Repairs and maintenance

by Alison, 13 days ago
The Open Doors to Renting Reform community consultation has now closed. Thank you for having your say on how we can improve renting in Queensland.

Tell us what you think:

  • What does ‘clean’, ‘fit to live in’ and ‘in good repair’ for rental properties mean for you?
  • How could managing the ongoing repair and maintenance of rental properties be improved?
  • How can we improve the way in which damage caused to a Queensland rental property is dealt with?

The Open Doors to Renting Reform community consultation has now closed. Thank you for having your say on how we can improve renting in Queensland.

  • foxje about 2 months ago
    I don't think you can define "Clean", "Fti to live in" and "In good repair" as it will vary for everyone. However, landlords should be obliged to maintain the condition of the property as it was marketed or as it was reasonably understood to be at the start of the tenancy. Ie if there was always a working gas stove and it breaks during the tenancy, the landlord should be obliged to get it fixed. However, if there was never a working gas stove, the landlord cannot be obliged to install one unless it was agreed to in the tenancy agreement. I have never had many issues with damage but I think the Act should allow for increased bond amounts beyond the 4 weeks by mutual agreement between tenant and landlord, and only by incremental installments. Nowdays repairs are so expensive 4 weeks rent seems to not cover much, particularly if there is rent in arrears. This will help tenants who find it difficult to get a rental property give some peace of mind to the prospective owner. The Act could permit 4 weeks bond up front and then another 4 weeks bond to be paid incrementally with the rent over the course of 12 months (for example), I am sure that would help ensure tenants are given more to negotiate with.
    Hide Replies (29)
    • homelesswithpets about 2 months ago
      Removed by moderator.
    • Van about 2 months ago
      Hi foxje. I understand that tenants causing damage is a worry for landlords. I have seen a few stories on these boards so far of landlords with insurance still being left out of pocket after a rogue tenant wrecked their property. However, I respectfully disagree with allowing owners to take more bond. There are a lot of low-income renters who could ill afford to have eight weeks' worth of rent locked up in a bond, if they could even afford it in the first place. That would be true even if the extra four weeks was paid in installments. It's often hard for low-income renters to find a property as it is. It would be even worse if they had to compete with people who can afford to agree to a bond of eight weeks' rent they can't match. Maybe instead we should be asking why are landlords with insurance being left out of pocket. Why is the insurance inadequate? Is this a problem with the insurance companies? Does the government need to look at reforming landlord insurance standards too?
      Hide Replies (25)
      • Holmes about 2 months ago
        Van, I disagree with you. A landlord should be able to charge higher bonds if they have to ask a tenant to fix damage or if the tenant wants extra people or particularly DOGS. A landlord could easily invest $500,000 in a rental only for some feral to ruin it and the bond of $1800 to $2000 won’t cover much at all let alone loss of rent. I he property we are in now was trashed by the previous tenants, their dogs ruined the yard and we have had to clean the carpets three times to get the Dog odour and filth out of the carpets, we have also had to resort the back and side lawn. These tenants left after being evicted yet hadn’t paid for over 6 weeks rent, the lawn and carpets came to over $1200, plus re painting the living rooms and fixing a door frame they chewed. I’m in favour of a basic bond, 4 weeks rent plus one weeks bond per person or cat, and four weeks per dog if the landlord allows a dog, I wouldn’t. No, the government does not need to look at reforming landlord insurance, but they do need to allow las supporting landlords recovering all damages and loses form feral tenants.
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        • avava about 2 months ago
          Holmes - I often wonder why renters resort to such things. If they were behind in the rent, why didn't they just leave...end of story. Didn't the real estate agent have inspections...if so they would have spotted all this damage during their tenancy, they would have noticed the dogs ruining the yard, they would have noticed filth on the carpets...(as a renter I don't want carpets and if I were a landlord, I wouldn't even have carpets), didn't they notice a chewed door frame or marks on the walls, why weren't those things noticed prior and addressed then. Why was the house trashed...did they feel disrespected by the agents or the landlord. Were they only seen as 'ferals'...if so, their answer was to cost you money. I just wonder why this happens so often with some renters, if they know that landlords and real estate agents see them as 'second class citizens'...and 'ferals' then that is how they will act...In regards to charging them higher bonds, well...how can they give what they don't have, many live from week to week...and you are asking for a bond of '4 weeks rent plus 1 weeks bond per person or cat and 4 weeks for a dog'...so if a couple, plus 4 children, plus a cat and dog want to move in...(doing the maths from what we pay)...that would cost us $4000.00...just for the bond...what low income renter or person on welfare can afford that. Obviously there will be mass homelessness soon...as it is, if the rent exceeds 33% of your income, you are not allowed a rental. So many on low income/welfare can't even afford a rental now, but you want them to pay a huge bond in advance...and If you want the g'ment to support landlords in recovering damage from renters, then renters should also be supported and protected in regards to their rights as renters...fair is fair...If one has rights and redress, then the other should also have equal rights and redress...
          Hide Replies (10)
          • Holmes about 2 months ago
            One thing that never ceases to amaze me is people keep trading tax and welfare, or rental costs and welfare. It is NOT any landlords job wether private or public, to make a house or rental affordable to a tenant, the market will set prices based on supply and demand, the cost of the rental, then outgoings such as rates and interest. If few people want a rental the price is lower, if more want it the price is higher. Similarly, a rental might cost more for a landlords risk, a poor tenant history and so on. It is also not any landlords job to accept a dog or lower bonds as they cannot afford rent. If they can’t afford rent or a bond then why do they have a dog in the first place? Welfare is there to subsidise people who cannnot (or will not) support themselves, it comes from other taxpayers earnings, this is what welfare is for, not a landlord. I will finish with, no one is entitled to a rental home, like money it must be earnt by their hard work, building a reputation and proving they can look after it. FYI. I rent myself and have to go through many of the things you describe but have never had an issue with a rental. I negotiate hard and really look after a property, no dogs either!
            Hide Replies (8)
            • avava about 2 months ago
              Don't forget those on welfare pay tax, it's called the GST...The market...supply and demand...all just a man made economy that favours the greedy. Supply is held back, so demand for rentals increases and rents increase. Nothing to do with anything but the rich riding on the backs of the poor...all done on purpose. So... no one is entitled to a rental home...obviously the world will be a better place when the poor are all homeless and no one can afford the rents...then surprize surprize...there will be a huge drop in rents...but I'm sure the home owners would prefer the houses stay empty, rather than let the poor live in them for nothing...after all, life isn't about community and empathy...just the entitled rich blaming the poor for the predicament the rich put them in...spoken like a true baby boomer...
              Hide Replies (7)
              • Holmes about 2 months ago
                Please Avaya, and no. This evening on welfare are still on welfare, they are net beneficiaries, they pay a small amount of gst on the gods they buy, but they do not contribute to Australia financially or pay income tax, and any gst is from the earnings of others paid to the beneficiaries by the government. And supply is NOT held back, it’s called the market working, it’s basic economics, not a conspiracy theory for those who can’t work it out. The poor are poor largely through their own doing, either a lack of work, education or lack of, or circumstances. I myself am not rich, nor am I a baby boomer as you try and point out. But I do believe in self responsibility, and I certainly do not believe in landlords subsidising tenants, nor tenants subsidising landlords. Rather, the market will find the right rate, it’s called the market rate.
                Hide reply (1)
                • Worfe 21 days ago
                  Holmes, I hope life treats you well, but I must take exception with you. I have worked since I was 15 and have paid tax all my life and have never been unemployed.. For the last thirty years, I have run my own business which was moderately profitable. Then came along major health issue which caused me to lose my house Business and Superannuation and drove me into bankruptcy.. I cannot work any longer and exist on the old age pension, this in return makes it very hard to rent. Brisbane is out of the question and now live in the Country and how dare you to say that this was my own doing, you should be ashamed of yourself and I am sure I'm not the only one
              • Dannette about 2 months ago
                Removed by moderator.
              • Dannette about 2 months ago
                Avava, so many of your comments and opinions are incorrect.Renters cannot just up and leave because they are behind in rent – that is why there is a tenancy agreement, which is there to protect both sides. It costs a great deal of time and money to find a tenant, go through the approval process and do up the paperwork.Inspections are done and tenants get a Notice to Remedy breach if there is damage etc – which in all honesty means nothing unless the tenant is willing to do the right things, and they wouldn’t be getting a breach notice if they were doing the right thing in the first place. Noticing a dog has done damage (for example) you give them a notice, they don’t remedy, you give them notice to leave, they don’t go, you then have to go to court (which takes WEEKS), and during this the tenant decides they are not going to pay any rent (because they are being disrespected), and when they are finally out, you have a huge rent loss and a large repair bill from all the damage.When a property is purchased as an investment property, the landlord doesn’t go and rip up any carpet because they are putting a renter in. And just because you don’t want carpet, MANY other renters do want carpet, and most people have an ability to look after it, because it really isn’t that hard to look after it.But why was the house trashed? Because they felt they were being disrespected by the landlord or agent??? The best way to get someone’s respect is to trash a house…NOT!!! There is NO EXCUSE to trash a property because you feel disrespected. Everyone has the ability to behave the way they want and to blame someone else for the way you behave is a cop out and very immature. Those that trash a house and behave like a feral have only themselves to blame – NO ONE ELSE! And anyone who behaves in that sort of manner deserves to be treated with disrespect and it is that exact tenant that is giving the rest of all the good tenants a bad name and making it harder for them.Regarding the low income earner and welfare recipients…I have had many people apply to rent a unit from me and they get a higher ‘income’ than me because of the handouts from Centrelink! Yet you consider me to be the ‘rich’ riding on the backs of the 'poor'. FYI, just because you own a property that you rent out, does not mean that you are rich and are not living from week to week. Most of the people I know who are those ‘rich’ landlords are hardworking people who have gone without to get themselves into an investment property and while the deed might have their name on it saying they own the property, it is the bank that truly owns it as it has lent them money to buy it. We then have to pay thousands in insurance, rates, and possibly land tax, plus all those little repairs along the way. And then you get one of those tenants who were behind on their rent and let the dog chew the wall that finally leave, and we have to start the long and arduous task of trying to make a claim on said insurance, spending weeks fighting the insurance company to have the claim for the damaged paid for, or end up having taking the tenant to court to try to regain some of the costs.Oh and then when we as the landlord are struggling to pay for all of that, decide to pull the property off the market and loose more money having it untenanted just so the price of rentals go up. Seriously, your comments are nonsensical! But why is it up to the agent/landlord to pull the tenant up that the dog is chewing the wall? Should it not be the responsibility of the grown adult whom lives in the house to pull the dog up. I bet the dog is not even supposed to be inside the property (because there is carpets) but the tenant thinks that it is OK for them to break the rules because they are the hard done by poor ones being treated like a feral.I suggest that all the renters whom complain about the cost of renting and how landlords are ripping you all off, to understand that no one is forcing you to rent, and you do have a choice. Go buy your own property and live it. Then you can go what you will with the carpet and the dogs. And once you own your own property, you will see just how much it costs to own and maintain a property and you will then realise that your comments about landlords are unsupported. Of course not everyone can afford that though, so you are left with renting, and you should be grateful that someone has had the ability to purchase a property to rent it out, and to understand that they have worked very hard to get it and you should treat the property with respect. And if you are being treated with disrespect from an agent or a landlord, have a look at your own behaviour and if you truly think that you have not contributed to the way they are treating you, go to a different agent/landlord because we are not all the same, just as tenants are not. I have been burnt so many times in the past, (currently fighting the insurance company on $20000 worth of damage), and every time I have that empathy you expect from us landlords, tenants blatantly take advantage of me and it chips a little more of my faith away that the next person will be honourable and I find myself thinking the worst from the next tenant.To finish off, there is free support, legal advice and financial assistance for tenants, but for Landlords if we want something…we have to outlay money! Please don’t cry poor, you have the best support out of us all!
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                • Holmes about 2 months ago
                  Very well said Dannette, and I’m a tenant currently but have experienced how bad a lot of tenants are. We ran a business and some of our work was repairing rentals and maintaining them for property managers, the state of some was just shocking. I only wish the rules were applied to the management of state homes as well, and their tenants were held to account for not keeping the home safe up to scratch.
                • Satellite about 2 months ago
                  DannetteEverything you have said is true. Thank you so much for writing this article. It's about time the Government realised that by giving all the power to the tenants (which is currently the case), and the landlord bearing all the costs (going to Tribunal etc etc ) will mean more and more landlords will sell. It's time to make it a fairer situation.
              • Over it about 1 month ago
                Avava one of your comment is offensive to landlords who actually work and not rich, to be honest this forum is making me reconsider renting my cottage for future tenants and yes I now would prefer my home empty than have a disrespectful poor person as you put it living in my rental property I will work extra hours if need be to cover this PS if every worker stop paying tax there is no welfare payments try see what happens in countries with no welfare help you are homeless and begging on the street .I am happy to pay tax to help those who are poor however when comments suggesting landlords are making money from the poor I do get insulted I don't care who rents my home from a economic background all I require is manners and a true love to look after my home they have full privacy and respect from myself and my property agents. Poor welfare etc does not even come into play when I choose a tenant I see them as human beings who need somewhere to live as we all do , try a little more kindness to one another we need to stop attacking and make this forum a place to fix issues so dodgy no longer is a word associated with renting from landlords and tenants. Both need protection and this forum can help to do this if we use well.
          • ArielCB about 1 month ago
            Hi avava, Tenants under lease cannot just leave - breaking a rental contract without paying until the property is re-leased results in loss of bond (if they even get it back) and a bad reputation which stops them from finding another home. Unlike R/E and landlords, tenants acquire a 'rental reputation' which follow them. It is a pity that R/E and landlords are exempt from this.
        • QLD Landlord about 2 months ago
          Holmes, I agree with your concept of greater tenant bond comensurate with greater landlord risk exposure. Problem is administration and delivery of this system. As a tenant, it took the agent 4 months to get an ensuite repaired due damage from previous “rouge” tenants. They told us the work could not be done until the landlords insurance claim was settled, so we went without a serviceable toilet, washbasin and shower for 4 months. Then at the 6 month tenancy point, the landlord had the hide to request increased rent to cover his increased insurance premium not withstanding the section in the Act that allows him to increase the rent every 6 months. We agreed to the rental incease (because we didn’t wish to move out in 30 days) and told him if he wanted the increase any sooner than in 4 months time, due to the loss of amenity we had previously paid for and not received, he could take us to the RTA for resolution. Of course he did not and we subsequently left for a better managed property at next lease renewal. The managing agent was as complicit to the whole insurance scam as the landlord.As a landlord, I prefer tenants without “pets” as inevitably man’s best friend leaves their mark wherever they go. I’m in the business of renting an investment property to decent people and accomodating them. Pets live outside, not inside houses, this is where the issues begin. As the government legislates for every tenant to legally have “pets” in every property as a right, then the governent can also to some degree carry the can for the tenants who won’t or don’t manage their “pets” appropriately. A higher risk tenant should attract higher bond requirements and if they are dissatisified with that, look elsewhere. Ultimately the market will decide and the ongoing issues of cats and dogs will all be discovered at the next quarterly inspection. Pet freedom comes at a price and it’s user pays. As a landlord I’m running a valuable investment property, not a tax free charity.
        • Protect me from thugs about 2 months ago
          Dogs in particular and pets in general have to be an absolute no no. What is it about the damage that these introduced feral pests create that people just do not get. One dog urinating on the floor has just made a rental unsafe to rent to any family with or planning childen. Landlords have a duty of care to provide safe housing no arguments. BUT that does not include the diseases and risks bought by having animals in the property.
        • Satellite about 2 months ago
          I am a retiree living off the rental income I currently get. I don't think tenants fully realise how much money landlords have to pay ie. rates (which are charged at more than other properties in the area just because they are rental properties), insurance and management fees. If something breaks or is not working and it is not due to tenant misuse I quickly have all repairs carried out. However, I have found that tenants expect landlords to pay for items that they have broken through misuse and claim it was like that when they moved in, even though it is not on the Entry Report they signed and they have been using the item for the past 9 months.My experience is that tenants know how to work the system. Contacting QSTARS whenever they can to make complaints. My last tenants absconded. They did not leave the keys to the property, they were in arrears with rent, and many other items were found damaged. My managing agent has obtained their Bond money but I am still out of pocket nearly $3,000. All emails sent to them they have ignored. When I seriously look at my Landlord Insurance Policy there are so many restrictions that I wonder whether it is worth the nearly $80 per month I pay. Tenants think that Landlords are building a business, or raking in a lot of money from their property. My experience is very different. I am always putting my hands in my pockets to pay for one thing or another. I have always tried to do the right thing by my tenants but alas I have to say, that to this point, it has not been reciprocated. The stress associated with owning this rental property is just too much. The tenant always seems to have the upper hand. If the new Tenancy Laws go further in favour of the tenant, I will certainly be selling my property.
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          • Holmes about 2 months ago
            And that is the issue to me. The law protects the terrible tenants and gives us good tenants a bad name. They need instruments and decent tribunals to hold the terrible tenants to account and tough if they can’t get another rental or scream they can’t afford to pay. If for fairness, but the bad tenants know they can get away with it.
        • ChristineA about 1 month ago
          Perhaps a solution would be for tenants to have some sort of "Tenant insurance". Not contents insurance but a policy that would pay for any damage not covered by the bond. The bond could then be used for outstanding rent but any accidental or malicious damage. Pet damage especially could be covered from this. Of course, I don't think it would be viable, the premiums would be outrageously expensive, due to the number and amount of claims that would be lodged.
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          • Holmes about 1 month ago
            Whilst (in my opinion) tenant insurance seems a good idea, a lot of tenants would not qualify at all, there are so many bad ones it would be like a convicted drunk driver applying for car insurance, not going to happen. The underlying cause is twofold, firstly some tenants have no idea of how to live in a home or take care of a landlords home, and secondly, they cannot afford a home but feel entitled and need one. The issue there is low or no wages and living off welfare, can’t afford a decent bond, so resort to bond loans etc, this in turn lowers their “ownership” of responsibility as they have nothing to lose. It sounds terrible but it’s high time to tell these terrible tenants to find a bridge. Here is a example of the reverse. We had an inspection just over a week ago, the property manager called to thank us for looking after the property, says it’s the best it’s ever been in, offered a new lease with lower rent!
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            • ChristineA about 1 month ago
              As it should be. We cannot appreciate good folk enough - owners or residents. We are actually considering holding 'how to live and take care of where you live classes'. Shame
        • Fast Eddy 25 days ago
          Yep! Gotta have a pet bond but also suitability of per for property e.g stop would u put a border collie in a studio apartment or dogs declared dangerous? Also I’ve canvassed people who’ve told me that they wouldn’t rent a property where there had been pets previously living inside. Not all cultures relate to pets living indoors!!! We have to also be sensitive to that !!
        • Gillian 16 days ago
          The system takes too long to get the bad tenant out, you have to be 18 days behind in rent before we can apply, the it takes weeks to get to qcat, then they give the tenant weeks to move all this time usually no rent is paid, so the bond has no way of covering the cost of rent let alone anything else. This is making it harder for the good tenants and I truly believe their are more good than bad
      • avava about 2 months ago
        Hello Van - yes I agree, many renters live from week to week, even if they are working, there are many expenses in life, not just rent that has to be paid. Landlords seem to forget that, they think the rent they are asking is cheap, yet add all the other expenses on top and people end up with nothing at the end of that week, add a few more dramas, like mechanical/doctor/dentist/vet/household expenses...and bingo...you go backwards at a very fast rate. It's odd how landlords expect those 'below them' to fill in their financial gaps, rather than those 'above them'...
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        • foxje about 2 months ago
          Hi avava, thank you for your considered comments again. I think it is worthwhile pointing out that many home owners and even landlords live essentially week-to-week as well. Budgets are tight and the mortgage always need to be paid, the same as rent. The same mechanical / doctor / dentist expenses can also throw a spanner in the works. For that reason I don't like to split up tenants vs owners or anything like that. We are all people trying to get by in what can sometimes be very difficult circumstances; yes some people have it tough but families get forced out of the home they owned very regularly if they can't afford to meet their mortgage payments. Just think back to when mortgage rates went up to 20%! I think Holmes' main point about the market is that the 'market' (being supply and demand) sets the rent rate, just as much as the 'market' sets the interest rates and mortgage payments that owners pay on their property. If the rent is too much, the owner will get vacancies and have to start dropping rents. Although yes, there can be a problem letting the market run rampant. No-one wants to see people on the streets. My personal viewpoint is that increasing regulation will actually result in more people living on the streets.
        • Satellite about 2 months ago
          Just to set the record straight. All the expenses that you have mentioned like mechanic/doctors/dentists/household expenses apply to landlords too! We don't get those expenses free???? Tenants seem to forget the cost involved in buying a property for tenants to rent. For example, the exorbitant stamp duty we have to pay (much higher than purchasing a property not for rent), legal fees, on going maintenance when tenants leave, taking bad tenants to Tribunal costs money with no certainty of a result in favour of the Landlord. And not forgetting the capital gains cost we pay when we decide to sell. For the record, I have never considered a tenant as being 'below' anyone. If you are prepared to go without say an i phone, holidays, nice cars, going to restaurants or bars etc etc like I have, you too could own your own property.
      • foxje about 2 months ago
        Hi Van, you might be right about the extra bond making it difficult for lower income people to negotiate to get a property. I didn't think about those implications. However I don't think we should be relying on insurance to cover for this. Ultimately insurance is merely a way for a collective group of people to pay for a single person's issue. If you extend it to the limits and every landlord had to collect insurance, then all landlords are simply forced to pay for it. I think we should still agree that in justice, whoever causes damage should be held responsible for rectifying it. No-one should be absolved from taking responsibility for what they have done.
    • Drew85 about 2 months ago
      Some great discussions here. I disagree with 8 weeks bond though- that seems quite excessive, there are a lot of great tenants out there doing the right thing that should not be financially penalised on the back of a couple of 'bad examples'.
    • Fast Eddy 25 days ago
      If only PMs did the new Entry Condition Report at beginning of each lease and re-lease. Then at the 3 monthly inspection, the tenant is supposed to be able to report any health, safety or maintenance issues
  • JustKay 16 days ago
    I, for one, would like to move into a property that has been cleaned...at least the oven has to be cleaned out and the walls washed down and the cupboards in kitchen and bedrooms have been cleaned. I leave a very clean property when I move and it would be nice to move into a house that is clean. Making sure the property being left is clean and then having to move and then clean the property you are moving into is unsatisfactory. There has to be some standardised cleaning benchmarks.
  • Worfe 21 days ago
    As a Tenant, I would only be too happy to pay a pet bond. We have two dogs very well house trained when we go out they stay in the garage so as not to annoy neighbours both are registered microchipped and vaccinated annually and have never had fleas. Also, all our rentals have never been broken into or vandalised. Yet still, this means nothing to some landlords.
  • MDK 24 days ago
    Real Estate inspection said I should water the yard.Why should I when everyone else's lawns are brown and in any case I have to pay for water usage?
  • Detinman about 1 month ago
    Perhaps its time for Landlords to have to put up a maintenance bond of sorts so if there are urgent repairs needed and they can't be contacted the work can be done.Once used in the capacity it was designed for this would then need to be topped up.This would stop shonky operators from putting agents in difficult positions.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Fast Eddy 25 days ago
      PMs have that condition to do a certain $value of repairs written into their contract with owners (form 6). Also tenant’s can arrange emergency repairs. Is your PM just not arranging the maintenance?
  • Bev D 26 days ago
    Landlords should be liable for repairs for ware and tare. We have waited for over two years for repairs to the non-working oven, sliding doors not sliding, light switches not working. We pay $485 a week and deserve to have these repairs sorted out.
  • Lindajne about 1 month ago
    In good repair: please hold All the electricity supply companies liable for damage to white goods caused by blackouts/ brownouts due to their poor preventative maintenance. Insurance premiums are excessive above Brisbane and most landlords and tenants have the maximum excess to try and minimise the insurance. We have had to replace numerous aircons/ ceiling fans/ lights/ ovens and fridges. Las year, a tenant recorded 40 brownouts in the area, the year before, 43. Ergon accept no responsibility. If the QLD wants to impose minimum standards, the State owned utility companies have to be made equally accountable for replacement goods.
  • LivingbytheBay about 1 month ago
    As a landlord, I will do my part by making sure the house is maintained and in good repair. Tenants need to also take responsibility here and treat the property with respect. It is important for me to be able to offset my repair costs through the taxation system, otherwise financially it become difficult, especially if there is deliberate or careless damage caused by tenants. Most landlords are not rich and the rental property is a valuable asset which they have worked hard to pay for. As a landlord, I really value good tenants and will go out of my way to make sure they are happy and live in a safe and well maintained home.
  • Del678 about 1 month ago
    Landlords should be responsible for maintenance due to aging: hinges coming loose, flooring coming up, railings getting wobbly.Tenants should be responsible for any maintenance due to usage: cleaning filters of dishwasher and air conditioners, keeping drains clear of fatty build-ups and hair, cleaning window and door tracks, keeping the oven clean. Unfortunately many tenants neglect these duties and the result is landlords removing appliances or refusing to fix appliances that keep “breaking” due to lack of proper care. Mould is a difficult problem. Silicon gets mouldy easily even in the cleanest bathroom. If you have steamy showers with the windows closed, your walls will get mouldy. If it is new and can be cleaned off with a sponge, the tenant should take some responsibility to clean regularly just as they would their own home. If it is persistent mould cause by damps, lack of ventilation, and an aged property then it is the landlord's responsibility. On the balance, I think the biggest problem is leases that are mysteriously not renews when a complaint is made or a breach issued. when I was a tenant 10 years ago I suffered this. Also as a tenant during the floods we also had the landlords "clean" the property but they did not remove the skirting and clean out the wall cavity which will have caused an ongoing mould problem - though it would have laid unseen for possibly years. We were well positioned enough to have saved to buy our own place in the depressed market but they went on to rent the property to housing commission and those who cannot be choosy.
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    • Holmes about 1 month ago
      Disagree re mould, as I have mentioned already, in 99% of cases mould is down to poor ventillation and cleaning. Yes some silicones get mould in them but it’s due to poor ventillation. Leave a window open in the room, if in a shower, leave the shower door open every second day when you’re out. Mould is ONLY a landlords problem if it’s due to water pooling in or under the structure. Mould is also easily cleaned by many products, chlorine’s, bleaches, mould removers and pine products. A weekly clean can get rid of it.
    • fnaoirtmhan about 1 month ago
      Walls are not moldy. Celing not moldy windows and vanishen blinds clean and not moldy.I have the window open every night and day and close the shower sliding door to my room so it is not noisy when the exorst fan is on and it is raining and have to close window.I'm now at the stage where the place may be classed unlivable due to the septic tanks over flowing into yard and the trenches are overflowing into storm drain.The septic guy who came said he can not sympathize for me enough and he has turned the owners away before as they are unreasonable and ugly nature human beings.
  • fnaoirtmhan about 2 months ago
    repairs & maintenance -currently I'm renting at $595 per week & 9 weeks in advance.-en-suite leaking threw wall into hall way, carpet turned black from mold, going on 20 months now and still not fixed. my 3 year old ( severe ASD autism) ate/liked the carpet and was hospitalized from pooing blood.) i did not know this was the casue until i have started the procedure of the act and involving the RTA.- hot water system blew. the plumber who replaced it told me the system was not earthed and that why me and my four toddlers were getting zapped when touching taps shower heads & water. -all house pipes backed up & come into the house from grey water pump braking and tank filled up.- grease trap over flowed into the grey water tank. the grease trap had not been emptied in over 7 years, the grey water pump was replaced 3 months before i moved in and the owners were told to get grease trap emptied as it is the reason of problem.- pool pipes cracked & loses 250L per day at a minimum when run, the entire lease going on 20 months, the owners were told of the leaks and massive issues with the pool but did not tell me as a new tenant.- paying full water rates when the house and pool has leaks, last bill was $760 for a quarter, even though the owners knew of water leaking problems.-pool pump stopped working 6 weeks ago, & im being blamed for breaking it becasue the pool is thick green and homing mosquitoes. (i have photos of the day it was reported and everyday since & it shows the pool crystal clear going to green and then the state it is now but im still getting the blame)-air con stopped working 3 weeks ago. - text, calls, emails, and in person Lessor threatening me and abusing me.- council has told me i will get the fines for the pool being green and not the owner even though i have shown solid proof. i will have to take it to QCAT to sue owner to pay for fine.so all of the above and no rent reduction in place & no compensation.RTA has been involved and they can not do any more.QSTARTS is some help but not much.i have found no matter what the Lessor/owner does, the law is on their side.now have to go to QCAT to get anything done. and even then i have been told i will be asked why i have not left or done anything until now.and because i have not left i will lose the case.this is not fair or right. owners/lessor/agents should fear the thought of not doing repairs and maintenance. the owners/lessor & or the agent should have fear in them of breaking the act/law , just like tenants do now.I have never had a bad name on my rental history, i did not know what RTA,QSTARTS,QCAT were until now, and i now fear leaving hear and renting another property as i now know tenants DO NOT HAVE RIGHTS.
    Hide Replies (2)
    • Holmes about 1 month ago
      I have worked in the home efficiency and repair sector for years, and with so much wrong and you not causing any of it, one must ask the question, why did you lease it?
      Hide reply (1)
      • fnaoirtmhan about 1 month ago
        Removed by moderator.
  • Pigsmightfly about 1 month ago
    I have seen people lose some bond money for trivial things ie, plug for laundry sink is missing etc and charged 3 times the amount of replacement. It should be regulated how much landlords/RE can charge. Frequently, the bond is taken but repairs are not made and the property is left in bad condition and tenants blamed. Bond is used by some landlords as a free grab and that should be unlawful and punishable as FRAUD. There must be a mechanism whereby if they take bond money then they show that repairs have been done - an audit. Some landlords consider bond to be an opportunity to line their own purse. Landlord insurance should be mandatory. I have lived in an expensive $750 a week property when I discovered the deck was unsafe - they got a builder out to inspect and he told me to keep everyone off the deck because it was ready to collapse. RE and landlords solution? “Stay off the deck or we won’t take any responsibility.” Tenant should live rent free while emergency repairs wait to ge done. Also, no already scheduled repairs/refurbisment/renovation to be done unless tenent agrees snd tenant lives rent free.
  • MumALLBoys about 2 months ago
    clean would mean no mould or dirty areas in the house that is hard to clean.there should be minimum standards for ongoing repairs. we have a number of leaking taps, toilet that leaks and a back sliding door thats really hard to open since it is broken. the owners arent interested in fixing things if damage is accidental then it could be covered by insurance. if damage is due to neglect and it is dangerous or you cant comfortably live in the rental property it should be fixed ASAP
    Hide Replies (16)
    • Fc35 about 2 months ago
      I agree the property should be maintained in good repair and be fit to live in. If a tenant damages something accidental or otherwise they should be responsible for fixing it, not the owner or the owners insurance.
    • foxje about 2 months ago
      Hi MumALLBoys Can I suggest you provide the agent with a Notice To Remedy form for the required repairs. The act stipulates required times for a number of repairs and the agent / owner legally can not take retaliatory action. In my experience agents are quite grateful for those forms as it gives them evidence to support their conversation with the owner.
    • foxje about 2 months ago
      Can I just also suggest that everyone’s version of “comfortable live” will be different. If cleanliness is a minimum standard, does that mean I have to clean my tenants house if I inspect and it doesn’t meet the minimum standard? I don’t want to force my view of how people should live onto their people and I don’t think the government should either. All the best.
    • Holmes about 2 months ago
      Ah, no I do not agree. If a tenant damages a home, or their kids or guests, then they should pay for it, NOT the owner or their insurance. If it was your own home you would be paying and it’s the same in life, you damage it you pay to fix it. In all my years in living in my own home or a rental, I haven’t broken anything I couldn’t fix or replace easily. Sorry I can’t agree with you onthis one.
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      • avava about 2 months ago
        Holmes - but should a tenant replace new for old/damaged/inefficient. I think of this as I look out my window. It is a very old window, with a few tiny chips/holes in the glass near the rubber, so that the wind whistles through it. When rain pelts against it, water fills the trays where the windows slide along and spills over onto the windowsill and then runs down the wall onto the carpet. So if I accidentally broke that old window, you think I should then buy a new window (2 in fact), because they don't have windows that old anymore, so they would come with 2 windows plus a frame and have it fitted, all at my expense, plus no doubt carpet or wall damage repaired...all at my expense...even thought the windows aren't up to today's seaside window/rain resistant council approved standard in the first place...So...yet again, the only person that benefits is the home owner, by insisting that the poor tenant pay for something that was old/damaged/inefficient in the first place...
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        • Holmes about 2 months ago
          In the case of a window yes, the tenant should replace it if it’s broken by then. A few chips are okay but not a huge crack. It’s also good practise to get some silicone and run it over the crack. It will stop the rain getting in. And the tenant should only pay for the glass and fitting. No upgrades to the frames.
        • foxje about 2 months ago
          Clearly "new-for-old" wouldn't be fair. Just whatever is needed to get it back to the same standard it was in prior to the damage. The RTA would support this in a dispute as well, there shouldn't be an issue there.
          Hide Replies (2)
          • Holmes about 2 months ago
            It’s a really difficult one, let’s look at a window in an older home. The tenants kids break it with a ball. The repairer says it’s a straight replacement, $50 for glass, $100 to fit it and the tenant agrees to do the painting. I think in this example the $150 cost is 100% the tenants responsibility, they broke it, it was intact previously. However, their neighbors kids broke a window at their place, the window will cost $50 for the glass and $100 to fit it, but as the retaining timber is rotting there is an additional $100 for new timber. In this case the tenant should pay $150 and the landlord $100 for the rotting timber (in my opinion). Several points here, the window was intact prior to the tenants breaking it and the rott was minor and might have lasted for years, it’s inconsequential in the scheme of things and the landlord may have never had to replace it, they may decline saying no you broke the window, the entire repair is over to you. What do others think?
            Hide reply (1)
            • foxje about 2 months ago
              I agree, I think you have to apportion the cost to whoever caused the damage. The rotting timber was not caused by the tenant so they shouldn't have to pay it. It would essentially be a depreciation expense which was realised.
        • Fc35 about 2 months ago
          With regards to replacing items that have been broken, it’s really about negotiating an outcome both parties are happy with. If the broken or damaged item is old & no longer available the tenant should pay a portion of the replacement cost, particularly if it still had plenty of life left & the owner would have had no need to replace otherwise.
    • Fc35 about 2 months ago
      Breach the owner
    • Jeanie about 2 months ago
      Any damage caused (accidental or otherwise) is the responsibility of the tenant. The property needs to be maintained to the same condition it was in when the tenancy began.
    • Jim640 about 1 month ago
      If a tenant wants insurance to cover their accidental damage, then the tenant should take out an pay for that insurance. It would be unreasonable to expect the owner or their insurance to pay for tenant damage irrespective of whether it was accidental, due to negligence or intentional. Where an owner is willing to provide accidental damage cover via their insurance, the rent should be increased to cover the cost of premiums.
      Hide Replies (3)
      • MumALLBoys about 1 month ago
        We our own insurance .... And have already had to use it for damage to our belongings ..... Due poor structure of our house .Not our fault .Over $ 4000Damage Owner wasn't even willing to pay small amount that could help stop this damage in future. 😖Sux to be us
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Over it about 1 month ago
          To mum of all boys this is why everyone is attacking landlords there are too many landlords who will not maintain their properties I so agree tenants should not fit the bill for a landlord like this one however as a landlord myself I start to feel very disappointed in see a lot of these rental nightmare's I considering remove my gorgeous little home.
          Hide reply (1)
          • MumALLBoys about 1 month ago
            If only there weren't so many dodgy rental property owners .We used to have our own home But lost it due to a lot of unforseen circumstances .So we treat this home as if it was ours and look after it and always pay rent on time .At a previous property the owner also did the wrong thing and the property manager said if we reported it.... That would not be good for us getting another rental .
  • Over it about 1 month ago
    Some landlords live week to week too what on earth makes some tenants think being broke is exclusive to only them, this forum is disappointing what is the point as a landlord ,working hard to keep house in good order paying for everything include year pest etc-last two weeks I earned $12.00 rent out of mortgage that cost $350.00 p/w also I got rates and thanks to my lease i also pay for all their water use PS they used twice as much as I did and they are elderly and don't work, I am now considering leave house empty taking off investment loan back to normal house loan and saving myself the grief, I have fully maintained my home and if they ask its fixed immediately please someone tell me why I should bother this forum is showing me there are some really aggressive attitudes all this decent landlord wants is a decent tenant not much to ask really.
  • Jim640 about 1 month ago
    Whether a property is clean, fit to live in and in good repair should be determined and agreed by the landlord and tenants at the start of the tenancy. This agreed level, whatever it is, should then be maintained by both parties throughout the tenancy with either party able to improve, but not reduce the agreed standard. This approach will allow for people with different standards to live in a property that meets their standards and does not impose lower or higher standards on them. In general, the standard of the property at the start of the tenancy should be the standard to which it is maintained by both parties.
  • Jim640 about 1 month ago
    One of the key issues with tenant damage to a property is the ability to recover the cost after the tenant has left. A tenant facing a large damage bill will often stop paying rent when their tenancy is coming to an end. The bond may cover the rent, but there is then nothing left for the damage. If recovering the cost was made considerably easier it would start to change behaviour. Tenants might be more willing to look after a property of they know they will not escape the damage repair costs by leaving the tenancy. This would lead to better relationships with the owners who would have peace of mind and perhaps more understanding for tenants who want to pay off damage over time.
  • RebeccaPM about 2 months ago
    There should be a mandatory amount of maintenance that a real estate agent can approve for minor maintenance without the landlords approval (i.e air conditioner servicing, leaking taps, overgrown gutters, minor electrical problems) For example a real estate agent should be able to approve up to two weeks rent of maintenance for a property without the owners authority, to allow maintenance to be undertaken in a timely and efficient manner so that tenants are not having to live with these issues until a landlord responds to an agent. Furthermore, a landlord should have a "bond" held in trust for their rental properties equal to four weeks rent, for major repairs - ie, broken hot water systems, air conditioners etc - this would alleviate some of the immediate costs for landlords in the event of an emergency/unexpected repair and make it a quick process for the tenants and the property.
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    • Jim640 about 1 month ago
      Giving real estate agents free reign might seem like a good idea, but it would be very inefficient. A property owner might choose to replace an item that has failed several times rather than having it repaired again. If an agent can just get it repaired again and again, the landlord is being forced to throw good money after bad. I have chosen to replace two air conditioners in my rental property rather than repair them due to their age, but others I have had repaired. An agent wouldn't consider the options in the same way, they would just do what is easiest. The idea of a landlord bond could be good where rogue landlords refuse to maintain their properties properly, but the use of this would have to have rigorous governance to prevent abuse.
  • WarrenStreet about 2 months ago
    . To me this means that the property should be clean enough for a human being to live in and in good repair to me means everything works as it should..lights...air-con..water..gas..heating if these things are provided at the start of a lease.. Managing on going repairs and maintenance should be dealt with within a reasonable time frame of no more than 14 days unless extremely urgent and in which case 24 hrs minimum and give the agent the power to do such repairs not necessarily having to wait to contact the owner first. Dealing with property damage to a rental in Qld..pending the circumstances surrounding how the damage was done and all the factors taken into account, apart from claiming a persons bond and the owner having to sue for further compensation should the tenants repair bill be higher than the bond paid due to the amount of damage..the owner should have suitable insurances in place to cover these things.
    Hide Replies (5)
    • Holmes about 2 months ago
      No, tenant damage should not be claimed on a landlords insurance, that’s the measure of last resort. Tenants Ned to clearly understand they are solely responsible for any damage they or their pets or guests cause. The issue at the moment is it’s too easy for tenants to get out of paying for damage they cause, manny a few that do t care, simply don’t care for he property as they know they can get away with the damage. Time to toughen up on bad tenants.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • Drew85 about 2 months ago
        and reward good tenants :)
      • Satellite about 2 months ago
        Hi HolmesI agree with everything you have stated. Tenants know that they can abscond without paying due rent and leave the property with fixtures not working and property damage which the Landlord must rectify and pay for before renting the property again. This often can take weeks to months with no income. Could someone please do away with the term "wear and tear'. This is so ambiguous and open to abuse by the tenants.
    • foxje about 2 months ago
      Hi WarrenStreet, the current legislation already permits the tenant to pay for urgent repairs and get compensation from the owner, so I would have thought the agent could do similar. If not, then I agree that should be updated. Also, it's hard to select what 'clean enough for a human being to live in'. To be honest, I am a bit of a clean-freak so I make sure my rentals are generally very spotless before renting them out. However, I have a tenant who to me, lives in an absolute pig-sty. I've given him quite a few notices to improve and he generally does (he's a nice old fellow, just a bit different) but it always goes backwards as soon as I've left haha. But if he wants to live that way (assuming no permanent damage is being caused), should I impose my standard on him? People are diverse and live differently. Even things you might take for granted as necessities may not be necessities for everyone, much as we might not like to think that.
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      • Jim640 about 1 month ago
        Hi foxje, The problem with allowing people to live in dirty conditions of their own making is that it can cause damage to the property over time. I work in social housing and we often have tenants that do not clean properly or do not clean at all. When they eventually leave, the dirt sometimes just can't be cleaned away and this leads to additional maintenance costs. Flooring especially often has to be replaced because it can't be cleaned. I think it is reasonable to expect tenants to maintain the property in a clean state and be breached each time it is found to be unreasonably dirty on an inspection. You are doing the right thing and protecting your property by issuing the notices to your tenant. It will also save him money in the long run as he will not be charged for unfair wear and tear.
  • Jim640 about 1 month ago
    A common problem that causes unnecessary damage is tenants failing to report minor problems that then turn into bigger more expensive problems. E.g., a minor leak can be cheap to repair but can result in significant, expensive damage if it goes unreported. Similarly, tenants continuing to use something that has developed a fault or become damaged rather than waiting for it to be fixed can have the same effect. E.g., if a tenant reports a leaking air conditioner, but continues to use it while they are waiting for the technician, this can cause expensive damage to walls and flooring etc. Liability for damage caused by a failure to report or by wilfully using something that is causing damage needs to be made clear in law, with the tenant held responsible if they would have reasonably known the problem existed.
  • Chris Ross about 1 month ago
    Clean = whatever surface is touched does not leave a sticky, dusty residue on your fingersFit to live in = everything works as it shouldIn good repair = nothing needs repairRepairs and maintenance = tenant must take responsibility and write to landlord/agent immediately. it goes without saying that the landlord must act within 7 days to repair and maintain Damage = are we speaking tenant damage? if so, then the tenant must tell the landlord, so that the damage can be fixed at the tenant's cost. Honesty is the key word!
  • Sophie L about 1 month ago
    I don't see how quartely inspections will solve anything based on comments below. If the damage is done and the tenant doesn't care to fix it, it will be too late anyway (costs to be incurred). No wonder so many were speculating on making money off capital gains and left their unit empty. Why take the risk? Unfortunately there are bad tenants ruining it for others and similarly there are landlords trying to rip off tenants. Giving more rights to people like having dogs will only make the issues relating to damage bigger (same with AirBnb). We also simply don't have the same definition of 'clean' and 'wear & tear'. Those need to be clarified. I guess returning in original state when first moved in using photos as evidence could be an option. I did move in a unit that was supposed to be clean and found food in cupboards (in plain view). Real estate agent was a fault on that one. The problem we have these days is a society full of entitled people lacking respect for others and others' property. Not only in the rental industry. In everything. How many people can complain about noisy neighbours? A lot! Someone dropped and broke a jar of tomato sauce in the lift one day and left it there for the cleaners to clean 3 days later... I can easily imagine the state of their unit...
  • ArielCB about 1 month ago
    I have heard a lot about bad tenants who damage property. My response is that quarterly checks should avoid most of this from happening. The R/E or landlord can evict the tenant on these grounds by RTA policy. However, as a tenant of over 20 years with a reputation of always leaving the property in better condition in which I found it - and, of never being even a day late with my rent - I have met just as many bad landlords and real estate agents who breach the rental contract. And, take advantage of tenants who do not know their rights under RTA. The majority of abuses are in relation to maintenance of the property. I am in one such situation at present, and rather than proceed to court on the issue - for fear of R/E reprisal in the form of bad reference for my next property - I have decided to move as soon as the lease is up. This is what most tenants fear, and why they do not take action against R/E and landlords.
  • ArielCB about 1 month ago
    Clean, fit to live in, and in good repair means no rodents, basically clean floors and fittings (stove, cupboards, bathrooms and laundry). But, the most important aspect for a tenant is 'in good repair' - which means that everything works as it should. Especially essential appliances. This includes heating / cooling devices, as well as rainwater tanks and plumbing (which I rate as the worst maintained in rental properties).
  • Darkwing about 1 month ago
    I'm a landlord and find that tribunals are HEAVILY skewed towards the tenants favour. Property managers know this and as a result, do not seem to enforce the terms of the contract which is made fair for both parties. Maintenance of the gardens by way of regular mowing to keep down weed growth is imperative. I have a situation now where improper management of a tenant has resulted and the grass has died off completely in 4 years on a brand new house. How is this not a breech of contract? Maintenance of gardens is in the contract. This will now cost $1000 to repair. I am by no means wealthy....just someone who has taken a risk to better my old age living condition so as not to rely heavily on a pension as an immigrant. What has happened to respect for other's property? Why is it one sided? Please, please, PLEASE make the tenant more liable and accountable for such neg,act.
  • RENTERXYZ about 2 months ago
    The house I am renting was locked by the Property Manager following a perfect inspection. However, it hadn't previously been locked via the deadlocks and neither of them responded to key entries. We were locked out from using one of the doors for weeks on end because he refused to bring the original key to unlock the door. As the Principal of the real estate office, he continued to claim that there was no problem with the locks, even after I had to drive to the office and pay a parking fee, pick up one set of original keys only to find that the specific key was also unreliable. Finally, I refused to return the original key in order to force him to attend the house to check the locks. He eventually ordered a maintenance visit at which time the handyman declared all 3 locks unreliable and replaced them all. Does this mean the rental agreement was broken by the real estate agency at the time of the first notification of our inability to use one of the doors because the lock was inaccessible from the date of the inspection?
  • Satellite about 2 months ago
    The Bond money that tenants have to pay covers loss of rent etc.Either increase this amount to cover ongoing repair and maintenance or add a further Bond to cover this.This might ensure that tenants took greater care and had respect for the property they are renting. These homes are not free to the landlord. Many have gone without luxuries and given up simple pleasures to be able to obtain properties with the hope that they will receive a small income and not have to be reliant on the State Government. I have always tried to be accommodating with tenants. I think a little respect and a grateful attitude from the tenants that a landlord is making a property available to them to live in would be welcome. Unfortunately, this has not been my experience.
  • thedwan about 2 months ago
    Mandatory times for repairs to be done by, with limited exceptions for 'act of god' type events like the 2011 Brisbane Floods, etc.In my experience renting over the years, it seems like landlords / agents just have to acknowledge your request with something as simple as an email/sms message saying "Thanks for letting us know, we'll get it sorted", and then not actually have any sort of timeframe they have to adhere to for a resolution.
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    • Michelle Beavis about 2 months ago
      Thedwan,I know there are some dodgy landlords/ladys and real estates, however what a lot of renters don't seem to realise is that tradespeople can take weeks to get. The general wait for a plumber is 2 weeks for a non-urgent and up to 2 to 3 days for an urgent call out. A lot of times it isn't anyone being tardy or not caring it is because we owners cannot get a tradie there to do the repair. Add to that tenants who want 24 hrs notice for the tradesperson .... blah blah .... and you end up with a situation where the time of repair is exasperated.What a tenant thinks is urgent ie non working stove or oven, a tradesman doesn't consider urgent .... he's looking at urgent gas leaks, and sparking fire hazards.So a little bit of understanding goes a long way in these situations.For the record, as a home owner, with a plumber who looks after my rental and home .... water gushing from the house side of the water main, and me having all water turned off to my house was NOT an urgent repair and took a week to fix.
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      • thedwan about 2 months ago
        I understand what you’re saying, and appreciate that there are always at least two sides to every coin/story.I also appreciate that there are waits for tradespeople who may have urgent gas leaks etc to prioritise first.Those things said, and with all due respect to you, if a burst water main and thus you having to turn off water to a property isn’t an “urgent” job for your plumber, i’d have been calling other plumbers!
