Healthy Queenslanders | Sport and Recreation Strategy

Consultation has concluded

If we start taking part in physical activity from a young age, we build physical literacy (competency in movement skills), and this is key to lifelong participation in sport and active recreation. It’s critical to get kids moving early in life so they can build confidence in their abilities and the necessary skills to stay active as they get older.

Regular physical activity provides many benefits for children including helping them to develop healthy bones, muscles, joints, heart and lungs while building their coordination and movement control and maintaining a healthy weight.

Participating in physical activity, including organised sports, has been repeatedly linked to positive social, emotional and behavioural outcomes. Regular physical activity in children and young people improves their mental health, self-esteem, self-confidence, self-awareness and social skills while enhancing their capacity for learning to improve their performance at school.

The health benefits of remaining physically active throughout our lives are well known, but often, as the pressures of life and work increase, can be harder to achieve. Our research tells us that the older we are, the less likely we are to participate in sport and active recreation.

Get moving whatever your age

Research suggests that being physically active as we age can help to promote health and manage disability related to vascular disease, heart disease, stroke, osteoarthritis, obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Physical activity can also enhance quality of life, wellbeing and cognitive function in older people. Being physically active does not just enhance physical wellbeing. There is also growing evidence that it can improve mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety.

If we start taking part in physical activity from a young age, we build physical literacy (competency in movement skills), and this is key to lifelong participation in sport and active recreation. It’s critical to get kids moving early in life so they can build confidence in their abilities and the necessary skills to stay active as they get older.

Regular physical activity provides many benefits for children including helping them to develop healthy bones, muscles, joints, heart and lungs while building their coordination and movement control and maintaining a healthy weight.

Participating in physical activity, including organised sports, has been repeatedly linked to positive social, emotional and behavioural outcomes. Regular physical activity in children and young people improves their mental health, self-esteem, self-confidence, self-awareness and social skills while enhancing their capacity for learning to improve their performance at school.

The health benefits of remaining physically active throughout our lives are well known, but often, as the pressures of life and work increase, can be harder to achieve. Our research tells us that the older we are, the less likely we are to participate in sport and active recreation.

Get moving whatever your age

Research suggests that being physically active as we age can help to promote health and manage disability related to vascular disease, heart disease, stroke, osteoarthritis, obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Physical activity can also enhance quality of life, wellbeing and cognitive function in older people. Being physically active does not just enhance physical wellbeing. There is also growing evidence that it can improve mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety.