many decades of renting and I don’t see that changing any time soon. I know what deteriorates quickly and what doesn’t. I don’t continue to try using something that’s broken. When it annoys me enough I report it.
            • irtapil about 2 months ago
              if the tenant does not have constant invasions they will be more willing to report stuff
        • Fc35 about 2 months ago
          Because coordinating all of these inspections to take place at a tenants convenience is completely impractical, trades & smoke alarm companies have their own businesses to run. A better solution is to be available yourself or have a trusted friend or relative.
          Hide reply (1)
          • Cathe_78 about 2 months ago
            Actually, the easiest approach is to ask the tradie to call the tenant and arrange a time that suits them both. Some of the real estate agents/landlords I've rented from take this approach and it usually works out fine.
  • Michelle2018 about 2 months ago
    24 hour notice is okay, sometimes in an emergency this should be ignored. For example water leaks or other major problems that arise that need immediate care to avoid damage to a property, or make it safe to be in.
  • Dozer54 about 2 months ago
    48 hours
  • Von about 2 months ago
    For repairs or any entry all day or all morning on entry notice is not realistic for most people who work. Two hours duration is reasonable for most people. No-one is home all day for an entry and if the tradesman or repairer is running late or not coming notice to the tenant would be courteous and not waste the tenants time.
  • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
    All these owners who are insistent that 3-monthly inspections are essential to keep on top of maintenance would have us believe tenants are living in perfectly maintained properties. We tenants know that’s so often not the case. Owners should be made to follow up on any issues that are identified during routine inspections. Current legislation essentially makes it optional for owners to do anything other than urgent repairs and that basically says routine inspections aren’t so much about maintenance rather an opportunity to constantly check up on the tenant.
  • Fay about 2 months ago
    I am satisfied with the present arrangements with the tenancy agreement as my tenant is not to be harassed by visits without appointment. Reasons for entry are generally for sighting repairs as the agent does regular checks as per the rental agreement as to the condition of the property. Requests are prompt to myself for repairs to be done with a copy of the report.
  • RebeccaPM about 2 months ago
    Quarterly inspections are often too much an a nuisance for both real estate agents and tenants. There is definitely not much change between 13 week inspections, but 6 monthly is definitely too far apart for any preventative maintenance. 3 routine inspections a year I believe would be fair to all to ensure the property has no maintenance. I'm willing to work (within reason) with my tenants if they have a concern with me entering the property unsupervised, however after they meet me and we develop a relationship it's often not a problem to enter unsupervised any longer - Property managers are not interested in whats in your sock drawer or your medicine cabinet, honestly we don't want to, nor have the time to snoop. However tenants do need to understand that we do enjoy work/life balance as much as the next guy, and like weekends to spend time with our families as well, so working together is paramount.In regards to fire inspections they are to be done ONCE every 12 months, or on Lease Renewal, so really at max it should be 2 at MAX in a year this is for the TENANTS SAFETY as well as the landlord's and agents liability. This needn't change. I find most tenants are willing to work with trades people in regards to access for maintenance as most time the tenant's want the items fixed asap anyway and as a property manager, I will generally let the tradesperson and tenant work it out amongst themselves, as my tradies are flexible with tenant schedules. The only time I issue an entry notice is if no one can get a hold of the tenant and the maintenance NEEDS to be done ASAP. Open homes for sales agents should be set at once a week (on a Saturday) - and by appointment with tenant approval if outside this open time.
  • Shell75 about 2 months ago
    Some real estates ask for you to complete with all details before you ever look at a property. I don't think this is right as if the property is not suitable they have a completed form that is signed.My latest property I am renting has still not been fixed and I have been here for about four months (eg no power to shed (shed did have power but they turned it off as they didn't want to fix power points and light switch), exposed power lines in the laundry (real estate said put cupboard against it) Door does not have a lock on it and glass door not installed properly. Rumpus room not sealed properly and water comes in in two spots so far and leaves come in under roof.)Real Estates need to have the power to MAKE owners fix properties to a safe standard. Also I think they need to start doing a safety audit before tenants move in and then every year of tenancy.
  • Benthemagnificent about 2 months ago
    Minimum notice period should be 72 hours
    Hide reply (1)
    • irtapil about 2 months ago
      with an exception for the tenant giving permission for repairs they want done quickly
  • irtapil about 2 months ago
    Mandatory times for maintenance completion could be counter productive, sometimes if it's not bothering the tenant (and not going to get worse) they'd rather a thing waited till they moved out. e.g. an problem with a thing the tenants don't use, causes no trouble for tenants but massive disruption to fix. It needs a safeguard of "if tenants request maintenance" or it will make renting WORSE.
  • Paul Butler about 2 months ago
    Current legislation appears satisfactory. Reasonable reasons for entry would be for: maintenance, routine inspections, urgent repairs, suspicion of or known damage being done to property. Should there be suspicion of malicious damage then immediate access should be allowed, with Police if necessary.
  • KaTeMc about 2 months ago
    My last landlord insisted on cash rental payments and turned up at my door every second Thursday evening with a like or lump it approach and an unwillingness to accept electronic payments. This type of regular entry is an invasion of privacy. These kinds of practices need to stop.
    Hide Replies (2)
    • foxje about 2 months ago
      By law he must provide you with 2 options of rental payment, so request another method!
    • Fc35 about 2 months ago
      What he is doing is illegal, but you need to make a formal complaint to the RTA or the very least breach him. How can the authorities address this & prosecute of you do nothing?
  • Shellz 2 months ago
    Our rental property is for sale and it is like living in a fishbowl/shop front window, whilst paying full price for the privilege, and being intimidated and bullied into the bargain. I have jokingly said I may as well put up a McDonald's sign that says open all hours as we have absolutely NO Quiet Enjoyment, NO Privacy, are expected to keep the place like a show home all the time, and have a Real Estate Agent that doesn't follow the RTA Regulations whatsoever, turns up unannounced, unlawfully enters our driveway and drives around our house to show perspective buyers without consent or even any form of notice anytime he wishes, speaks to us and treats us with utter contempt, hasn't given us 24 hours notice or a Form 9 entry notice filled in correctly with the number of people attending the sales inspection, bullies, harasses and tries to intimidate us by saying he will enter whether we agree to the day and time or not. I am a retired Prison Officer and Criminals get treated better than we have been. We have ALWAYS done the right thing entirely, paid our rent in advance, often an extra couple of weeks in advance, NEVER been late and respect the properties we have rented as if they are our own, keep the property as clean and tidy as humanly possible and have only ever had one other horror of a Real Estate Agent in 32 years of renting properties. We have just had to put this Real Estate Agent in Breach and issue a Form 11 yesterday on several of these grounds, and was told by the RTA to call Police should this Agent try to bully us and force his way into our rental property. Living here in fear of constant home invasions is appalling, and we are more than stressed and have lost hours of time, as it has taken phone calls to RTA, phone calls to the Police, sms messages and phone calls to this totally disrespectful Mafia like Agent (who Manages the rental as well as has it listed for sale) several emails to this Agent, filing out a Form 11 Breach Form and having to email it late yesterday (yes, late on a Friday afternoon). Now we expect to have to fight this further through RTA and QCat, and expect to receive a retaliatory eviction notice, all because he wants to sell the property and doesn't give a damn about how he treats us in the process. This system is not at all fair, and as Tenants we are the ones that have to fight for our lives, our rights and prove that this disgusting excuse for a human being is in the wrong? Try doing this when you have a Husband with chronic, severe PTSD and you are also suffering severe debilitating health issues. If we could afford to get a Mortgage we would, in fact at the moment living on the streets would afford us better privacy and quiet enjoyment. I wish someone at RTA would finally have the guts to put into law and decide what the word reasonable means when it comes to the number and frequency of sales inspections for a start. We have tried to be more than reasonable with making times for sales inspections, however he seems to believe that he can do whatever the hell he wants. We asked if this place was likely to be put up for sale when we were looking to rent it 10 months ago, and was told no, they are investors as it is a company and they are not likely to sell for years. Wish we had never laid eyes on the place. This has cost us both financially (moving costs, installation of NBN etc) and definitely has taken a toll on our physical and mental health, yet we have to fight just to be treated fairly? The system really needs to change dramatically, as currently tenants appear to have NO rights whatsoever, not even human rights.
    Hide Replies (11)
    • Van 2 months ago
      I'm so sorry you've had to put up with this. I have been through three sales as a renter, including two at the same property. Every time it's been tremendously stressful and I felt like I was being treated with contempt by the selling agent, although nowhere near as badly as you are. I think tenants should be compensated if a property is up for sale, especially if it doesn't sell within a specified period of time. I also think the legislation needs to clarify what agents are allowed to do when it comes to entering the property to show prospective buyers around. At the moment there is no clarity on what the legal boundaries actually are.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Van 2 months ago
        I also don't believe there is any clarity in the Act on what prospective buyers are allowed to do when inspecting a property. I have started looking to buy myself, and I have seen other prospective buyers open cupboards and poke about in people's belongings. That needs to change because I think that unless you are committed to buying the property you should not be allowed to do that.
    • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
      Shellz this an awful situation. As a property manager I have had to deal with selling agents and while most are respectful of tenants' rights some are not. I suspect it depends on how much pressure the owner is putting on the agent to get a buyer or perhaps some people are just plain inconsiderate and ignorant. However I must admit I have never come across an agent who behaves as badly as the one you are having to deal with. Maybe this is because I am the property manager not the selling agent as well. As you say the problem lies within the act as is only says inspections must take place at reasonable times and that there must be a reasonable time between inspections. I hate the term reasonable. Reasonableness is a slippery concept and what is reasonable to you may not be reasonable to me. I believe the act needs to clearly state how many inspections per week are allowed and how much time should elapse between inspections unless all parties agree otherwise in writing. I know owners sometimes reduce the rent while the property is for sale in consideration of the inconvenience caused to tenants by inspections. One owner whose property I managed reduced the rent $100 per week although this amount is unusual. This is an area of the act that really needs review. Owners do have a right to sell their property. I would never tell a tenant that the owner had no intention of selling because an owner's circumstances can change in a couple months making a sale necessary but everyone's rights must be laid out in law. This area of the act needs urgent attention.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • Van 2 months ago
        I agree, Emmadeanne. "Reasonable" can mean anything. It needs to be clarified, and "reasonable" actually needs to be reasonable.I do understand that sometimes owners need to sell their properties, but I think it needs to be done with all consideration that the property is someone's home, not just an asset to be sold. I have had an agent come with no notice at dinner time to show my rental to prospective buyers. Those same agents moved my property around to take photos without permission and put those photos in advertisements, again without permission. In another case, the first I heard of the property being for sale was the "For Sale" sign in the front yard. It was a difficult property to sell because there was a problem with it, so it was on the market for months both times it went up for sale. I think I lived there for about three years. I reckon the place was up for sale for nine months of that time. I was offered no compensation for the inconvenience.
      • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
        Stipulating can be just as problematic as the ambiguous term 'reasonable'. I suggest a mix of both. By that I mean one window of 1-2 hours per week AND a negotiated compensation of a decrease in rent ($50 or $100) per week per entry with notice. Yes, owners have the right to sell their property but they should not have the right to interfere with the lives and homes of people living there beyond what's reasonable for the people living there. If an agent and/or owner has deceived renters to take on a place under certain understandings (no plans to sell for 12 months for example...and get that in writing!) then the proprietary interests should cop the financial disadvantage if they want to change course. This financial penalty and compensation would encourage more honesty and fairness.
    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      I don’t believe it is a requirement to put the number of people entering to inspect a property that is for sale and it shouldn’t be. The owner if the property probably had no intention of selling the property 20 months ago but personal circumstances change. If a property is pjafed for sale during a tenancy I believe the tenant should be able to vacate by giving the agent 2 weeks notice.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • Van about 2 months ago
        I agree that if the property is put up for sale the tenant should be able to leave with no penalty and two-weeks' notice, regardless of how long their lease is for.
      • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
        Yes, tenants should be given the option.
    • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
      Gosh! this agent sounds like he works for the same one managing my property! I absolutely agree it's high time the RTA were given some teeth in order to prevent the bullying and disregard for tenants rights.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Fc35 about 2 months ago
        The RTA are able to prosecute agents & lessors for breaches of act, however they can act if tenants don’t make a formal complaint. You can’t not exercise your right & then complain nothing gets done or the RTA ‘don’t have teeth’.
    • foxje about 2 months ago
      What a terrible story. Wth respect, however, I am not sure the system needs to be changed as nearly everything the agent did was illegal. Perhaps better compliance and penalties?
  • Dirst 2 months ago
    3 monthly inspections for long term tenants are invasive. After an initial probationary period....say 12 months.. routine inspections should change to 6monthly. We have an on-site manager who we see almost everyday and can come knock on your door if he wanted to which is fine as we look after our property so I dont know why we have to have a compulsory three month walk through.
    Hide Replies (14)
    • Lillian 2 months ago
      It is mainly maintenance
      Hide reply (1)
      • irtapil 2 months ago
        Removed by moderator.
    • ruralsue 2 months ago
      This is fine with an on site manager. I think it is more challenging when the property is a house that no one passes on a regular basis.