  • DebbieP about 2 months ago
    Clean means an improvement cannot be made with cleaning products. Fit to live in means having proper basic facilities such as cooking and bathroom. Good Repair means they are in working order. If the property is being well managed no improvements are needed, educating Landlords about maintaining and repairing properties is needed. Maybe a TICA for properties/landlords that don't do any maintenance, would be a good way for Real Estates to check before they take on a new management that becomes a headache.
  • Holmes about 2 months ago
    Caveat emptor. Let the renter be aware in this case! My daughter leased an older and poorly maintained property in poor condition, it was all she could afford at the time, she paid accordingly and it was her home, she was happy, and it was “fit to live in” for her.. We helped her clean it up to get it liveable and as was negotiated teh landlord paid for agreed materials, a new randehood filter and so on. The net result was she had a home, it was fine to live in and she started on the rental ladder. We would not have rented it. It didn’t meet our standards, so standards and whate “fit to live in” varies between people and the price asked and paid reflects that.In terms of repairs, again we have never ever had an issue, any repairs asked for have been carried out, however. Repairs are already set out in a lease or the act, urgent repairs are also covered. I’m aware some people don’t ask as they fear being kicked out but good tenants find good landlords and it sorts itself out. The only way to assist is have a rapid maintenance complaints service to look at issues promptly, perhaps charge a small lodgement fee and the adjucator has a week to respond, shorter if urgent. The fee is refund e and charged to a he landlord if upheld. BUT, the same applies in reverse if a landlord makes a complaint against a tenant, i.e. if they broke a window and won’t fix it. If damage or neglect is ongoing a landlord needs to be able to evict a tenant quickly, easily and with assistance from a tribunal. It’s not a landlords problem if they have nowhere to go, it’s theirs for not looking after their rental. And, please apply this to ALL public / state housing, get tougher with the Feral tenants.
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    • foxje about 2 months ago
      Hi Holmes, I agree. I rent out a number of units to lower income people including pensioners. The units are not perfect but they are liveable and the tenants are extraordinarily happy to be in somewhere safe and secure that they can call their own. I could renovate the units and improve them but if I did that, I would also charge 50% more rent and the current tenants wouldn't be able to live in them and who knows where they would be able to go. People have different needs and desires. For some people, a place to live is much more important then an air-conditioner or screens on the window (I don't have screens myself as I don't think they are important!). Let's treat people like adults and allow them to discuss and negotiate. Personally I think a lot of the issues raised would be rectified if tenants and landlords were well-informed on their obligations, rights and responsibilities under the current Act!!
    • Cassandra11 about 2 months ago
      Hi Holmes, Agree totally with caveat emptor. I wish it were that easy for good tenants to find good landlords. We lost a lot of money during the GFC in 2008 and were forced to go from owning our own property to renting. We have not yet found that elusive "good landlord". Possibly because most rentals are handled through agencies, whose rental managers are young, inexperienced and quite cocky with all their power (some, not all), making it difficult to actually deal with the landlord. If one has to rent then it is worth continuing the search. Agree also that there are some very bad tenants out there, who need to be dealt with in a more timely manner by managing agents, who often let things slide by not carrying out proper inspections.
  • Maggie Rose about 2 months ago
    The agent in Palm Beach was all smiles until one signed the lease. Legitimate complaints were a no no. Domestic violence neighbors and a mentally ill female. The rental was a nightmare.. The Domestic Violence. couple in their 50’s were nonstop. . Police visited eight times in as many months.The agent’s attitude was ‘we didn’t hear it, so it didn’t happen’ – whatever happened to ‘quite enjoyment’ ? Repairs were delayed. (eight months to replace a screen door that had no hinges rusted worn and in the hottest months) The agent sent emails constantly ( harassing for rent) which was always paid on the due date through Bank transfer. I contacted the RTA who reassured my method of paying (electronically) was legal. Tenants trash piled up at the front of the property. Urine stained mattresses’, rusty washing machine/ fridge and empty beer cans, junk chucked on top. The property looked an absolute eyesore and this was all due to two Tenants,. a couple in their 50’s there was only three units in this location all ground floor level;When I challenged the Agent’s manager that / they and the owner let this property knowing the Tenants were a domestic violence couple ….of course their denials were hollow. I sought and eventually successfully secured a ‘break in my 12 month lease’ with no penalties. However the financial cost of moving was hefty, A $30 increase in rent per week was levied on the new tenant (s) (The Commonwealth Games were a month away) and of course no mentions of the violent drunken behavior of the pair in unit 1 or the daily mental disturbed woman in unit 3It should be a requirement of Agents and Owners to divulge BAD tenant (s) behavior. Agents and Owners need look and see where the wages and profits enable them to be in business, from the TENANTS
  • CNielsen about 2 months ago
    Clean means Clean, no muck and grime.. No rejected because it hasn't been scrubbed.
  • homely about 2 months ago
    "CLEAN" means the absence of dust, dirt, cobwebs, insects and their droppings, grease (kitchen/oven/stove), streaky glass and mirrors including windows (inside, and out where possible), sliding door tracks and no sludge/mould/stains left around bathroom taps and toilets (only caused when not cleaned weekly)."FIT TO LIVE IN" means being able to live comfortably without any extra care required eg. avoiding leaky roofs, having to plug under doorways to stop excessive draughts, having sufficient lighting and ventilation, and everything listed under "in good repair "."IN GOOD REPAIR" means everything functioning as designed, eg. electrical (lights/powerpoints/stoves/ovens/ceiling fans and A/C), plumbing (toilets/drains/pipes/taps), and the hot water system. Safe steps, secure railings etc.All of the above should be noted on both the Entry and Exit Condition Reports, which, ideally, should be done by both the tenant and the agent/landlord at the same time. I believe photos taken on the day moving in, are critical for both parties, and copies given to the other party, for later reference.
  • smokey about 2 months ago
    Damage to property happens for many varied reasons.A good working relationship with the owner/provider is a key preventative and responsible approach and is more likely to benefit both parties.Conversely an adversarial mistrustful dictatorial is destructive and harmful for both parties.
  • smokey about 2 months ago
    Where tenants are being charged rental for furniture and appliances that 1. the repair and replace be done at least to the same standard, not used as an excuse to lower quality. 2. where such rental charges are added to the property 25% it is not automatically calculated at the maximum amount without providing the reason for the calculation and options available.3. where an Appliance has proved dangerously faulty several times without a warning of any kind. just again a simple repair and now it's working is not good enough. Again Access Community Housing Cairns
  • Nivannii about 2 months ago
    It means the landlord/lady would be happy to live there!! Everything supplied needs to be in good working order and clearly stated if the maintenance is the owner's or tenant's. If the owner's then a schedule for when maintenance is happening upon signing of the lease. Tenant needs to let owner's know within 24 hours of any repair or maintenance needed outside of the scheduled ones.Unless very major, within a week, owner's need to inform tenants of date for the repairs and maintenance.I get really upset when I see on TV the damage some tenants do. I am such a responsible tenant yet as a single older person with pets I find it difficult to find an affordable well kept rental. I love the property as my own so when I see this I believe it's criminal and needs to be a chargeable offense.Even if they haven't damaged property yet have left piles of rubbish and the place in disarray it still needs to be criminal. There are so many people wishing they could have a home to rent and then we see these people who so disrespect what they have.Where I am now there is no care from the other tenants. There's 5 bedrooms downstairs and they are rented out separately so no cohesion on tenants. I instigated a house meeting with landlady who lives in two bedroom self contained upstairs with one tenant. At least a cleaner was hired to do a good clean. Landlady asked me to do up a roster (I seem to be the only one including her that has my head around clean) which I did explaining what needed to be done in each section. This was over 6 weeks ago which was when the cleaner finished. I am the only one that has done any cleaning since. The landlady knows I'm looking elsewhere however with two small dogs I'm finding this difficult. I'm very grateful I have my own ensuite, kitchen plates, cutlery and appliances.The property has building materials stacked up all around the house, these a shipping container, shed and something huge under a tarp at the back of the yard (suburban Gold Coast) which we can't see as there's this big hill of dirt with overgrown grass in the way. This came from the front of the yard when it was renovated and she built upstairs. There's no maintenance that happens here not even the spa. I have cleaned the gutters down here however the top ones are growing plants out of them so just dumping extra water on the gutters down here. I've cleaned up the drains all around the property as well so that the water has somewhere to go. I find it hard to comprehend why someone who owns so much has so little care and respect for it.
