Give feedback | Renting in Queensland

We’ve developed a Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) that identifies policy options to change Queensland’s tenancy laws and the impacts of each option.

For an overview of the policy options, read the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement executive summary (PDF, 1.71 MB), or read the RIS (PDF, 6.58 MB) in its entirety. You should read the RIS before you start.

We want your feedback on the reform options. The options for reform are divided into 5 priority areas:

We want to know your views about the options and how they may affect you.

You can give your feedback on the 5 priority areas below, or by making a written submission.

Submissions close 5pm AEST, 28 December 2019.

We’ve developed a Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS) that identifies policy options to change Queensland’s tenancy laws and the impacts of each option.

For an overview of the policy options, read the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement executive summary (PDF, 1.71 MB), or read the RIS (PDF, 6.58 MB) in its entirety. You should read the RIS before you start.

We want your feedback on the reform options. The options for reform are divided into 5 priority areas:

We want to know your views about the options and how they may affect you.

You can give your feedback on the 5 priority areas below, or by making a written submission.

Submissions close 5pm AEST, 28 December 2019.

  • We considered 6 different options for changing the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008 (RTRA Act) that relate to pet ownership in the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (C-RIS). 


    Six options considered

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes). Tenants, owners and property managers negotiate arrangements for keeping pets. Owners have the right to refuse pets without providing a reason. Tenants have no legal right to challenge the refusal.

    Option 2: Enhanced self-regulation through information disclosure measures such as a pet resume template.

    Option 3: Information disclosure measures plus legislation to allow

    We considered 6 different options for changing the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008 (RTRA Act) that relate to pet ownership in the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (C-RIS). 


    Six options considered

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes). Tenants, owners and property managers negotiate arrangements for keeping pets. Owners have the right to refuse pets without providing a reason. Tenants have no legal right to challenge the refusal.

    Option 2: Enhanced self-regulation through information disclosure measures such as a pet resume template.

    Option 3: Information disclosure measures plus legislation to allow special pest control and carpet cleaning lease conditions for tenants with pets.

    Option 4: Information disclosure measures combined with legislation to require property owners to have reasonable grounds for refusing a tenant’s request to keep a pet 

    • provide an option for the property owner to obtain a tribunal order permanently excluding pets from a property 
    • allow special pest control and carpet cleaning lease conditions for tenants with pets.

    Option 5: Legislation to require property owners to obtain a tribunal order to refuse a tenant’s request to keep a pet.

    Option 6: Allow property owners to charge an additional pet bond.


    The recommended option

    The costs and benefits of each option were analysed for several groups that may be impacted by the proposed reforms, including tenants, property owners and property managers. This analysis has resulted in recommending:

    Option 4—Information disclosure measures combined with reasonable grounds, tribunal order and special conditions legislation; and 

    Option 6—Allow owners to charge a separate pet bond. 

    We strongly advise that you read the C-RIS module on Renting with Pets before answering the following questions. This module can be found here: Renting with pets


    Take Survey
  • Under the current Act, tenants must have written permission from an owner to attach fixtures or make structural changes to a rental property. Owners cannot reasonably refuse a request, but they can add conditions to the permission. Currently there is no definition of what fixtures and structural changes are.


    Three options considered 

    The department considered three options relating to minor modifications as part of its review of the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes)

    Option 2: Tenants allowed to make minor modifications without consent

    Under the current Act, tenants must have written permission from an owner to attach fixtures or make structural changes to a rental property. Owners cannot reasonably refuse a request, but they can add conditions to the permission. Currently there is no definition of what fixtures and structural changes are.


    Three options considered 

    The department considered three options relating to minor modifications as part of its review of the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes)

    Option 2: Tenants allowed to make minor modifications without consent of the property owner and no requirement to restore the property at the end of the tenancy.

    Option 3: Establish mechanisms to manage minor modifications with appropriate safeguards for property owners to protect their investment. This includes notices and notice periods, reasonable grounds for refusing requests for minor modification for tenants’ amenity or personalisation, and requiring owners to seek a QCAT order to refuse health, safety, accessibility or security modifications.

    The costs and benefits of each option were analysed for several groups that may be impacted by the proposed reforms, including tenants, property owners and property managers.


    The recommended option

    Option 3: Establish mechanisms to manage minor modifications with appropriate safeguards for property owners to protect their investment. 

    This includes notices and notice periods, reasonable grounds for refusing requests for minor modification for tenants’ amenity or personalisation and requiring owners to seek a QCAT order to refuse health, safety, accessibility or security modifications. 

    We strongly advise that you read the RIS module on Minor Modifications before answering the following questions. This module can be found here.

    What is a minor modification?

    In both Option 2 and Option 3, is proposed that a minor modification be defined.

    In Option 3, a minor modification is defined as an alteration or addition to a rental property which:

    • can be reasonably rectified, removed or repaired so the property may be restored to the same condition (fair wear and tear excepted)
    • is not permanent (does not permanently modify surfaces, fixtures or the structure of the property)
    • does not require local council approval

    Take Survey
  • We are interested in your views on this issue. We are not asking for any personal details or experiences of domestic and family violence. If you or someone you know needs support in relation to domestic and family violence matters, please contact DV Connect on 1800 811 811.