      Hide Replies (9)
      • Kpsubs 2 months ago
        This is from the view that a tenant is not trustworthy nor are they living in the property as their home. Where a tenant has shown they are trustworthy and want to live in the place in the medium term, things should be changed. It is this fear that the tenants are doing harm that is really disrespectful to those living in rentsl properties
        Hide Replies (8)
        • foxje about 2 months ago
          The question is, who decides a tenant is trustworthy and responsible...
          Hide Replies (7)
          • Kpsubs about 2 months ago
            However you look at people, that is the way they are. If you think people are not trustworthy and responsible, that is who is going to cross your path regardless of the mechanisms in place. I live in a block with many rentals and it really depends on the vigilance of the agent whether the building is a happy building or something less savoury.
          • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
            Prior rental history and reference checks sorts most of that out.
            Hide Replies (5)
            • foxje about 2 months ago
              All that will happen is agents will start reporting tenants for really minor infringements so that the tenants are on the list and they can justify doing 3 month inspections.
              Hide Replies (4)
              • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
                On what list? What do you mean by reporting them for minor infringements?
                Hide Replies (2)
                • foxje about 2 months ago
                  A tenancy database....
                  Hide reply (1)
                  • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
                    Lol. A tenant can only be listed on a tenancy database for amounts owing if the amount owing exceeds the bond, for objectionable behaviour and only if QCAT has terminated the lease for that reason, and for repeated breaches also only if QCAT has terminated the lease for that reason. That’s it.
              • Fc35 about 2 months ago
                Your comment makes no sense
    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      Maintenance that doesn’t get reported by a tenant. Leaking tals are a huge issue. Some tenants save their maintenance for inspections.
      Hide reply (1)
      • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
        Removed by moderator.
  • NS1968 2 months ago
    I have had a real estate agent / property manager insist on inspecting a rental property every three months, on the dot, over four years of renting the same house. The house was kept in impeccable order (we were awarded a 'tidy tenant' award for being their 'best tenant'). The agency/agent flat REFUSED to EVER renegotiate inspection times so that I could be there, and always let themselves in with their own key. Occasionally, they moved things, left cupboard doors open (doors to my own furniture, not built-ins), and on two occasions helped themselves to food from the kitchen (fruit from the fruit bowl on one occasion, and a slice of cake on another). Several times they failed to properly lock the front door when leaving the property after inspection.In addition, without my consent or knowledge, they photographed the interior of my home and posted these images on their social media WITHOUT any consultation/without my consent. Although this was ostensibly to promote how wonderful their tenant/s are, I did not appreciate the violation of my right to privacy, or their lack of discretion.I think, as many have already said, that while regular inspections for structural and maintenance purposes are necessary, three-monthly inspections are excessive over a long tenancy. I agree that more regular inspections on first moving in (say, in the first year) can establish a tenant's level of care of the home, and after that can be less regular (say, annual).
    Hide Replies (12)
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      Wow. Your rental tale speak volumes about the 'proprietariness' - the sense of entitlement based in a proprietary interest - in the private rental system here. What most people, including policy and advocacy folks fail to acknowledge is that the system is inherently skewed towards those interests because there are two sets of these...the agent and the property owner, as opposed to the one, other party, the renters. So its kind of 2/3s to 1/3 at the starting gate. We as a polity cannot adequately ensure that agents and owners will do the decent thing in part because there is no, easy financial penalty, whereas tenants will lose bond for the slightest of reasons because 'bond gouging' has become part of the business model for some, unregulated parties. I know investors and agents are up in arms about the possibility of even pretty minor changes to make rental life more like an ordinary home/life but really, this tale (like so may I captured in the 'renters at home' research) captures the social complexity of poor attitudes and behaviours that need to be addressed in ways that shift the culture of the system towards a normal home life for renters, especially once their bonafides, have been well established. Seeing legislation and regulation (without simple and effective compliance measures that don't impact on renters' daily lives too much) as the solution suggests an incomplete understanding of the social complexity of the problem
    • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
      If these allegations can be proved this agent's behaviour was despicable and should have been reported not only the principal of the agency involved but to the RTA. This type of behaviour gets good agents and onsite managers a bad reputation. I will always negotiate a suitable time for an inspection with a tenant so they can be present if they wish. In fact I would prefer a tenant to be home for the inspection not only to discuss any problems but so I am not going to be accused of any wrong doing. The issue of sending photographs to an owner is a cloudy to say the least. Most owners of the properties I manage live interstate so like photographs so they can at least see their property is being taken care of. I asked the RTA for advise on this and was told that it is ok to take photos and send them to the owner without the tenants' permission. I ask owners to sign a disclaimer saying they will not post any photos on social media use them for any purpose other than to see their property but my disclaimer would not have any legal standing. I believe this is an area where the RTA needs a definite policy and is an area where the legislation has fallen behind technology. I would suggest the legislation allow photos preferably with the tenants' permission but that these photos are for the owners information only and may not be used for other purposes without the tenants' permission. Agents really do not need to photograph a property during a tenancy unless there are problems. For the most part I have been able to let owners see their property by using Skype for inspections. This leaves no permanent record. All owners who have participated in Skyped inspections have been happy with this and in fact prefer it to photographs and in these instances all tenants have been happy with this situation.
      Hide Replies (7)
      • NS1968 2 months ago
        Hi Emma. I did report these things to the RTA, as I felt they were significant breaches of ... protocol?I agree that the issue of photographs is one that needs careful consideration in terms of weighing up a tenants' right to privacy, and an owner's right to 'see' the state of the property. Perhaps images should only be able to be taken of particular aspects of a property, or under certain conditions. I agree with what I think you're saying, too, that whatever rules there are around TAKING images, there needs to be some careful discussion and appropriate rules around USING/STORING those images. :)
        Hide Replies (3)
        • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
          Completely agree. There needs to be clear rules regarding the taking, using and storing of photographs. Both tenants and property managers need to know exactly where they stand in regard to this. At present the RTA legislation is vague but when this version of the act was written there was no social media as such. The act must state in clear terms what is permissible and what is not and consider future technological developments but at the same time balance the owners' rights to view their property with the tenants' right to privacy. Have to give this some thought for my submission.
          Hide reply (1)
          • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
            Owners have the right to attend routine inspections even if they have an agent managing their property. If they live in another region or interstate too bad. The taking of photos/videos is a massive invasion of privacy for tenants and is totally unnecessary. Agents can report in writing any issues with the property. Unless agents actually do the right thing and only take close-up photos of damage it’s impossible to not include a tenant’s possessions in the photos.
        • foxje about 2 months ago
          Putting images of your things on social media without permission is certainly against the Act, the RTA should have acted to penalise the agent.
      • Tammy N 2 months ago
        I have rented for over 20 years and for the last 15 years have never had a real estate agent or property manager negotiate a time for inspections. They state that they will be here some time within a 5 hour period and that the time frame is not negotiable, as if I am not able to be home they will let them selves in. It is usually a different representative of the agency each time so I do not know the person coming. When I first began renting the inspections were 6 monthly for the first year and then annually. About 15 years ago I was informed that rules had changed and inspections were to be three monthly with no possible negotiation on this.
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        • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
          Tammy I am in a bit of a different position to real estate agent property managers. I am an onsite manager so actually live in the complex where most of the properties in my letting pool are situated. I have some properties outside the complex but they are all quite close, no more than a ten minute drive away so I am in a better position to negotiate times than a property manager who has 200 properties scattered all over Brisbane. To make the situation worse for tenants many large agencies outsource their inspections to companies that specialise in just doing inspections. These people have to do a lot of inspections each day so I guess they would be unlikely to negotiate a time. I am puzzled by the five hour time frame as the RTA entry notice clearly states that the owner/property manager must state a two hour time frame for entry. There is a space on the form for this. I believe that this would also apply to secondary agents such as specialised inspectors as they are working for the agency the owner uses to manage the property.
      • Van 2 months ago
        I agree that the Act is way behind modern technology - it doesn't acknowledge the ease with which digital photographs can be taken and disseminated. Thank you for being one of the good agents who has respect for tenants.
    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      These inspections are carried out to check for owner maintenance and to also check the tenant is not damaging a property. I don’t care what your personal living habits are unless those habits are damaging the property.
    • bartj about 2 months ago
      I don't know where agents get off to be honest, I've never trusted an agent in my home when I'm not there. These people are complete strangers and I've got no reason to trust they won't rifle through my things or steal from me. I find they're very respectful and brief when I'm with them though...
    • Fc35 about 2 months ago
      Wow, absolutely disgusting that anyone would interfere with your property and steal, I would have reported the behavior & breached the agent.With regards to the regularity of inspections, agents have written agreements with owner that stipulate how many inspections will be conducted per year, failure to complete them would a breach of their contract. The appointment of agent forms would need to change, for example simply state the maximum allowed.
  • Debdu 2 months ago
    All inspection I have been issued with have been appropriate and respectful. However for long term tenants with no issues 3 monthly inspections are a bit much i would rather have at most 6 monthly or annual... I think if there issues real estates should have the option of have very frequent inspection monthly until things are in order
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    • GeeGee 2 months ago
      I agree. When I have long term tenants and I have a good relationship with them, I only inspect once a year when we renew the lease.
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      I'm not sure about monthly....but the bigger point is about managing dependent on the situation. And property managers are often young with very little, life or work experience. Property managers would do well to be trained up by the community sector housing managers who do a much much better job.
      Hide Replies (4)
      • JaniceAC 2 months ago
        I do agree that property managers need more life skills than a younger person has but how did you decide that community housing sector managers do a better job?
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
          Just ask their tenants. Tenants in public and community housing are treated far better than those of us stuck in the private rental market but that’s a whole different thread.
        • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
          My PhD research data and analysis is clear on this. Community sector focus is on tenants for starters, not the profit of agents and owners. yes there area few minor issues tenants have with management but when diving into the patterns of what supports renters security and sense of home almost all the data exemplifying that related to community housing, ....plus a few private owners who self manage in a very hands off way (no inspections and allow tenants to make the place home for long periods of time) and who get very happy renters who take excellent care of the property in return for decent treatment.
      • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
        Yes, managing dependent on the situation doesn’t seem to enter into the equation. I’ve only ever rented 1 or 2 bedroom units and have still been subjected to three-monthly inspections. There’s no yard to check up on and very few rooms. Houses, with more bedrooms etc and outside areas, probably need a bit more surveillance than the types of properties I’ve ever rented.
  • Dan94 2 months ago
    A tough one, considering every tenant is different! I’ve lived at places where inspections are every 3 months dead on - I moved out the day my lease ended for this reason. I also lived in a rental for 4 years and in the first 2 years had no inspections, then over the following 2 years they were 6 monthly. I found this to be a good balance. Where I am now I’ve only lived for 13 months and inspections have been every 4 months, although I find these ones to be too invasive - photos of possessions, every room needing to be photographed for the owners. I told them this would not be happening during the inspections and instead if they wished to photograph any damages (there has never been any) then they were welcome to do so. I think if you’ve got a proven consistent good track record during routine inspections, they should be every 6 months. However, if you’ve buggered up a few times, maybe they should be carried out more often. After all, someone with a negative history is being put in charge of someone’s investment, and they made the choice to do the wrong thing. I also think some parts of the house should be avoided, for example, the walk in, we keep our most private possessions in there so I find it odd someone can just waltz on in and check it out in the name of “routine inspections”. Routine inspections are the only daunting part of renting for me.
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    • Lillian 2 months ago
      I have been a tenant and realise the privacy that is required.
    • Fc35 about 2 months ago
      Routine inspections are a necessary evil, in fact if an owner ever made an insurance claim one of the first thing the insurance company will ask to see is copies of inspection reports. In QLD 3 monthly inspections are the maximum an agent/lessor can conduct, to do no inspections for 2 years is nothing short of negligent on the agents behalf, they are appointed by the owner to look after an investment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. I agree with you regarding photos, and I believe this may be one aspect that we may see changes with in legislation. As far as looking in walk in robes, it is part of the property, a property managers worst nightmare is that a tenant may be involved in illegal activity (happens way too often) if this were the case and the property manager had failed to inspect areas such as walk in robes there would be serious consequences.
    • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
      I’ve always refused photos during inspections but who knows what they did the times I was unable to be there. There is absolutely no need for photos and now videos. Just because it’s convenient for the REA doesn’t make it right. Not so long ago agents actually wrote down what they saw during an inspection. Interestingly, the RTA has removed all information on their website relating to the taking of photos/videos during routine inspections. Previously, because it’s not mentioned specifically in the Act, they said it was up to negotiation between tenant/REA. Now they don’t even say that which I see as a good thing.
  • Leone.Christie about 2 months ago
    Three monthly inspections are intrusive and not.necessary. Our real estate agent doesn't even leave a card to suggest that they have entered the property. If home owners had a stranger walk.into.their homes every.three months to ' inspect' the premises there would be.an.outcry. If there is nothing to suggest any.illegal activities or anything contry to the lease agreement is going then an inspection once.every six months is.more than.suffice
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    • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
      As would there be an outcry if they were expected to allow tradies into their homes while they weren’t there or worse still know the tradies have been given the keys to the property. My last lazy onsite PM would just give the fire door and smoke alarm guys the master key to go into all the units without supervision. Tenants at work had no idea this was happening.