  • mary2018 about 2 months ago
    at the moment I live in a very run down house the bathroom needs replacing the veranda is rotting windows are leaking when it rains the front and back door has big gaps in it I feel why should I replace all this when I could be evicted once this house is sold
  • Evelynne about 2 months ago
    One persons Clean, Fit To Live In and In Good Repair may be another persons Not Clean Enough, Barely Fit To Live In and In Debatable Good Repair. Units I have leased appeared clean superficially. However on closer inspection they were not clean enough to my standards eg cockroach dirt in cupboards and stained toilet bowls.Fit To Live In may mean a guaranteed supply of power and water to the building but not the condition of old and failing electrical wiring, power points and water pipes which then come under the heading of maintenance. After signing the lease agreement it is then the responsibility of the tenant to notify the property manager, request repairs and deal with work orders and trades people. In this respect the tenant is working on behalf of tne agency and owner but not paying the cost . I have found this method to be successful. It is a matter of give and take to benefit all parties.In Good Repair may mean kitchen cupboads that are standing and useable but badly water damaged and therefore according to my standards in unhealthy condition to store food and utensils. Willful damage to a rental property by a tenant or visitor should be dealt with in a court of law. Accidental damage to a rental property by a tenant or visitor might be (according to the circumstances) negotiable with the owner or repaired by the tenant at the tenants cost.. Damage caused by issues beyond the control of the tenant eg storm might be covered by Landlord Insurance. Negotiations between all parties is the key to improvement.
  • Gerry about 2 months ago
    This is all about attitude. Of course you need to keep your rental clean, tidy, treat it like your own home.We, as tenants, need to contribute in maintenance, like changing light globes, and cleaning out drains of your sinks etc.In the place I rent the previous tenant cut through the downpipes with their whipper snipper. So, a plumber has to fix it? No, a bit of care would avoid this damage.Tenancy should be a partnership in which the tenant respects the property and the landlord respect the tenants.
  • Elle about 2 months ago
    I have high expectations as I have rented for the last 20 years.I want my new rental to be pretty much spotless, as it is now required by lessor, even after a 10 year lease. Lessors should sometimes have mandatory guidelines in relation to time frames versus wear and tear i.e when to repaint/ update flooring etc
  • Veritas about 2 months ago
    Clean and fit...When you are a prospective tenant you might have 10 mins to inspect a property and decide to apply. Then you turn up on move in day and discover the condition is less than perfect. Subsequently you have the property manager telling you it’s ok and disagreeing with your condition report. While this is happening you know full well the same PM will ream you royally when you move out... What’s required is an independent arbitrator. I am sick of having my bond monies tied up while I dispute with a PM. Too one sided, asymmetrical power relationships.
  • Brisbanerenting about 2 months ago
    Some Property Managers work purely for the owners. I had to vacate a property on the advice of the RTA as the premises became unlivable. How do we get the industry to make property managers and owners accountable. My unit actually had water running out of light fittings then saturating the carpet every time it rained. I had to move my clothes into the spare bedroom to keep them dry. Agent did nothing.
  • Catherine Franklin about 2 months ago
    Clean and Fit to live in what a joke. Real estates need to make sure that the property was cleaned to a standard from the last tenant. I have moved into house where the house was in a terrible state. Their is no way it had a bond clean or carpets clean. I have asked the real estate for repairs and filled in the inspection form for them and nothing, not even a E mail saying the owners aren't going to fix them . Not sure who is not doing the right thing. Owners or real estate? I had to take this house as I had no choice. After I clean it myself its liveable.
  • Signee about 2 months ago
    Real Estates are renowned for producing a "squeaky clean" Entry Report for completion by tenants. I remember one house I rented, the Entry Report for the stove stated "Clean, Working, In Good Order & Condition". That statement could not have been further from the truth. The stove was absolutely filthy.....it was appalling. I took photos and showed them to the Real Estate, in conjunction with their Entry Report, and they just snubbed their noses at it .... told me to stop whinging and go back an clean it myself. Why wasn't the previous tenant made to clean it, or have part of their bond withheld? Why didn't the Real Estate take action to arrange professional cleaners ?? I'll tell you why ..... because THEY would have had to foot the bill after already releasing the previous tenant of any further responsibility concerning that house. Real Estates also don't appear to care about their responsibility regarding repairs and maintenance, They arrive to carry out their 3-monthly inspection, get us as the tenants to fill out documents showing what repairs need to be done.... But these documents seem to be conveniently "lost" in their office, because the work NEVER gets done unless we jump up and down!!!! Very, very frustrated!!!
  • Chris Barker about 2 months ago
    I am a landlord and pride myself on having clean, serviceable properties with all appliances in working order.There are already mandatory testing regimes for some services and minimum standards would assist, as would having maximum repair times.
  • Cassandra11 about 2 months ago
    Properties should be free of mould, inground dirt, heavy stains on carpets or in bathrooms, walls should be clean, as should carpets (and they should not smell). Ceilings should not be flaking paint or showing signs of water incursion. Yards and gardens should be well cared for and garages should have doors in good working order (and not fall off, almost taking my husband's arm with it, as happened with our recent rental). Curtains and blinds should be clean, or totally removed; and drains should not smell bad. Taps should not leak, and stoves, ovens, other appliances included in the rental should be spotless and in good working order. Trees on the property should be trimmed and safe, and roofs should be in good repair, not leaking. We have recently been shown premises whose roofs leaked like sieves so that the front and back vernadahs could not be used for living spaces and were useless; where door and window frames were so affected by rain incursion that in wet weather, they were extremely difficult to open due to swelling of the timber. Managing Agents should be much more proactive in noting what repairs were necessary, and how urgent, and be empowered to get these done in a timely manner, without having to negotiate with landlords who are often difficult to contact. Tenants who cause damage to properties should be identified quickly by Managing Agents who should be undertaking necessary inspections, and dealt with under existing laws, up to and including court proceedings. Penalties for this type of damage may need to be strengthened in current laws.
  • ahl about 2 months ago
    There's a wide variety of properties for rent at a wide range of rents. The state of a property is usually visible when inspected by tenants and it's their choice to rent or not depending on what they want. If the tenants find something unsafe or not initially visible after moving in they need to bring it to the agents attention. Owners rarely get to see their properties and are pretty reliant on tenants and agents advice. Most owners want to keep their properties in good condition.With the best of intentions it can sometimes be difficult to get things fixed properly and in a timely manner, due to things like access, inconvenience to tenants, the amount of work required to properly fix an issue, poor contractors, having to wait for good contractors, wanting to fix something properly rather than "band aid it" continually. It is no different from issues that owner-occupiers have to deal with in their own homes - but with a couple of third parties who have to be worked with. It is best if owners and tenants are able to work together if something problematic "crop ups" unscheduled. A good, well trained agent helps this to happen.
  • Jeanie about 2 months ago
    I had tenants that had a pet bird in a cage that was placed near the glass sliding back door. Feathers from the bird dropped into the tracks for the sliding door. The door became so difficult to slide the tenant broke the handle. The tenant did not clean the tracks of feathers and any other dirt to maintain an easy to slide door. This was the condition of the door when they started the lease - easy to slide. As owners we replaced the door. However, I was extremely cross at both the agent (for not instructing the tenants to maintain the door) and the tenants for not keeping it clean. Even though it was not my responsibility I did replace the door. In my opinion, the tenant is required to keep the tracks clean.
  • Jodie1 about 2 months ago
    A property and its inclusions should be functional and safe. If it doesn't work it should be removed or replaced, eg: don't leave an old air conditioner in the property that doesn't work or an old fridge that is on its way out and say "as soon as it break's the landlord isn't replacing it". This doesn't mean everything needs be new or perfect but they must be fit for purpose. Seems quite simple to me. I think the problem is that the legislation enforceability needs to be more "user friendly". Unfortunately the system to enforce the legislation lets everyone down. It's too hard for anyone to pursue anything that is unfair: eg: not able to hang pictures or tenant not paying water invoices. If is a bad tenant or bad landlord, its too hard for the good tenant/owner make them do the right thing. The right thing already exists in the legislation, but making the tenant/landlord do it, is a major feat, a ridiculously long process and a gamble at best. RTA resolution service is of no help and they are inconsistent. Make the enforcement process available, efficient and consistent. Then the property industry will work better.