    Three options considered

    We considered 3 different options for changing the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008 (RTRA Act) that relate to domestic and family violence in the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (C-RIS). 

    The options looked at how to support tenants experiencing domestic and family

    We are interested in your views on this issue. We are not asking for any personal details or experiences of domestic and family violence. If you or someone you know needs support in relation to domestic and family violence matters, please contact DV Connect on 1800 811 811.


    Three options considered

    We considered 3 different options for changing the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008 (RTRA Act) that relate to domestic and family violence in the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (C-RIS). 

    The options looked at how to support tenants experiencing domestic and family violence.

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes).

    Option 2: Communication and education campaign.

    Option 3: Improve tenancy law protections for tenants experiencing domestic and family violence to:

    • End tenancies quickly
    • Access part rental bonds
    • Install safety and security measures


    The recommended option

    Option 3: We analysed the options for their effectiveness, and considered the costs and benefits of each option for different impacted groups including tenants, property owners and property managers.

    This analysis resulted in recommending Option 3.

    We strongly advise that you read the C-RIS module on Domestic and Family Violence before answering the following questions. This module can be found here: Domestic and family violence.


    Take Survey
  • We considered 6 different options for changing the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008 (RTRA Act) that relate to ending tenancies fairly in the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (C-RIS). 


    Six options considered

    We considered options for ensuring tenancies are ended fairly and tenants can enforce their rights without fear of retaliatory action.

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes). 

    Option 2: Undertake an enhanced education and awareness program to improve transparency regarding ending a tenancy. 

    Option 3: Remove ability for ALL parties to end tenancy agreements without grounds.

    Option 4:

    We considered 6 different options for changing the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008 (RTRA Act) that relate to ending tenancies fairly in the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (C-RIS). 


    Six options considered

    We considered options for ensuring tenancies are ended fairly and tenants can enforce their rights without fear of retaliatory action.

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes). 

    Option 2: Undertake an enhanced education and awareness program to improve transparency regarding ending a tenancy. 

    Option 3: Remove ability for ALL parties to end tenancy agreements without grounds.

    Option 4: Remove ability for ONLY property owners and managers to end tenancy agreements without grounds.

    Option 5: Require property owners and managers to only end tenancy agreements for approved reasons (and introduce additional grounds). 

    Option 6: Retain ability for all parties to end tenancies ‘without grounds’ but extend the notice period for owners as a deterrent from misuse.

    The costs and benefits of each option were analysed for several groups that may be impacted by the proposed reforms, including tenants, property owners and property managers.


    The recommended option

    Option 5: Require property owners and managers to only end tenancy agreements for approved reasons (and introduce additional grounds). 

    We strongly advise that you read the C-RIS module on Managing Tenancies before answering the following questions. This module can be found here: Ending a tenancy fairly.


    Take Survey
  • We considered five different options for changing the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008 (RTRA Act) in relation to rental housing quality and minimum housing standards were considered in the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (C-RIS).


    Five options considered

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes). Existing repair and maintenance rights and obligations for tenants, owners and managers will be maintained in tenancy laws and agreements. Property owners must continue to comply with safety and quality regulations that apply to all residential dwellings.

    Option 2: Education and awareness and voluntary housing quality guidelines.

    We considered five different options for changing the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008 (RTRA Act) in relation to rental housing quality and minimum housing standards were considered in the Consultation Regulatory Impact Statement (C-RIS).


    Five options considered

    Option 1: Status quo (no changes). Existing repair and maintenance rights and obligations for tenants, owners and managers will be maintained in tenancy laws and agreements. Property owners must continue to comply with safety and quality regulations that apply to all residential dwellings.

    Option 2: Education and awareness and voluntary housing quality guidelines. The existing regulatory framework would be complemented by voluntary housing quality guidelines. Information and awareness would encourage owners and managers to improve quality of rental properties.

    Option 3: Enhanced repairs and maintenance provisions by enhancing existing processes and obligations for routine and emergency repairs in tenancy laws and agreements. This could apply to:

    • increasing the time given for tenants to complete the entry condition report
    • providing tenants with contact details for nominated repairers and property owners
    • increasing the amount tenants can authorise for emergency repairs
    • allowing property managers to authorise repairs up to a set amount
    • enhancing QCAT repair orders

    Option 4: Introducing prescribed minimum housing standards to ensure Queensland rental properties (including moveable dwellings and rooming accommodation) are safe, secure and functional.

    Option 5: Prescribe minimum housing standards for rental accommodation supported by enhanced repair and maintenance provisions (combination of options 3 and 4). Strengthened repairs and maintenance obligations with more effective compliance and enforcement mechanisms would support and complement implementation of prescribed minimum housing standards for rental properties. Option 5 would require a staged implementation and education program to raise awareness of the prescribed minimum housing standards, repairs and maintenance and compliance and enforcement arrangements.

    The costs and benefits of each option were analysed for several groups that may be impacted by the proposed reforms, including tenants, property owners and property managers.


    The recommended option

    Option 5: Introducing Minimum Housing Standards for Safety, Security and Functionality Combined with Enhanced Repairs and Maintenance Provisions. This option is recommended based on the analysis of the net benefits.

    We strongly advise that you read the C-RIS module on Rental housing quality and minimum housing standards before answering the following questions. This module can be found here: Minimum housing standards.


    Take Survey