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      • Leone.Christie about 2 months ago
        I've come home to the owner of the property and his son, putting a cnr door back up in the kitchen as it was broken. I was not given any notice.at all...I walked into my home to find two men in the kitchen, they then tried to pretend that they were 'workers' sent.out by the real estate!
  • hsr about 2 months ago
    As a landlord (and previous renter in 3 other states), I see the 3monthly inspections as unnecessary. Maybe a 3months at the start of a lease, but then 6 months or so. If there are maintenance issues these can be raised by the tenant any time. I have never heard of a spate in irrevocable damage caused by tenants. And as an aside, I consider housekeeping to be not a part of a routine inspection. Respect for the property, yes, folding clothes etc, no
    Hide reply (1)
    • foxje about 2 months ago
      Sorry what do you mean by irrevocable damage?I ageee folding clothes are not part of an inspector. However housekeeping (as opposed to house work) is a reflection on the cleanliness of the house which is a condition of lease and therefore relevant.
  • Tammy Vitale about 2 months ago
    Entry Notices and rights work well in Queensland and I believe the periods and reasons for entry are appropriate and satisfactory.
  • tallowood19 about 2 months ago
    First inspection should be 3 months, then every 6 months to ensure your Property is being looked after. They are balanced now please leave along. Valid now leave them alone
  • Jan1147 2 months ago
    1. If no agent is involved, a landlord seems to ignore the rules and violates entry protocol.2. No issues provided rules are abided by.3. Inspections every 3 months is intrusive especially when there are no problems with the tenant looking after the property.
    Hide Replies (7)
    • GeeGee 2 months ago
      We do not use an agent and abide by all the laws regarding entry. I've heard to opposite about some agents.
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      Agents ignore the rules too.
      Hide reply (1)
      • JaniceAC 2 months ago
        If I ignored the rules I wouldn’t have a job.
    • foxje about 2 months ago
      I also manage my rentals privately and always adhere to the entry requirements. Private management also gives the best chance of reducing the number of inspections as you can make the call yourself without having to trust an agent. I rarely routine inspections as I know my tenants and trust them and they have taken care of my properties as if it were their own home, which is the win-win we should be looking for.
      Hide Replies (3)
      • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
        Most long-term renters won’t go anywhere near private landlords for many reasons not least of all they have a reputation for always popping around to check on the property. A lot do the maintenance themselves so that’s another opportunity to come check out how their investment is being looked after.
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        • foxje about 2 months ago
          That's renters' choice of course, however you have a lot more flexibility in discussing extension of the inspection times if you are working directly with the owner. Why would an owner waste their time inspecting if they are comfortable that the property is being well looked after - they're not being paid for this time.
          Hide reply (1)
          • Cleocattra about 2 months ago
            Like I said most tenants with a good rental history won’t go anywhere near private rentals for MANY reasons. It’s a FACT! I actually like that the owner of my current rental lives in another State. The further away the better.
  • Tammy N 2 months ago
    There is no privacy when the real estate agent or property manager is able to enter the property even if there is no-one home. Every Tennent should be able to be certain that no-one has entered the home when they are not there.
    Hide Replies (2)
    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      Proprty Managers work 8:30-5 (plus a lot of unpaid overtime) and cannot schedulecinspections for everyone’s different work hours.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
        If REAs gave up the robo-practice of the 3 monthly inspection regime (that is a only recent phenomenon and which has no evidence base for it) and extended it out to 6 or 12 months for highly refereed tenants then agents would have a LOT more time up their sleeves for important tasks like, for example, attending to maintenance issues, and doing proper reference checks. One size fits all property management practices are a nonsense that benefits almost nobody
  • Jkel about 2 months ago
    I believe the current entry times are acceptable
  • T17 2 months ago
    After reading a lot of these comments I'm not sure what a lot of people expect when renting. For sure tenants need to have their rights preserved and are entitled to a safe and habitable home. I bought an investment property with my family and we only just manage to make repayments. We have a lovely tenant who has never caused any trouble and always paid her rent. We keep up to date with the maintenance and even paid for her water one period because we had a fight with an insurance company that dragged on but she was very accommodating. In saying that if all these rules come into play e.g. removal of negative gearing, tenants not wanting annual inspections, tenants being able to make modifications without permission, restricting access to tradespeople, lease changes etc. it would just not be feasible to own a rental property as we could no longer afford it. We are surely not the only ones who would be in the same position so what happens when other owners start selling their properties and all of a sudden there are not enough rentals for tenants? Where does everyone expect to live? Public housing simply cannot cope with the current demand what would happen when owners suddenly cannot afford their home and banks force them to sell? It is all good to recommend changes but owners are people too and need to have some control over their investment.
    Hide Replies (9)
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      The attitude that an investment property is the investors home is problematic. Home is created by people dwelling in a place and when they can do that quite freely and without threat of being moved on quite regularly at someone else's insistence then again the research data shows that they will invest care, time and funds into looking after their home (and your investment).Over 40% of renters in my research moved 3-5 times in 5 years. over 80% moved 1-10 times in 5 years. 15% who got to stay in place still felt substantially challenged in the sense of security because they knew that could have to move for other peoples agendas.the housing is not going away, even if lots of investors bail. In the long run, bigger picture this is probably a good thing for housing people more securely but that's a much bigger and different conversation
      Hide reply (1)
      • foxje about 2 months ago
        It’s not the investors “home” but it is their PROPERTY. They are providing it as a HOME to a tenant based on a rental contract which both parties should have every right to stipulate what they require or desire.
    • Cathe_78 2 months ago
      Unfortunately, a lot of people have been encouraged to invest in property – when they really should have invested in something safer. The very-long-term history of property prices show that this is NOT a safe investment in the long run. Yes, we've had a two-decade (or more, by some arguments) run of increasing property prices, but this has been driven by changes to the tax laws (discounted capital gains tax rates, increases in negative gearing allowances, both of which are paid for by the rest of the tax-paying society, including renters). These changes encouraged people to invest in real estate – and artificially drove up the demand for real estate, and thus prices. This wasn't due to increases in the population or an underlying housing shortage. The other massive contributing factor was the banks' willingness (eagerness, really) to lend increasingly large amounts – and this increase in mortgage credit is the factor most strongly correlated with rising house prices. [And the current royal commission into the banking industry should help to dispel any doubts over their guilt in this matter.] All of this has inflated a truly immense property bubble in Australia, which has gone on longer than should have been physically possible! So long, in fact, that everyone now believes constantly rising house prices are normal. One of the effects of all of this has been to encourage many people to become landlords, without preparing them for the real costs and responsibilities of being landlords, and also leaving them extremely vulnerable to changes in house prices. I think there is probably a very good case for people caught in this trap to pursue class actions against the banks (especially when this bubble FINALLY bursts and a lot of people end up in deep trouble).
      Hide Replies (5)
      • Cathe_78 2 months ago
        And please don't accuse me of not working hard enough or saving enough to become a home owner. The amount you need to save for a deposit these days would have bought most houses outright before this bubble started (and general inflation does NOT account for that price difference!). I would have bought my own place years ago if I could have afforded it (and I work full time for a reasonable wage). Personally (and perhaps selfishly), I am looking forward to the bubble bursting, even with the pain it will cause to many investors, simply because it MIGHT finally give me a chance to buy my own place and not have to deal with all the small humiliations of renting any more.
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        • Cathe_78 2 months ago
          Or perhaps this is just a fantasy I keep telling myself so that I can pretend there is light at the end of the tunnel. The thought of still living this way when I grow old frightens me.
          Hide reply (1)
          • Tammy N 2 months ago
            I agree Cathe_78. I would have bought a home years ago if I was able to afford it, mainly to remove the insecurity and humiliation of renting. I also think it is a fantasy but keep telling myself there is a chance for a light at the end of the tunnel.
        • Van 2 months ago
          "Small humiliations" is an excellent way to describe it.
        • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
          Yes, the small humiliations. That sums up rental life in Australia.
    • bartj about 2 months ago
      T17, do you think your house will evaporate if you can't afford to own it? If there's a mass sell of of houses by investors, then it will become a buyers market, presumably prices will adjust accordingly - someone will buy it. Don't pretend you're providing a public service.
  • BronwynJ 2 months ago
    Entry needs to be granted for inspections and maintenance. Trying to achieve a time that suits tenants would be impossible for both property managers and tradies. As a PM currently we get complaints from our tradies that when they do try to phone tenants to make a convenient time to attend the property the tenants won’t answer the phone or reply to messages. Legislative requirements for smoke alarm checking would be impossible to met if it could only be done at a time suitable to the tenant. Other suggestions around longer times between inspections for great tenants has some merit but even great tenants can miss some maintenance items. Unfortunately we’ve times also when great tenants have let a flatmate move in who does the wrong thing. It’s usually the minority who do the wrong thing but our rental laws need to cater for them.
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    • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
      I wonder how you would feel BronwynJ if someone told you maintenance had been booked for your home and you didn't know the person or tradesperson coming and you were unable to be home to let them in. Again this is another indication of how little tenants and their personal property and privacy are respected or considered.
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      • BronwynJ about 2 months ago
        I understand your point, but how can we and the tradies do our jobs if tenants need to be home each time we want entry. How do we actually achieve that? There are so many great tenants but unfortunately the minority who do the wrong thing mean we need to be able to arrange access to the rentals. A water leak that takes a week to attend to can go from an $80 fix to the $500 fix in a very short time.
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        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          We had a water leak in our units recently, it was the long standing tenants who reported it not the property manager who had done an inspection the week before. It was reported directly to the owner as the property manager ignored requests to have it seen to. The leak was on the outside of the property not inside and was never inspected by the property manager who was busy taking photos inside a spotlessly clean and undamaged unit.
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          • BronwynJ about 2 months ago
            Ok, so you are wanting laws changed on the basis that there are some agents who do the wrong thing. Can you see my point, we need to have some laws in place to act because there are some tenants who do the wrong thing. I can tell you are a great tenant who cares about the property but sadly there are some that don't. Most of our laws are actually put in place to prevent actions of a few.
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            • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
              I think other people have answered this adequately but I will add that most of the laws in place are for the benefit of the owner and the agent not for the tenant. Many of us are tired of hearing how everything is our fault and beating our heads against brick walls to have maintenance issues resolved. Perhaps you need to remove your property manager hat and try seeing things from a tenant's point of view?
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              • BronwynJ about 2 months ago
                no I am not going to take my property management hat off. And simply because I run a great agency with 4 property managers who are very respectful of their tenants and work really hard to ensure a great relationship with both our tenants and owners. There are 3 people on the team - agents, tenants and owners and we all work together to ensure maintenance is attended to. I am not really disagreeing with you, I am trying to point out a balance is needed and both tenants and agents who do the wrong thing should be dealt with by the RTA, QCAT and the Office of Fair Trading as applicable. I am lobbying for an increase in the professional standards of Property Managers.
        • Sanch about 2 months ago
          Bronwyn, most of us, owners or tenants want to be home when Tradies come, and we seem to be able to manage that if we are treated like Adults and allowed to make our own calls and appointments.My Tenants call me, then go ahead and organise it themselves at times that suit them and Tradies, and the account is sent to me.Simples
    • Van about 2 months ago
      Bronwyn, I do understand what you're saying, but as a renter who tries my utmost to be responsible and cooperative I get frustrated when agents still treat me as if I'm one of the minority who do the wrong thing. It makes me feel like I'm getting treated like a schoolchild. I'd also check with your tradies to make sure they are calling tenants at a reasonable time. I've just organised maintenance with one of my agent's tradies. He called me four times before I got back to him. That sounds bad on my part, until I mention that three of those calls were outside normal business hours (two after 5pm and one on Saturday morning).As for even great tenants missing maintenance items, work with us. Tell us what you would you like us to look out for between inspections. Not all tenants would be bothered, sure, but there are a lot of us who would be happy to help.
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      • BronwynJ about 2 months ago
        Van, your note about 3 of the 4 times being a tradie ringing outside of hours -they do that because so many tenants can't answer their mobiles during work hours - so they are trying to be helpful. Also, the tradesman only have so many hours in the day they can allocate to admin, some of the time they actually have to do the work on the tools. This is what is so frustrating about a lot of these threads, everyone wants entry just to to suit them when it is going to be impossible for any rule changes to keep everyone happy.
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        • Van about 2 months ago
          Sure, I can understand that they're trying to be helpful and that they can't spend all day on admin. My point is that if people can't answer the phone after business hours - they might be engaged in leisure activities, as I was, or driving home from work - then you might get problems arranging times. I could have contacted him later in the evening, however I didn't want to do that because there was a good chance he would be having dinner or spending time with family. I ended up texting him so that he could respond at his leisure and we sorted it out, which is the important thing.Anyway, it's a pretty small issue in the grand scheme of things. I just thought I'd explain how it was from my point of view.
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          • Marie2402 about 2 months ago
            Normally people can’t answer their phones during business hours, it not normally the case for leisure periods....surely your work ethic is the wrong way around! If I had arrange maintenance for my home, I would make sure I would answer the tradies call so he could access to my property at a time that would be suitable for the both of us. I really don’t think your attitude towards the owner or the tradie is appropriate or fair. It’s not about working to your schedule, is about getting the job complete to make sure the owners property doesn’t get damage and as a tenant you can live in a safe environment.
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            • Van about 2 months ago
              Wow, you're making an awful lot of assumptions about my work ethic and the situation based on my one post. Actually, I was extremely busy at work that whole week as well, and when I say "leisure activities", I mean I was going for a brisk walk to relax and clear my head because I needed to switch off for a while due to the craziness of the week. The first day the tradie called was Thursday evening; I had a time arranged by Saturday evening. Had it not been a weekend, I probably would have had it sorted by Saturday morning. Considering the maintenance request was the equivalent of a broken cupboard door handle and not anything that could damage the property, I think that's reasonable. Had it been something urgent I would have called him back that night, regardless of whether I was concerned about interrupting his evening or not.
      • Fc35 about 2 months ago
        Van, organising trade work is never easy for anyone, do you not think that homeowners aren't similarly inconvenienced when something goes wrong & they need to organise a tradie visit? its always inconvenient when a tradesman needs to visit for whatever reason, and I hardly think calling someone on a Saturday morning is bad practice, in fact I think it shows great customer service.
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        • Van about 2 months ago
          I didn't say it was bad practice. Nor did I suggest that organising a tradie should be convenient. I was trying to explain, probably very badly, that in addition to being unable to answer the phone at work, people might not be available to answer the phone outside business hours all the time either.I think the moral of the story is that we're all busy whether we're tenants, agents or owners. We have work, we have obligations outside work, we have hobbies and families. We have to prioritise. Organising a tradie for a non-urgent repair, although important, might not jump immediately to the top of that list. If a tenant doesn't organise a non-urgent repair immediately, it might not be because they're being obstructive; it might be because they're busy.Of course, if they don't respond within a reasonable period of time, the agent should be able to issue a notice to enter.
  • Over it 2 months ago
    I am a landlord who prides themselves on making sure my property is safe and in good condition I do not believe I have the right to disturb my tenants peace and enjoyment of their home, but in order to keep our home safe and secure for my tenants I make sure their pest control is done yearly include termite control etc and any maintance issue is attended to immediately if possible but as our property is remote it is not always easy to get trades to attend. I believe tenants should not have to have a landlord or property manager enter their house when no one is home if this should happen on a planned inspection all I ask of my tenant is to let my property manager know and it can be rescheduled to more suitable time.maybe good old fashioned respect from both sides may be all that is required. :-)
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    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      You are a great example for other property investors to follow. Lucky tenants!
      Hide reply (1)
      • Over it about 2 months ago
        Thank you for your kind words we are inexperienced landlords but renting ourselves most of our lives I did not enjoy having no privacy or pets if not for first home grant we would still be renting.
    • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
      I want to rent from you!
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      • Over it about 2 months ago
        If you want redlands on a beautiful island next year Feb avail but my cottage is small quaint so only designed for couple but small pets large pets all welcome inside with their mums and dads fur babies are here on earth to be pampered.
        Hide Replies (3)
        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          I would love to live there but unfortunately I live on the Sunshine Coast and its too far away for me. A small cottage sounds perfect! there's only me. However, I would like to consider it even if it means moving so far away.
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          • Over it about 2 months ago
            IIts up for rent end of Jan and sounds like you are not enjoying where you live house is priced at only $265 a week :-) I have only one not neg rental issue no drugs meth is not tolerated it is dangerous to tenants and myself and our fur babies and this I will evict and call police for, I want my home protected and there is no compromise on this, I make sure all new tenants know I will test, some think I am hard but poisoning is not on my bucket list nor should it be yours. PS my agent Terri and Michelle are amazing they do not disrespect my tenants and i do find some of this forums comments really offensive not all landlords or managers are treat out tenants second class, safe clean and well maintained house for my tenants is my highest priority.
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            • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
              Dear Over it,It sounds perfect but after discussing it with my family it really is too far away. You are right when you say I'm not enjoying it. I have been here four years and have been happy until this property group took over the management, since then it has been intolerable. As for your property, I don't blame you not wanting drug addicts living there. It's not only the damage to the property to be considered but the dangerous elements they attract, including drug dealers and people buying drugs. I myself don't even so much as smoke cigarettes and only have the occasional drink at birthdays and other celebrations so you would never have to worry about that. I also live alone so I appreciate a safe environment free from criminal activities. I hope you find an excellent tenant who looks after your property and one you can have a mutually respectful relationship.
    • MumALLBoys about 2 months ago
      here should be more landlords like you. we have 3 monthly inspection, regardless pf school holidays, work, etc... too bad for us.....nothing ever changes, except that any problems in our property just takes months and months to be fixed, some never fixed since weve loved here
  • bartj about 2 months ago
    I voted in the poll that notice for non-urgent matters should be 7 days, however I'd qualify that I think there should be room for negotiation. Trades can be hard to organise for specific dates and times, but there needs to be some clear guidelines, so tenants know what rights they have and agents know their limits. As a tenant, I've appreciated when I have an agent who is willing to negotiate on day/time for entry - as I've never liked the idea of anyone being in my home when I'm not there, so I'm much more accommodating when there is some mutual respect shown. When it comes to tradesmen, notice from the agent that a trade is required, and details for me to contact them or that they will contact to arrange times, has worked as an effective system for me in the past, but the current regulation, leaves that up to the conduct of the agent, which is inadequate.
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    • Van about 2 months ago
      Again, I find myself agreeing with you, bartj! I think "negotiation" is the key concept here. My experience as a renter has been that many agents - even the good ones - are extremely reluctant to engage in negotiation of any kind. With some exceptions I have basically been told from on high how it's going to be. I think it contributes to the bad feeling tenants have for agents. If agents treated renters like competent, responsible adults, I think renters would be much more willing to be accommodating.
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      • ChristineA about 2 months ago
        I agree that negotiation is paramount. Its a shame that there can't be more of it. Maybe we as Agents (and I hope we don't) come across as non-negotiable simply due to the volume of properties that have to be managed. Regrettably, tradies for us too can be hard to come by and are not sitting about waiting for us to call. We ask that they contact the tenants to work out a mutually convenient time. We do this out of respect for our tenants. a- it is their home, b- they could be shiftworkers, be ill or have a tiny baby that makes a change to their routine. We ask also that if they haven't spoken to the tradie in a reasonable time, that they contact the tradie.What do home owners do? They make arrangements to be home during the day - just like any resident must.
      • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
        Bartj and Van I agree with what you are both saying about negotiation however, my latest experience has shown me that not all agents are willing to negotiate or respect tenants rights and privacy. I truly believe that whilst negotiation is the key and the preferred method for dealing with issues of entry there should be consistency across the board on how property managers behave. For example, my daughter is renting in Brisbane and the owner is selling the property, she has arranged with the owner and the property manager for an open inspection once a fortnight on a Saturday as both she and her partner work long hours. A friend on mine who has been in his property for four years has negotiated six monthly inspections as the property manager and owner both know he looks after the property. On this forum there are owners and other tenants who also state positive solutions regarding entry etc. Unfortunately this is not the case for a lot of us and we are not given the luxury of negotiation just told this is how it is. This is why I think guidelines, regulations etc should change so that it is fair for everyone and property managers are made to be consistent and follow the examples of considerate reasonable managers and owners who listen to the needs of tenants and work towards solutions that benefit everyone.
  • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
    I'm not sure what others think but I recently received my renewal tenancy agreement for a property I have been renting for over 4 years. The property manager had added in an approval for a pet cat without my knowledge or consent. ( I don't own a cat, I'm highly allergic to them). However, there is an abandoned cat that lives in the yard. The previous tenant left it behind. If I sign this agreement that makes me responsible for the animal and subject to the terms and conditions of keeping a pet in a rented property. One of those conditions is a cat must be kept inside the property at night. Given my allergies that is ridiculous, I don't feed the animal but I have under compassionate grounds provided a small kennel for shelter. Is it legal for them to add in items on the tenancy agreement without my knowledge or consent?
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    • Van about 2 months ago
      That sounds weird and is a very good reminder for everyone to reread all the documents when renewing a tenancy to ensure nothing has been amended. Before signing it I would contact the Residential Tenancies Authority and/or Tenants Queensland for advice. I'd also contact the real estate agent and ask why they've added that clause. I'm not sure who's actually responsible for an abandoned animal on a rental property, but it's almost certainly not you.
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      • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
        Thank you! I did contact the agent and her response was that it was put there in case another property manager potentially breached me for the animal living in the yard. However theta has been there for 4 years, the owner knows about it and all the property managers know as well. I see this as a direct ploy to make me responsible for the animal. Especially when it wasn't discussed with me first.
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        • Sanch about 2 months ago
          Not certain why you dont call your Council , declare it is an abandoned animal and have them come and get it and deal with it. It is not , nor should it be seen, as your responsibility. If Council unwilling, call RSPCA.Again, appalling behaviour by Property Managers.
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          • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
            You're right I could ring the council or the RSPCA, but it's an old cat. As he wasn't hurting anyone (not even the wild life) I tolerated him in my yard thinking he could spend the rest of his days there. It was bad enough and confusing that his owner had just left him. The neighbour feeds him and would have taken him but her little dog won't stand for it, consequently he lives in the yard when he is around. I guess I didn't want to be responsible for a living creature to be put down for no other reason except he had no where else to go. I wasn't brought up that way, life is precious even if it is a cranky old cat who has no idea he is causing such a problem for a property manager.
            Hide reply (1)
            • Sanch about 2 months ago
              Removed by moderator.
    • Angela Ballard about 2 months ago
      Its not your cat, so you have no responsibility. Permission or approval does not mean you are taking up the offer of approval
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      • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
        Thank you Angela, it is quite worrying when you find something has been added without your knowledge. I receive my lease renewal form electronically and sometimes it is tempting to just sign it and send it back. I don't think I will be tempted again though!
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        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          Have heard back from Qld Tenants and the advice was because I "allowed " the cat to remain on the property it can be considered my cat and I can be breached for not having an approval for it. As for them adding it to the lease without my knowledge, you guessed it! My fault again, it's up to me to thoroughly read any document before signing it. For those people who have trouble with literacy this makes them especially vulnerable given that they trust the agent. As it stands now I have been advised to contact RSPCA or an animal refuge and have the animal removed, once again I'm left with the responsibility of cleaning up someone else's mess. The previous tenant was notified by the previous agent to come and get her cat but this has never been followed up and now consequently it has been made my problem.
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          • homelesswithpets about 2 months ago
            Unhappy renter I am glad you have compassion for this cat but PLEASE contact a refuge (preferably one with a no euthanasia policy) to collect the cat (explain that due to your allergies you are unable to bring it to them yourself). Or perhaps your neighbour could surrender it for you. The poor thing, being old, could very well be suffering from illness (even something like arthritis can be very debilitating for an older animal) and would definately have a better life in a refuge until it is rehomed.
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            • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
              Sorry for the late reply homelesswithpets, I have spoken to the neighbour about him and your concerns about his health. She assures me he is in good health and he is probably only about six or seven years old. Being allergic to cats I've never really taken an interest in their ages, and perhaps because he was already an adult cat when I moved in four years ago I assumed he was older than he really is. The real problem is he has become the community cat, it isn't just my yard he resides in. According to her he does the rounds and lives and sleeps in several gardens in our neighbourhood. Across the road he sleeps on their pingpong table, next door to me he sleeps on their porch, the neighbour over the back of my place has put our a chair for his exclusive use and my neighbour who feeds him has a bed made up in the shed (where the dog can't reach him) so that where there is a storm he has a dry place to go. Apparently there are at least three other places he "hangs his hat" besides the ones mentioned. However, my neighbour who feeds him has decided she is going to take him, not sure how it will work out with the dog but she is adamant he should be allowed to remain in an area he considers his patch. My son brought up an interesting thought though, for four years I have lived here and the cat has never been a secret. The owner knows about him and even told me his own mother has had a similar experience and is now looking after an abandoned cat. The property managers have been doing quarterly inspections for four years, the cat has never been an issue and they have always been well aware of his existence and the arrangement with the neighbour to feed him. One has to wonder why now they have decided to behave like it's a new thing.
  • Alice Husband 2 months ago
    We lived in a rental property where the owner would just come around to the house whenever she wanted. There was nothing we could do unless we wanted to issue a notice of breach. There doesn't seem to be much point in creating extra rules for property owners unless there is some incentive to comply with them.
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    • GeeGee 2 months ago
      Is there any reason you didn't issue a Notice to Breach? It's there for you to use. It's a simple process.
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      • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
        It may be a simple process but tenants well understand that breaching agents or owners can and often does end in retaliatory behaviours that are so difficult and time intensive to prove. Power can be nasty in asserting itself. So, the tenants lose out either way, and the proprietary interests in the system carry on... as they like.
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        • GeeGee 2 months ago
          What I am hearing on this forum are tenants complaining about landlords and landlords complaining about tenants. The loathing for each other is disappointing especially when both brilliant tenants and landlords exist. Matching them is the key. Tenants have a right to a decent landlord and landlords have a right to a decent tenant. The bottom line is that no matter what laws are in place either side will break them if they are either a "bad tenant" or a "bad landlord". Just for the reason you stated above you don't exercise your rights for fear of reprisal and landlords are also in danger of tenants destroying their property when issuing a Notice to Remedy Breach. When a tenant stopped paying us rent after three weeks of moving in we were in all sorts of trouble. We found out there were drug deals being carried out on the property. We followed all due process which took weeks and the night before we were due to go to court (the prep took hours and hours of work) he left. He physically threatened us so much so that we were afraid to list him as a bad tenant for fear of our safety. So now he goes on to dupe some unsuspecting landlord. You can have all the laws in place to protect both sides but when you get a bad apple (either landlord or tenant) you'll find that one side will follow the law and one won't. The repercussions for the ones who don't are minimal to none.
    • Fc35 about 2 months ago
      You would have been well within your rights to breach the landlord.
  • Corey8888 2 months ago
    I think that initial 3 monthly inspections for the first two is fine. After that it should be reduce to 2 a year. Every 3 months is so invasive and it actually causes me a heck of a lot of anxiety. It makes me feel like my life is on show and when pictures are being taken, it makes me feel even more uncomfortable. I pay money to live here, I don’t feel like my house should be a circus show.
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    • Van 2 months ago
      I have exactly this reaction to quarterly inspections. I can't be home during the inspection because I hate seeing a stranger poking around my private space.I agree that inspections should be reduced once a tenant proves to be reliable and clean. The first six months could be quarterly, then every six months.
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      • Fc35 about 2 months ago
        I agree, the thing is in the management agreement between the agent & owner it specify's how many inspections are conducted each year, if the agent doesn't complete all of them they are in breach of their agreement with their client. It would be good if the forms could simply allow for a maximum and leave it at that.
  • Brianna Egan 2 months ago
    The current legislation is sufficient in its current form as there is already strict rules around accessing the property and time frames.
    Hide Replies (5)
    • Cathe_78 2 months ago
      Now, if only those rules were actually enforced...
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      • Darcie 2 months ago
        If a tenant felt entry was in breach of rules they can lodge complaint with RTA.
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        • Allyoz 2 months ago
          Yes, they can, however, I, as a tenant, am trying to keep a good relationship with the agent and landlord and get the distinct impressions that I am already being troublesome and difficult even though most of the damaged items in the property we've had to deal with ourselves. At the last inspection, after I politely suggested that the agent complies with entry procedures and sends an entry notice, she was visibly impatient; rolling eyes, walking away, slamming the door on exit.
      • Fc35 about 2 months ago
        They are, a Townsville agent was heavily fined for illegal entry. If you make a complaint about illegal entry to the proper authorities they will investigate.
    • Tammy N 2 months ago
      My issue is the lack of flexibility. I do not believe that the property manager or real estate agent should be allowed to entre if you are not home if you are able to arrange a time when you can be home. Or arrange someone to be there on your behalf.
  • Morto about 2 months ago
    As a landlord, if you look after your tenants they will work with you. Tenants rights must be respected along with that of the Landlord. 48 hours to a week should be enough to gain access. Sometimes tenants can't get there so work with them. s landlords we must see passed the untidiness when we inspect. Tenants have lives too and sometimes it's tough to keep up with day to day chores. Damage is a different thing and if owned up to quickly can solve a lot of issues coming forward.
  • cantab about 2 months ago
    most of the problems would be solved by less power to property managers and more agreement with tenants, as it stands many Tenants won't stand up to the PM's because of treats to list them with the likes of ticker which will stop them getting another rental, good Tenants need to be included in planning when things go wrong. And bad Tenants need to have more common sense laws brought to bear on them before they can do more damage.
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    • Mikaelas93 about 2 months ago
      Removed by moderator.
  • 22QLD about 2 months ago
    I have been in the current rental for 8+years and it has only been the last 1-1.5 years I have had issues with the real estate. The first was when they did not turn up to a scheduled inspection and then placed the blame on me for them not turning up. They began taking pictures of the rooms during the inspection without notification and when I complained that it was a breach of privacy, they stated that it was part of their policy to use for reviewing the condition of the walls/floors. Inspections have increased from 6mth inspections to 3mth inspections. In addition, previously I was able to reschedule the inspections to the afternoon so I can be available for the inspections but now have been advised all inspections will be carried out between 9-11am. There is a lack of communication and privacy for tenants. I think 6 monthly inspections with contact in between to discuss maintenance issues is reasonable
  • Me ST 2 months ago
    If the minimum notice periods with a level of flexibility are followed than the current practice is good.
    Hide Replies (13)
    • Cathe_78 2 months ago
      It might help if there were penalties for real estate agents who didn't follow the rules.
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      • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
        Yes, there's no easy way for tenants to breach (and for that to be meaningful) without potential serious consequences for the tenants - moved on, etc etc the system and compliance is quite unbalanced with bigger consequences for tenants than for owners or agents
      • T17 2 months ago
        There are severe penalties that agents can incur if they do not follow the rules. All agents should know this. A minimum of 7 days notice is given to tenants for a routine inspection. Ample time in my opinion to have cleaned/tidied if house is not up to the usual standard.
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        • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
          Inspections are not about tenants housekeeping! The RTA says this but perhaps not in a well targeted way. Focus on property and maintenance needs, not your own idea of a cleaned house to god knows whose standard. Agents need better training around this - and its this sort of attitude and behaviour on the part of agents and owners that upsets renters the most. 10 % of the 230+ rental narratives collected mention this. And in tight rental markets renters sense of security is highly challenged by agents that threaten a breach for a cobweb in a corner. I kid you not. This is about peoples sense of safety, security, home and the need for a sense of continuity and non interference in the most basic of things - shelter and a home/life.As for following the rules, there's very little capacity to ensure agents compliance, though I did collect one tale from a fella who took various agents to QCAT on 7 different occasions and won every single time. But how many have the wherewithal for that kind of effort to keep bad agent behaviour in check?
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          • Cathe_78 2 months ago
            I've been sent breach notices over housekeeping matters. I try to tidy up before an inspection (if the notice actually arrives before the inspection is due) but I tidy it to "having guests over" standard, not "end of the lease and moving out standard" (i.e., I didn't wash down the window screens or take the dead bugs out of the light fixtures). The agent was exceedingly rude to me in person about the standard of my housekeeping (because it's not like I'm working full time and still living here or anything...) and sent a follow up email (which arrived much more speedily than the letter of notification did) with a long list of the cleaning she wanted me to do before the re-inspection, as well as a breach notice, and a fine for the privilege.
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            • Darcie 2 months ago
              As a private landlord, I have complained to my partner about the inspection intent amongst agents. While I have tenants who clean for each inspection now, my past tenant never did special cleaning and I just told her “as long as it is clean when you move out”. It is nice to have a tenant that keeps things clean... but a clean and tidy house on inspection is no reflection of their day to day living. I rang an agent once for a rental check on an applicant and she told me they didn’t kept it particularly clean, that they left dirty washing out. !!! Of course they did, they live there :O
              Hide Replies (3)
              • Van 2 months ago
                I like your attitude and I wish all agents were like this. I have had agents make the most ridiculous complaints after inspections. I think the complaint about having two weeds in the front garden - a garden that wasn't even my responsibility to maintain - was probably the most amusing. I have heard of worse examples, including a complaint about leaving laundry out and leaving a smudge on a light switch.What do they want? For people to pretend they don't live there?
              • bartj about 2 months ago
                I wish it weren't so Darcie, but I think you're a rare breed - who still consider tenants to be human.
              • Sanch about 2 months ago
                Again reinforcing why I will NOT use an Agent for my one and only, very ordinary Mums and Dads rental property.
            • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
              That email the agent sent you should be evidence enough for you to breach them! Unfortunately this is a common story that clearly shows the power imbalance in the system. I feel lucky and relieved to to have to be subjected to such treatment
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              • bartj about 2 months ago
                I agree with you Angela, but in reality most people avoid conflict with their agents - they can be a spiteful bunch after all.
        • Cathe_78 2 months ago
          I particularly love the letters that are dated for seven days before an inspection ... but which, for some mysterious reason, arrive two days AFTER the actual inspection.
        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          There are many ways around "the rules" and agents know every loop hole and trick in the book. They actually use the law to justify their actions. I also agree with Angela, it is not about a tidy house, although I keep a clean house myself I do not judge how others live. If they are not damaging the property and paying the rent on time that should be what agents concern themselves with. I wonder if every single agent has a weed free garden and show home standard property that they live in?
  • Sanch 2 months ago
    I ma an owner, and for all of these reasons, wont use an agent. My exoerience, both as a tenant, and owner. Is that agents have no respect for either.I have great respect for my tenants and would not do anything to compromise their right to live in their home comfortably.We never crash their privacy and always attend promptly to repairs. We therefore have great and happy tenants, and we are very happy Landlords.
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    • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
      If only there were more owners like you Sanch. Perhaps being on the other side as a tenant has made you aware of how unfair the balance of power is. I am personally not interested in power plays, I only want to live a quiet life happy in the knowledge I'm considered a valued tenant. The agency who has taken over in the last year has made that impossible with numerous intrusions on my privacy, threats and bullying. I have a good property owner too and he has sorted out most of these issues, but they continue to harass (they like to win) and I'm loathe to contact him every five minutes to complain about them. It has been useless to complain to the RTA or Qstars as they always make sure they are one step inside the law. I now feel that I'm considered a troublemaker by these organisations as I don't have the gift of the gab like these agents do. I feel like I'm being ground into the dirt and have no choice but to leave and find another place to rent, even though I had been happy here for 4 years with no issues of the previous agent and no need to continually contact the owner. At 64 years old I shouldn't have to be put in this position.
    • BronwynJ about 2 months ago
      I agree Sanch that there are agents out there that do the wrong thing. I think professional standards in the industry need to be lifted. However, there are plenty of agents who do the right thing as well. What is needed is a better enforcement of the rules to ensure all property managers are obeying the laws.
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      • Sanch about 2 months ago
        Bronwyn J, I moved to SE Qld some years ago aged in my mid 50's. I rented a house in Petrie Tce from a very reputable Agent who treated me like an absolute Moron. I was seated alone in a room and forced to watch an excruciating Video on 'How to live in your Rental Property as a good Tenant'.,The Owner of the Property and his GIRLFRIEND made regular appearances at the House, in order to attend to 'This or That' whenever they felt like it. She would stand in the doorway and give patronisng looks at my things. I moved out after 3 months, bought a place and then another, and life moves forward.At no stage EVER did that Agency approach me about purchasing a Property, there being an ( incorrect) assumption that as a Renter I was Scum, and would therefore not ever be in a situation where I may buy.I was left with a very bad taste in my mouth about Rental Property Managers in SE Qld, and in the intervening 12 years, little has been done to change that opinion.I am not sure from where these attitudes come, I know there are some awful Landlords. I rented from one who was as good as his Agent. Awful.
        Hide reply (1)
        • BronwynJ about 2 months ago
          I am sorry you have had this experience with agents, we are not all the same. Agents not doing the right thing should be taken to task by the RTA or the Office of fair trading.
  • heyemilyhay 2 months ago
    I've never had a bad inspection experience in QLD - property managers have been friendly and respectful. I did have a terrible experience with a landlord who barged in on me in my underwear once in NZ - he had not given us an entry notice, and let himself in when I ignored his knocks (I was unwell and not expecting anyone!)
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    • homelesswithpets 2 months ago
      OMG heyemilyhay 😱 I feel for you, that’s absolutely disgusting behaviour by that NZ landlord. It does highlight however the fact that these owners don’t respect their tenants at all and see them as nothing more than walking, talking dollar signs
    • GeeGee 2 months ago
      It's nice to hear that you only had one bad experience and that others were friendly and respectful.
    • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
      well aren't you the lucky one! Most of us have had at least one bad experience from property manager who seem to think they are a class above tenants.
      Hide reply (1)
      • heyemilyhay about 2 months ago
        Yeah, I am so grateful! There are some absolute nightmares out there - we've been really lucky.
  • AnneN 2 months ago
    In our last rental property at our end of lease term, we had our rental agency provide an entry notice to us for them to view the house to prospective tenants. We tried to negotiate with them as it was on the same day that we were moving out, the removal company was going to be there and the place was a mess. We later found out it was advertised as an open house viewing and that multiple people would be going through the property. I then rang the RTA and they advised that "as per the RTA guidelines an "Open House Viewing is only acceptable with written agreement from the tenants". We advised our Rental Agency that we did not agree to them opening the house up for inspection to multiple viewers. There response was this: We are aware of the legislation and if any tenant is not happy with the an open showing, we escort people individually as a private inspection. The time is on the internet so we can have the groups arrive at one time, rather than issuing you with many entry notices for multiple throughout the vacating process. I then got in contact with the customer service at the head of the Agency and they advised me of the following: "as you are outside the guidelines of the RTA you do not have the right to enter the property with multiple prospective tenants as this is still an Open House Viewing even when showing the property one tenant at a time".I also spoke to the RTA again regarding their comment and they advised the following: I have been in contact with the RTA again, and they have confirmed that even if you attempt to show multiple prospective tenants through as a private inspection, as they will have all arrived at the same time and will be waiting outside, according to the RTA this is still classed as an "Open House Viewing". We stuck a breach of notice on the door that day and I have it in writing that they still went ahead with entering the property and showing multiple people through, this whole conversation was through email so I have it in writing that this agency does not respect your privacy and does not respect the RTA guidelines when it comes to entry practices.From this experience, most real estate rental agencies feel that they have the right to enter the property whenever they feel like it, even if it goes against the RTA guidelines and the tenants written permission. Note: This was a highly popular rental agency, and given this experience, I will never rent with this agency again. I feel that there needs to be stricter guidelines when allowing access to your property as a renter, as it currently feels like you have no rights and the real estate will just go ahead and do what they please.
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    • Cathe_78 2 months ago
      And that's before you even get to the property owners. In one place I rented, I wondered if I was going insane for a while because, every week or so, I'd come home to find something changed or moved in the garden. Now, I was paying a mowing company to keep the grass tidy and was trying my best to keep up with the weeding and watering myself. What I didn't realise was that the owners lived in the same street - and that they felt entitled to fiddle about in the garden whenever they wanted (this was eventually confirmed to me via a phone call, but the owners never went into the garden when I was actually home – they always waited for when I went out). I don't THINK they did anything inside the house, but I was always a little on edge (and keeping half an eye out for changes inside the house as well).
      Hide reply (1)
      • AnneN 2 months ago
        WOW Cathe - This is beyond wrong - Definitely a disrespect of privacy laws.
    • Allyoz 2 months ago
      We experienced exactly the same at our last rental property although, being new to renting I didn't know about the rules and that I could get advice from the RTA about my position. So, I complained strongly to the showing agent while people were walking through my home. Oh, and did they retaliate to that! Trying to hold bond over a crack in the tiles the size less than a five cent piece, which I proved was not visible on entry (luckily I'd noted the filthy tiles) as I had obviously cleaned the dirt out of the already existing mark. Oh dear, the RTA were great with helping me with that horrible experience. The real estate agent was on the phone, shouting and threatening. What an awful experience! We left the place in such great condition, better than entry, that it was being rented a week later.
      Hide reply (1)
      • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
        My experience with the RTA is that no matter what they say the agent or owner will still do what they like. What's the point of having guidelines etc, if these people can just ignore them and do what they want anyway?
  • Bel about 2 months ago
    : I think if tenants were treated with genuine respect then entry wouldn't be an issue. I don't trust land agents at all...they warrant very little trust for ethics or integrity IMHO as their priority appears to be what they can get from the tenants be it money or a sense of power over...so if someone wanted to come in for something (and I have in the past allowed this) with very little notice, (in my mind its even better than an inspection in that it is how it is...no one stressed to clean everything as though the blooming queen mother is arriving ... surely wether my bed is made or I have put the dishes away is unimportant but wrecking walls or trashing doors is important)...then I am ok with it but I have been caught with complaints that something wasn't tidy enough... In my experience this power hungry )^% of making tenants feel like they are low beings because some landagent with a power kick thinks they can judge you on your housework skills yet ignore serious issues you as a tenant may be having is ridiculously frustrating and why tenants want lots of time ... I have had a few traumas with this in some rentals I feel very strong about it
  • Bel about 2 months ago
    Removed by moderator.
  • Over it about 2 months ago
    Recently a good friend with a longterm rental tenant took up smoking drugs their house had to be cleaned it took over week all soft furnishing carpets and even part of walls had to be removed I understand 3 months is annoying for tenants but this was devastating for my friends they also trusted this tenant after so many years.I am a fair landlord who does believe in tenants rights however I will not tolerate my home being made unsafe for my future tenants.
  • Over it about 2 months ago
    My main concern about my home that is rented out is not pets as I love fur babies but tenants who have a meth drug habit no one wants to have a toxic environment for future tenants and clean up costs are massive and scary to handle as a owner, drugs in a rental property is unfortunately not even discussed in this forum we are all so worried about entry to properties, pets and good and bad tenants no one has even hit on the issue of keeping our rental properties safe for our future tenants. People who smoke or cook meth are yes humans beings that need help but at what cost to innocent future tenants or landlords, but I do not want my home ruined and becoming toxic, one thing a friend that is a property manager told me was small minority of good tenants can be great for a long time then take up smoke meth drug and it is a downhill slide it is truly sad but destructive for owners.If not for this issue for me I would only do a property check once a year for a long term tenant.This is a hidden discussion not mentioned by anyone in future rental tenant rights.All tenants have the right to a toxic free environment and I intend to excess my rights as a owner to protect my future tenants by not allow meth to be smoked in my home.
  • MarieC about 2 months ago
    In general, tenants are treated like inferior citizens in the rental market in Queensland and in other states. I have been a renter my whole life (including my parents being renters in childhood). I am now aged 56, so have lots of experience of many kinds in the rental market, and expect to be a renter for the rest of my life.My view of the current situation with regards entry to rental properties is that a tenant's 'quiet enjoyment' of the property (for which they pay ever increasing rental prices), is mostly respected very little by owners and agents, or the current law. For example, wherever possible I try to be a long term tenant (presuming the owner doesn't sell, which has happened increasingly over the decades as the property market has become more and more investment oriented). I have a very good record with cleanliness and care of properties. But, even after years and years of being in a place, with all inspections coming up A-OK, I routinely have to endure inspections every three months. This is essentially an ongoing money making activity for agents, for which owners also bear the cost. I think routine inspections should start at every six months, then become every year after the first year or two with no problems. At some point in a long tenancy, and where there have been no problems with a tenant's care of the property, there should be no further need for inspections at all, as the tenant is quite capable of letting an agent or owner know if there are maintenance issues.I also think a rental property should be vacated before prospective renters are allowed in to view the property. Having hoardes of strangers wandering through your home is the absolute opposite of 'quiet enjoyment'. It also happens at a time of stress, great expense and upheaval for a tenant. Why should the continuity of rental income for an owner be given such high priority over a tenant's rights to have peace in the property they are paying for? As it stands, we are paying rent and having the space we are paying for invaded as well.In terms of non-urgent entry to the property, I can't see any real need for the notice to be less than a week, and I think the grounds for entry should have to be very pressing or else not happen at all without the tenant's agreement. In general, I think agents/owners should leave a tenant in peace in the property they pay for to be their home.
  • Steve g 2 months ago
    Entry needs to be more often to check on maintenance issues etc
    Hide Replies (8)
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      if a place is properly maintained to minimum standards then why would there be cause for more inspections?
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      • Pam4 2 months ago
        In order to properly maintain the owner or manager needs to enter to see what needs to be done. Which comes first, the chicken or the egg.
        Hide Replies (4)
        • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
          Pam, that can be done annually. Better to establish relationships with tenants and have the attitude that the place is their home...and simply your investment. A number of research stories I collected talked about how grateful they as renters were to have property owners who had their renters interests at heart and that they reciprocated by taking good care and doing what maintenance they could themselves. the system as constituted sets up tenants against the other vested interests and this itself causes much friction between parties. Owners and agents recognising that a place is home to renters goes a long way to engendering respect, all round
          Hide Replies (3)
          • JaniceAC 2 months ago
            A lot of tenants consider the rental their home to treat as they see fit and this is not always in a respectful manner. It is someone’s else’s property and should be treated with respect.
            Hide Replies (2)
            • DanPAU 2 months ago
              And a lot don't, I'm sure the their are more good than bad or the rental system wouldn't be profitable...soooo treating everyone with jaded distrust would not seem to be very reasonable, sure vigilance but a need to remain professional...perhaps respond with an open mind and accept that tenants being defensive isn't an act of criminality or diversion to hide malicious damage but an attempt to maintain some sense of control over their home...I have met some great realtors and some that judge of the bat and I have met some that are utterly jaded and hJudgemental with out reason in the circumstance...
            • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
              Please do not generalise all tenants in this manner. Clearly your comments already reflect your attitude to tenants and your lack of respect. Is it any wonder property managers such as yourself are despised? If you want respect learn to give it!
    • Van 2 months ago
      More often than every three months?
    • bartj about 2 months ago
      Can you clarify that Steve?
  • Van 2 months ago
    I am a tenant. My agent has recently taken to sending me a copy of the routine inspection report. It's quite eye-opening. The disclaimer at the beginning specifically states that the report is visual only, carried out to assess the way the tenant is maintaining the property. The disclaimer then goes on to stipulate that the property manager is not qualified to assess structural aspects.Based on that, it would be unwise for landlords to assume the managing agent can alert you to major problems. They're real estate agents, not qualified architects or builders. They can pick up obvious problems, as anyone could, but it's doubtful that agents would have the expertise to pick up anything else. These quarterly inspections are primarily about checking up on the tenant. I think that once you've proved yourself to be a clean and reliable tenant, inspections should reduce in frequency. Quarterly is invasive and reminds me, yet again, that it's not really my home.
    Hide Replies (7)
    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      The agent is quite correct in their disclaimer. They are not qualified building inspectors and will only comment on obvious visual items. A building inspector would probably take 2-4 hours to inspect an average 3 brm home. Owner costs would escalate and a tenant would complain at the length of time they were present for this inspection.
      Hide Replies (4)
      • Van 2 months ago
        I agree that they are correct with the disclaimer, however a lot of people on this thread seem to think that the routine inspections performed by agents are about maintenance. My point is that apart from problems that are visually obvious, no agent is going to be able to pick up on all maintenance issues. The purpose of these inspections must therefore be to check up on the tenant.As a tenant, I can't comment on how I'd feel about the costs of a building inspection, however I wouldn't object to some kind of professional building inspection being carried out every so often. It would benefit me, as I want to live in a safe place - and it should be the right of every tenant to live in a safe place. It wouldn't have to be done as often as agent inspections. I'm not sure what the recommended timeframe would be, but maybe every two years? I'd consider that reasonable.
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        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          Not everyone can afford to have a building inspection carried out. If the property is so poorly maintained then it is the responsibility of the property manager to inform the owner a building inspection needs to be done. It's hardly reasonable to put yet another cost on the tenant when the tenant has no say whatsoever as to when and if any maintenance is done.
          Hide reply (1)
          • Van about 2 months ago
            Just to clarify, I wasn't saying that a building inspection should be paid for by the tenant. That would be at the owner's expense. I was responding to Janice's comment that tenants would be unwilling to allow building inspectors in for two to four hours. I was saying that if building inspections were to happen, I would be open to the idea if it was done every two years or less.
      • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
        I was always lead to believe that the inspections were about ensuring the tenant is not damaging the property and to provide them with an opportunity to report any maintenance issues. I agree with Lildei nothing gets done from one inspection to the next. They come, take their photos and leave. Three months later they repeat the process. Nobody expects them to be building inspectors or architects so why then do property managers expect tenants to be building inspectors? We're supposed to know when things aren't right and need fixing, some people do but many young people who are inexperienced in life do not and they are criticised for something you have just admitted property managers are not.
    • bartj about 2 months ago
      My understanding of maintenance inspections, has always been that they're intended for the agent to inspect the property for maintenance issues, not simply that it is being maintained by the tenant - this means that it's as much for the tenant to discuss maintenance issues, as it is for the agent to inspect them. This seems like an area that needs clarification to me, although it probably seems like a trivial distinction. Once again, this is an area that is treated dramatically different, by different agents; I've had friends who have been told by an agent that they need to re-clean an oven, re-mop floors, etc. because they're not pristine for an inspection - to me this unacceptable, it is not a cleanliness inspection. Of course, if there are cleanliness issues that will lead to permanent damage, like rotting carpets or moldy ceilings, then this would be acceptable to address. I've personally had an agent insist that it's my responsibility to clean gutters and prune overhanging tree branches on maintenance inspections - in this case, where the gutters were full and trees overgrown at the beginning of our lease. There needs to be more clarity for agents and tenants about their areas of responsibility.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Van about 2 months ago
        I'd agree with the need for clarity about what we're all responsible for, bartj. After reading a lot of these comments on these discussion threads I think a lack of communication (between agents and tenants, between tenants and owners and between agents and owners) is causing a lot of problems. As is the vagueness of the Act in regards to a lot of common scenarios encountered by agents, owners and tenants.
  • Van about 2 months ago
    I see a lot of agents and owners on this thread who have clearly been burned by bad tenants and are therefore reluctant to inspect properties less often. I know that you must see some absolutely terrible examples of human behaviour. But tenants are not all like that. My guess is the majority of us are at least good tenants. Yet we are all treated as if we are going to trash the property at any moment. It's a kind of stereotyping and prejudice, and a lot of what rubs me up the wrong way about being a renter. I pay my rent on time and look after the property I rent. I have often been complimented for leaving the property in better condition than when I arrived. However, I am still inspected by a stranger every three months, often at a time and/or a date that's not convenient for me, with no power to reschedule. These inspections cause me a lot of anxiety. I have to ask for permission to have pets or hang pictures and certificates up on the wall. When I have lived in properties that go up for sale, I am treated as if I am a nuisance or don't exist.When I try so hard to be a responsible tenant, yet get treated like I'm not, I am discouraged and slightly humiliated. If I feel like I have no control over where I live, it doesn't feel like a home. I feel like I'm putting all this effort in and getting nothing back. The system should recognise good tenants, acknowledge that the property they rent is their home and ensure that all renters are treated with respect.We're all dependent on each other. You provide us housing. You need us to pay the rent and look after the property. If we feel like we can make the place our own, we are more likely to consider it a home rather than a roof over our heads. Happy renters who live in a home and feel respected are more likely to look after your property. (Long-term tenancies will also make a place feel more like home, but I'm already straying off topic so I'll leave it there.)
  • Pam4 2 months ago
    Owners need to be able to inspect often enough to pick up on routine and preventative maintenance. Tenants do not always report maintenance or may not notice things like leaf build up in gutters, loose glass in old houses, as a property manager I found damp carpet in a units bedroom. There was a leak coming through the wall from the shower tenant hadn't noticed the dampness at all . Carpet was able to be salvaged but if it had been left any longer it would have cost more to fix.
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    • irtapil 2 months ago
      Tenants would be more willing to report things for preventative maintenance if they got more say in when and how it got fixed, currently it's 24 hours notice and tenants get no say in it, so it makes sense that they'll only report things that inconvenience them or get urgent. A tradie coming at 24 hours notice can interrupt tenants who work from home, leave dust or other mess tenants have to clean up, or even risk damaging furniture and other stuff the tenants own.
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      • Pam4 2 months ago
        Just because someone is a tenant doesn't mean they should have absolutely no inconvenience. Stuff happens in life and we all have to deal with it.
        Hide Replies (5)
        • irtapil 2 months ago
          I'm Saying in terms of motivation to keep an eye out for potential issues. If they get some control over what happens in their home they'll point things out, they'll kept an eye out for stuff, they're more likely to be helpful if they feel respected and in control.
        • JaniceAC 2 months ago
          Even being a homeowner you have to agree to a tradesman coming when they can fit you in. If you don’t it could be weeks before they have another appointment time available
          Hide reply (1)
          • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
            The previous company responsible for maintenance etc used tradespeople who were respectful and considerate. I would always get a call from them to discuss when they could come. Sometimes this required negotiation but we always sorted it out. Since this new company took over I have had tradespeople turn up at 7:30 am without any notice and had others tramping through my yard without my knowledge or consent. When asked why they were there they were rude and stated they didn't need to get my permission as I don't own the property. The property manager defended these people and considered me a trouble maker. If tenants are treated this way do you really think they are going to stay helpful and report minor maintenance issues?
        • Van 2 months ago
          I don't think the issue is the inconvenience. When a tradie has to come and fix something in your home, there's inconvenience whether they come tomorrow or in a fortnight. For urgent problems such as water leaks or electrical faults I can completely understand the need for urgency, and I think any reasonable tenant would cooperate with something that serious. However, for less urgent problems I don't think tenants like being told "A tradie is coming in 24 hours whether you like it or not."My agent has a system I'm happy with. I report problems, they pass them on to their handyman, the handyman contacts me and we negotiate a time that suits us both. If it's a non-urgent repair that won't necessarily be in 24 hours.
          Hide reply (1)
          • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
            This is exactly how it should be and how I mourn for the days when I had a decent agent who respected my rights and considered the fact I have a life and I'm not always home.
      • GeeGee 2 months ago
        Not sure why you wouldn't prefer a problem to be fixed? Isn't it nice to rent a well maintained property. I hear so many complaints from tenants who say their landlords don't care about maintaining the property. And, it would be the same amount of inconvenience to you if it was your home and you had to call in a tradie.
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        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          Obviously you have never had to deal with being bullied by property managers and I wonder how you would feel if a tradesman turned up at your front door at 7:30 in the morning unannounced bashing the door so loud I thought the door would break. I bet you would have something to say to that tradesman's boss! Unfortunately tenants don't have that luxury and inconsiderate property managers don't care.
      • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
        Tenants report, but are often ignored.
      • Me ST 2 months ago
        I have been a landlord and am currently a tenant. I disagree that the notice period is simply 24 hours without any flexibility. Having been on both sides of the fence, I have always found the time repairs are made is always negotiated with either me and the tenant or currently between me and the managing agent.I find tenants lack of attention to maintenance issues is the problem where they do not notify the letting agent or landlord until it is too late with some things and then it needs to be repaired in a rush.
        Hide Replies (4)
        • AnneN 2 months ago
          Have you ever thought that its the actual rental agencies that leave maintenance to the last minute. We rented our last property and advised the agency when we signed the entry condition report that the oven only worked on the Grill setting, it took them 6 months to get someone to fix this issue and this only occurred after putting a breach of notice on the agency. This has also happened in multiple rental properties.
        • JaniceAC 2 months ago
          I ask my tradesmen to contact a tenant to arrange a time. If the tenant cannot or will not arrange a time then a notice is issued. Tenants not returning calls to arrange a time for maintenance happens regularly.
          Hide reply (1)
          • Van about 2 months ago
            My agent also asks the tradie to contact me, which is great. If you have tenants who don't return their calls, then in that case it's reasonable to issue a notice. However, if some agents are not giving tenants the opportunity to organise a time with the tradie to begin with, that shouldn't be happening.
        • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
          Maybe you negotiated with your tenants but that doesn't mean all property managers do. I reported a maintenance issue three times to the property manager and was completely ignored, not even an email to state they had received my emails. In the end I reported it to the property owner who fixed it the same day. He had never been told there was an issue and once he alerted them he had fixed it I received an email the next day with some story about it going into another mailbox. Funny how previous emails had never gone into that box!
      • unhappy renter about 2 months ago
        Very little of the maintenance required I have reported gets fixed. Sure anything major does but fly screens, broken and missing bathroom tiles, and any of the little jobs that make life pleasant are not. The unit I live in has so little paint left on the walls I can no longer wash them as it is down to the bare plasterboard. The property manager that comes takes photos and looks in the oven, shower recess and cupboards but makes comments about my garden needed weeding. I keep a clean house, I have improved the property since I've been here at my own cost, there was no garden when I first came here so I find her comments objectionable.
    • Lildei 2 months ago
      Wouldn’t mind the 3 monthly inspections if the property was actually maintained but that is not always the case. Often inspections are carried out, maintenance issues are noted by the property manager but nothing gets done 3 months later the whole routine is repeated with the same outcome and this can go on for years.
    • Van 2 months ago
      It is a problem if the tenant doesn't report maintenance issues - but I do wonder how many people are scared to because they think it will lead to their rent going up at the next lease renewal, or for their lease to not be renewed at all.It may also be that renters have had problems getting maintenance done in the past, so they throw up their hands and think it will be too much trouble.
  • MatthewW 2 months ago
    28 or 30 days’ notice is reasonable for agents/owners to enter a property, unless there have been credible reports of criminal damage done to the property.
    Hide Replies (5)
    • Lillian 2 months ago
      It always depends on situation
    • irtapil 2 months ago
      a week is enough notice, what would be better than four weeks notice would be having some ability to say "no" and arrange a mutually agreeable alternative day and time.
      Hide Replies (3)
      • Van 2 months ago
        A week is not enough. I'm pretty busy and sometimes I wouldn't have the time to tidy up to the "high standard" my agent expects. Fortunately, one of the things my real estate agent does right is to give at least three weeks' notice for inspections. I think it should be at least two weeks. I just wish that I could reschedule them if the time and date is inconvenient.
      • JaniceAC 2 months ago
        I have some tenants that would never try to make a mutually agreeable time. I try to work with my tenants to arrange inspections when they can be home but some Di not want to do this during work hours. 7 days notice us enough for an inspection.
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        • Van about 2 months ago
          Janice, seven days' notice for a routine inspection would be enough if some agents didn't expect us to have the place looking like a show home. From what you've said in other comments I don't think you're one of those agents. However, most renters have stories about the unreasonable nitpicking some agents engage in, complaining about things such as a smudge on a light switch, a cobweb in a corner, dirty laundry being left out or a couple of small weeds in the front garden.My agent makes a point of telling me they expect the home to be presenting to a "high standard". I have no idea what that means. My idea of a high standard is much more than I can achieve in seven days.I think it was you who said that you don't care what the tenant's living habits are as long as they're not damaging the property. That's a reasonable way to approach inspections. I do wish all agents were like that.
  • DanPAU 2 months ago
    Fire alarm check ups...yes important but they say their coming between 9-5, with agent key. Agent needs to stipulate 2 hr window but not contractors...I have no trust in contractors/whom I don't know so want to be home...have usually got to argue pretty hard with contractors booking person to affect change. Agent won't comment as they. Contract the work out....sooome their are rules that the agent knows but won't correct contract smoke alarm people...bringing it up with realter admins seams to be viewed as unimportant or unnecessary rigidity on my part....its my home..I'm a good tenant, no damage no late pays...
    Hide Replies (2)
    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      These contractors go into numerous homes each day and each home has different issues and takes different time to complete. On their site you can change your inspection appointment. Work with contractors, it makes their life and yours much easier.
      Hide reply (1)
      • DanPAU 2 months ago
        I do and am understanding of their position, however I am unwell and have significant fatigue issues so knowing when to expect visitors is important, I don't have much but care to keep what I have secure, I am certain that their would be capacity to schedule to a 2 hour window for a 5 minute window proces, respecting that school drop of and pick up is immoveable and public health appointments are Verry hard to reschedule at short notice, My health leaves me feeling quiet vulnerable, I mess up dates etc but am sincere in my efforts to support reasonable processes.They do not make it easy to reschedule on their web page, if your using an android device the page formatting is terrible and usually nesessitates me calling and having to pleed my case to an indifferent stranger that seem to have little appreciation of what a home is to a person on a pension.
  • Lft 2 months ago
    As an owner a good real estate management will enter on renewal of lease.
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    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      12 monthly lease renewal means 12 monthly inspections. Not often enough to check unreported maintenance.
  • EarlGrey 2 months ago
    It would appear that agents seem to think they can do inspections at any that's suitable to them. I always like to be present when an inspection occurs. It levels the playing field
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    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      I love doing inspectionscwith a tenant. Twice as quick and going through each room prompts them to think about maintenance items.
  • LaurenF 2 months ago
    Agents taking photos of your bedrooms and other living areas when they do an inspection is a gross disregard for privacy. This practice should be made illegal. They should only be able to take a photo of damage if any present.
    Hide Replies (3)
    • homelesswithpets 2 months ago
      Absolutely agree!!!! I’m sure they wouldn’t like it if you followed them home, took photos of their home and belongings and then proceeded to post them online (which is where some do in fact end up especially if the photos are used in ads for the property whether for sale or rent). Oh and just a side note to agents on the topic of photos for sale/rental properties; can you all take photos of the bathroom or powder room with the toilet lid closed please?! It’s so much more appealing than a pic of the toilet bowl🤮
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      • EarlGrey 2 months ago
        I'm sure there are rules about taking photos of the house interior, particularly inside cupboards etc. I'm sure agents would get antsy if you took photos inside their office cupboards. If they want to inspect our place they will be invited in while we are there, no if's no but's.
    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      I take photos of the top 1/3 and bottom 1/3 of a bedroom. Kitchens and bathrooms I include photos if cupboards.
  • Debs Mad Chook Lady 2 months ago
    Public housing do yearly inspections I think every 6 months is enough but tenets with bad histories should be inspected every 3 months.
    Hide Replies (3)
    • Lillian 2 months ago
      I agree
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      why the discrepancy between annual public inspections and private rental system?
    • JaniceAC 2 months ago
      why would you even want to rent to a tenant with bad rental history.
  • Van 2 months ago
    Another aspect to privacy that I don't think has been mentioned yet is the amount of information agents ask for in a tenancy application form. I've been asked to provide my credit card details. You don't want to give them any more than they need, but you're worried you'll have less of a chance of getting the property if you're not forthcoming. I think the legislation should spell out what agents are allowed to ask for.
  • Jenko69 2 months ago
    Landlords should be able to look at their properties within a 48 hours especially if there’s a risk of the tenants doing damage
  • Lynnykay 2 months ago
    How balanced are rights of entry and rights to privacy in Queensland rental properties?They are reasonable however, the Form 9 should be overhauled, particularly the provision where names of the parties should beremoved due to restrictions of the privacy Act, plus confidentially when showing prospective tenants and or buyers.Have you ever made changes to a rental property? No and I don’t believe as a tenant we should be able to.Do our rental laws balance protecting the rental property from damage while allowing personal touches?Yes as Sections 217 to 219 of the RTRA Act allow the tenant reasonable steps to make request in writing to the lessor to make changes to their rental investment to assist in making the property a home for the tenant.What is your experience of entry to rental properties in Queensland?There is a need to consider extra rights of entry under section 192, which include allowing building and pest inspections and pre-settlement when purchased inspections. The absence of these provisions places the lessor in a difficult position if the tenant does not allow entry under the as agreed provision’, which is not a fair way for the situation to be. The time frame should be the same as other entry time frames for sections 192 (1) (b) to (i); 24 hours’ notice.
  • Jo deegee 2 months ago
    We have a tenant that recently was making daily complaints. I asked the agent to go around and inspect and she replied that she was in the numbers of times she could go there.
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    • Cathe_78 2 months ago
      Sounds like there might be something wrong with the real estate agent. Were the complaints about the same problem each time?
  • Darcie 2 months ago
    As an private landlord, I like to inspect 3 monthly but honestly, this is mostly to keep an eye on the garden/yard and look for any maintenance I may need to do, monitoring wear and tear. I think once a tenant has been there >24months, 6 monthly is reasonable.
    Hide Replies (3)
    • Lillian 2 months ago
      I agree because tenants don't come into offices now they forget about maintenance that is required. they tell you when something is not working but that is all.
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      Why don't you simple schedule yourself in as the gardener/maintenance person and work with your tenants re inside issues? Establishing a relationship with good tenants will develop respect and care, both ways. but 'keeping an eye on' and 'monitoring' - especially if you are not following through on those maintenance issues is pointless and won't engender the care you expect from tenants. If they are great tenants and they've been there for a year and you want them to stay then leave them alone but be truly open to fixing stuff in a timely manner. Having the conversations, rather than 'an inspection' will likely change everything for the better.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Darcie 2 months ago
        Why does it matter what you call it, I’m still there to inspect the property. I’m not sure I understand your point. I had one tenant who was causing quite a bit of minor damage so needed to monitor that and keep tenant informed (she didn’t notice half the time).
  • foxje 2 months ago
    Existing legislation is adequate. 12 weekly inspections are a good balance. Pushing it out to 6 months means potential for more damage and hence would need to be accompanied by an increase in bond which would not serve the tenant.
  • .Dee 2 months ago
    My experience is of poor quality in the rentals recently, I now have 3 monthly inspections with A New Property Manager Every Time and I have been renting in my current home for 4 years. I have to have repeat conversations every 3 months about already prearranged agreements with agency and owners. However, the first rental property 12 years ago; I had the same Property Manager for 4 years, she knew my children and asked how I was going and after the first12 months with only 2 inspections, I only had 1 inspection yearly. I felt like a member of society.
  • Renting forever 2 months ago
    I’ve had no problems with formal entry requests when renting through a real estate agent. But such was the experience with a private rental that I will never rent privately again. (Would just show up and let themselves in!)My issue is owners and agents who “drive by” and pass comment on the status of the yard and property. I’ve even had comments (negative) when we had a gardener engaged (on a fortnightly basis) to keep the property appropriately manicured as it “wasn’t up to the owners standard”. Well hello! You don’t live here! It’s not YOUR home! Seriously Driving by also shouldn’t be able to be used to check up on tenants “quiet enjoyment”
    Hide Replies (4)
    • homelesswithpets 2 months ago
      Agree. Creepy too. Talk about borderline stalking. Yes owners should be, and are expected to, maintain their rentals in safe, secure and habitable conditions but that doesn’t mean they can just turn up on a whim under the guise of “a (routine or otherwise) inspection”. Tenants should always be able to have a say in inspection dates and times. And they should always be allowed to be in attendance of any such inspection.I have also been in the situation of the owner coming at all times of day and night, with no notice at all and also not giving us tenants notifications of any works that may cause damage to OUR property including getting paint overspray on our vehicles while parked in our carports. Not only is this disruptive but quite frankly rude and arrogant behaviour by the owners
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      • GeeGee 2 months ago
        I would refuse to let them in if they haven't given you appropriate notice. You are within your rights to do that.
    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      I have some pretty awful research data about such things. There should be free training for anyone keen to buy and rent and investment property to help them understand the difference between someone else's home/life and property. Drones have been used! I know of agents who have actually sacked property owners because some owners will always complain about the best of tenants - such is their sense of entitlement
    • Cathe_78 2 months ago
      I hate the ones who do that. I particularly despise the passive-aggressive emails they send me afterwards (when these same people never respond to – or even, apparently, READ – the emails I send them with maintenance requests). And I've had this experience both renting privately and through a real estate agent.
  • Lateesha 2 months ago
    We received another last-minute notice from the real estate at 4.30pm on Friday for Monday access. My husband emailed them a response back stating “Monday arvo is fine as long as he isn’t entering the house (which he shouldn’t be to fix the back stairs). If he wants to access the house, please let us know so someone can be home.”We heard nothing back from the real estate so we assumed the builder was coming on Monday just to do the back stairs as we had not given permission to do the inside work without us there. When we got home Monday afternoon, the inside had been accessed and the real estate had given the builder the keys against our request.The real estate should not be handing out our keys when we do not know about the entry. If they had advised us that he was going to hand out the keys to our house regardless of our wanting to be there, we could have organized for a friend or someone to be home so that we did not feel uncomfortable about someone accessing our property without our knowledge. We are also uncomfortable about the continual last-minute notice to access to our property.I raised this with the real estate manager and he just never replied, I feel we have had our privacy invaded.
    Hide Replies (4)
    • Annef 2 months ago
      Also sometimes insurance won’t cover you if items go missing during inspections as they deem you have invited the person into your home.But you haven’t you’ve been forced into it
    • Paul1970 2 months ago
      That agent broke the law. Letting in the tradie was illegal.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Lateesha 2 months ago
        I rang the RTA and they said it is legal for the real estate to hand out the keys, with or without our permission. I thought that was odd but took their word for it.
    • Cathe_78 2 months ago
      You know, I'm not entirely sure that many real estate agents even read emails sent by tenants. I've had plenty of real estate agents who've never answered (or responded in any way) to emails I've sent them about properties I've been renting. They do occasionally respond to phone calls, though.
  • kingo 2 months ago
    Question 1: My experience with entry has always been acceptable.Question 2: I find them acceptable.Question 3: A weeks notice for property inspections seems reasonable.
  • Tony Dale 2 months ago
    I think the present RTA Entry practices and privacy are about correct.Also you should be able to request shorter times 24-48 hours
  • Annef 2 months ago
    I think if the landlord decides to sell their rental property the tenant should be able to move out without any penalties. Otherwise you can have numerous people wandering through,open inspections and maintenance which could have been done during the tenancy. There is no quiet enjoyment when this occurs.
    Hide reply (1)
    • DavidSGDI 2 months ago
      You can actually leave the property when it is listed for sale (as long as you did not sign the lease while it was listed). You still have to go through the normal leaving procedure in regards to notice.
  • smokey 2 months ago
    Removed by moderator.
  • ahl 2 months ago
    It all starts with a good agent who respects both sides. Most owners have also been tenants in their life and most want to have good happy tenants and maintain their properties. There is a shortage of good agents..
  • Concerned owner 2 months ago
    I think the current rules around this are satisfactory. If everyone abides by the rules, there shouldn't be a problem. There should be something in place around the reporting of issues from the tenant to the owner through the agent, and if the agent isn't doing their job, penalties should apply. I have had the experience of dodgey agents who are not doing their job properly and this is a huge issue for tenants and owners alike. Work to the rules and do your job properly
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    • Angela Ballard 2 months ago
      Satisfactory for whom? Certainly not renters who have indicated strongly that inspections are the greatest impost on their privacy. Ground level agent practice is lazy - one size fits all on robo inspections - without any consideration as to whether a property or tenants need checking up on
  • LeaBrant 2 months ago
    Have never had any problems with entry by property manager or trdies. Always notified 4 weeks in advance re inspections and also tradies call to make appropriate time for visit / repairs.
  • irtapil 2 months ago
    tenants should be given notice of maintenance or other disruption in "common areas". We've had extensive dusty work carried out in our shared garage area without warning to move our cars. We've also had painting in the hallway obstructing our only exit to our flat, thankfully they courteously let us know about the hallway, but according to the letter of the law there's no obligation to give us any warning?
    Hide reply (1)
    • Kpsubs 2 months ago
      Yes, I’ve noticed tenants in our 5 storey block have different notice timings to the owner occupiers. Someone from the body corp knocks on the owners door to let them know that some maintenance is planned. Nothing is shared to tenants.
  • Penstarr 2 months ago
    Notice periods for entry to properties for repairs and maintenance and to show prospective tenants and purchasers should increase from 24 hours to 48 hours. If the agent or owner puts an Entry Notice in your letterbox, your 24 hours starts from when they place the notice in the letterbox. Some people aren't aware of the notice at all given the timeframe.
    Hide Replies (2)
    • Lateesha 2 months ago
      I agree, I get a phone call at 5.30pm for wanting access the next day so I tell them no, I nee the appropriate amount of notice so then they call at 5pm on a Friday for entrance on Monday. Again, this is not enough time to let work know I need to be home. This happens regularly from our real estate.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Kpsubs 2 months ago
        This is because there is no respect for the tenant even though the rent is needed for both agent and landlord. They seem to forget that.
  • MLN 2 months ago
    I think the inspections are too frequent and invasive. Tenants with good records should have less inspections and entry should not be allowed with tenant present
    Hide Replies (4)
    • BronwynJ 2 months ago
      How are tradies and PM’s supposed to do their jobs if the tenant has to be home for entry? How are we going to actually make that work. Do you really want to use your leave days to be home from work to let a plumber in?
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      • irtapil 2 months ago
        yes, a lot of people would use their leave days, and we often need a lot more than 24 hours notice to arrange that. I worry about booking things like dental work or holidays, in case the agent wants to invade my space at 24 hours notice with no room for negotiation, and i have to find someone i trust to do it or get stuck with a couple of hundred bucks in cancellation fees for changing my plans. I feel like i can't go overseas or anything while i'm renting.
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        • BronwynJ 2 months ago
          I understand you point of view, but we really can't leave some maintenance issues, particularly around water leaks go unattended. If we have to have a tenant home for every entry, we will not be able to attend to issues. As you can imagine, we have tenants on all kinds of work rosters and work away so it is just not practical to insist someone is home for every entry. Our tradies try really hard to ensure they phone tenants to arrange a mutual entry time but often the tenants won't take the call from an unknown number or don't return a message. The trouble with what you are suggesting is that is only works for the majority of tenants who do the right thing but unfortunately we need rules that will deal with the minority as well.
      • chrisoregan 2 months ago
        Property owners - who have more say over who comes in and out of their home than tenants do - do this all the time. If it's good enough for them, it should be good enough for tenants. As it is, tenants often have to shake up their schedule so they can be around when "routine" inspections or entries happen without their consent because a tenant should really have the right to know what is happening in their home.
  • Feeney 2 months ago
    Time frames no longer than 2 hours, and remove the verbal permission, as tenants feel pressured to say yes for fear of repercussions, it also invaded the “ quite enjoyment of property” as per the act
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    • irtapil 2 months ago
      i didn't know there was a verbal permission rule? but yes i certainly would feel pressured if put on the spot like that.
    • Jacquik 2 months ago
      Verbal permission generally makes things more flexible, a phone call from a tradie to ask ‘what time suits you’ for example. Removing verbal permission would mean more notices just saying ‘coming at x time’. notices are also required to have the phone number of who’s entering and it’s common for tenants to phone and say ‘hi plumber you’ve sent notice to come in Tuesday, could we do Wednesday instead?’
  • Emmadeanne 2 months ago
    I am also an onsite manager so inspections are not really a problem for me as I know my tenants, I see them everyday. If someone wants to be present during inspections that's fine I can be flexible with my times but it must be more difficult for real estate agents whose office hour coincide with tenants' working hours to inspect when a tenant is present. I would never dream of 'going through' tenants' personal possessions but surprisingly many leave cupboards and drawers open so I can take a look. I still don't.I prefer not to take photographs although most tenants don't seem to mind. If the owner cannot be present we can Skype the inspection that way there are not permanent photos that might find their way onto social media which is what I find worries most tenants. I find a greater problem arises when a rental property is being sold with tenants in residence. The selling agent wants to have as many buyers inspect as possible and some expect daily inspections obviously this is very intrusive for tenants. The act just says sales inspections must be a reasonable times and a reasonable time must elapse between inspections. What is reasonable to one person is unreasonable to another and disagreements often arise with the letting agent being in the middle.One selling agent insisted I issue a tenant with a breach notice after that tenant would not allow a sales inspection because her children were both very sick. I think this is part of the act that needs reform. It should state the maximum number of inspections allowed each week unless the tenant agrees to more. The owner has the right to sell his or her property but neither they or the agent should lose sight of the fact that it is the tenants' home who have a right to peaceful enjoyment of the property.
  • Tonia2016 2 months ago
    Entry is fine as is. As long as appropriate notice is given and entries are only done within reasonable hours I cannot see an issue with the current legislation regarding this.
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    • Lillian 2 months ago
      No problems with present situation
  • Rosebud 2 months ago
    Don’t like them agent doing inspection with out 1 of us being at home. Who is to say there not looking in your personal items ? If somthing goes missing you have no come back on insurance as you know they would becoming in.
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    • Lillian 2 months ago
      Tenants are not always home as they work as I am a sole trader I am known to tenants.
  • JulietteH 2 months ago
    It seems very sensible that over the course of a tenancy the frequency of inspections would reduce. It does feel like an invasion of privacy particularly when carried out by an unknown person. Obviously landlords are entitled to keep an eye on their property’s condition and this has to be weighed against the tenant’s right to privacy.
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    • Lillian 2 months ago
      Yes