Applications

by Beebs, 13 days ago
The Open Doors to Renting Reform community consultation has now closed. Thank you for having your say on how we can improve renting in Queensland.

We want to know:

  • What information do property managers and owners need to make an informed decision about a prospective tenant?
  • What information do tenants think is reasonable to provide when applying for a rental property?
  • Should the application process be more regulated, such as through standard application forms or which identify/limit what information prospective tenants can be asked for?

The Open Doors to Renting Reform community consultation has now closed. Thank you for having your say on how we can improve renting in Queensland.

  • Veritas 16 days ago
    Property managers take a lot of personal and sensitive information, photocopy the source documents and dongod knows what with this information afterwards. I also find the work referee requirement particularly invasive and humiliating. Why should a property manager be able to demand this? This level of intrusion does nothing to limit the owners loss.
    Hide Replies (13)
    • Carol456 16 days ago
      Also a lot of property managers are young and don’t know the meaning of confidentiality to do with your personal information.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
        Yes agreed, Property Management is low profit and labour intensive. Many Agents expect far too much from young and under trained staff.
        Hide reply (1)
        • Kat YS 13 days ago
          It does seem in like this is the case with some agencies. I had the experience of having to point out multiple errors (start dates, bond amount, utilities connection details) in tenancy forms prepared by an agent before signing it. We've also found some agents are extremely difficult to just get into contact with at all! It seems some staff are being loaded up with an excessive number of properties and it shows in the quality of the service they can then provide, even if they're trying their best.
    • matt88 15 days ago
      How they handle this information is also very important. They demand everything one would need to commit identity theft, yet there are no regulations on how they must protect this information and no accountability if they fail to.
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      If you are approved and move in your application is trashed after 12 months of vacating. If you do not get the property I would not keep the application unless I thought I had another property coming up soon that might suit you. Otherwise I would drown under a sea of paper! Frankly Agents are not even remotely interested in your identity or what you spend you money on. They are doing the job they are paid to do and following Best Practice guidelines to mitigate loss. They are far too busy to even bother about this "sensitive" information unless it is pertinent to the tenancy.
      Hide Replies (4)
      • Carol456 15 days ago
        Claire you may not be interested in what your tenants spend there money on but I have had a young and impertinent agent who made comments to myself about what I was spending my money on. These comments usually come from previous experience with agents. Maybe you are one of the ones that are not interested but trust me they are out there and quiet frankly it is none of there business.
        Hide reply (1)
        • Claire Thompson 14 days ago
          That is absolutely disgraceful and unprofessional. Complain to the business owner at once! I am so sorry this has happened to you,
      • LouLou 15 days ago
        If you are not interested in the identity or what the person spends money on, why ask for such information? Mitigating loss for whom, the tenant, the agent or property owner? Where is the accountability on how sensitive or personal information is handled?Agents and their businesses should be subject to rigorous audits to ensure quality and compliance against the legislative requirements such as the Property Agents and Motor Dealers Act 2000, Competition and Consumer Act 2010 and the Privacy Act 1988. It would appear that if you are not interested in change why stay in the industry?
        Hide reply (1)
        • Claire Thompson 14 days ago
          I can assure you Agents are most definitely under intense scrutiny and pay dearly for the privilege of working in the property industry. I doubt any other industry is as strictly regulated with the possible exceptions of medicine and the legal profession. That is because an Agent has a fiduciary duty to their Client (monetary). Of course it is essential to establish the identity of a person moving into a property. What I am trying to say is that they are doing a professional job and must act in the interest of their owners. They do not and should not have any personal interest in the information requested other than to ascertain the facts and assess risk. I must and do comply with all requirements of the many pieces of legislation affecting me and my business and am continually updating and staying abreast of those changes. That is what I get paid for.In the case of failing to follow Best Practice and legislative requirements I am leaving myself open to litigation. A bond of the equivalent of 4 weeks rent is totally inadequate if the tenant is a bad one. Yes Owners should have insurance but there is always a time delay and many items are not covered especially lost rent. Very few owners are these "rich people" many tenants assume they are. They are mostly normal people just like you and me who may have many an reasons for renting out a property.
    • LouLou 15 days ago
      You have to ask yourself whether the legislation such as the 'property agents and motor dealers Act 2000' may need to be reviewed, to ensure consistency across business operations.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • Claire Thompson 14 days ago
        It is, frequently.
      • LouLou 14 days ago
        The Property Agents and Motor Dealers Act 2000 appears to have been amended in 2006.
    • Roxanne#1 15 days ago
      Dear Veritas, The reason Property Managers and Owners need information is because they are renting you a valuable asset worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. They need to make sure you can afford the rent so they need to contact your work references. This is critical to helping the Owner decide if you are the right tenant for the property. Cheers, Roxanne
  • Judith Jeffs 19 days ago
    The application process can be very long if you are rejected many times by either the agent or the landlord. Having to fill in forms over a period of weeks or months is time-consuming. If there was a regulated form it could be saved and used until successful. Are there regulations about what information is shared by the agent to the landlord? Or does the landlord take the agent's recommendations, chose by "name" or other ways?
    Hide Replies (8)
    • Anthony Trudgen 18 days ago
      standardization of applications would be great! you could then apply easily at inspections.
    • cclark 16 days ago
      I think a standardised application is much needed. The 100 points of ID required is highly inconsistent even within the same real estate, depending on what office the property is rented from. I also agree that greater transparency is needed as to how the information on the application is handled, who has access to it, and how long it is stored for by the agent, etc.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • kwil 15 days ago
        Yes! I had an application which listed 2 different definitions for 100 points of ID. And when we submitted it, the agent had a third definition. This is something that needs to be properly defined. And I agree greater transparency/regulations about on how this information is stored and destroyed is required.
      • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
        The requirements for privacy and how long things must be stored is legislated. It is not up to the Agent
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      Many Agents now use 1form through realestate.com.au. You only have to upload your details once.The Agent must follow their owners instructions. If they have a good relationship the Owner will often follow their Agents advice. If you are getting lots of knockbacks check you are supplying the right information and can afford the property you are applying for.
      Hide Replies (3)
      • Ehm 14 days ago
        Maybe the RTA needs to be the custodian of 1form rather than a private company, to allow all lessors the ability to use the same information and for it not to exist as part of a for-profit entity?
        Hide reply (1)
        • Claire Thompson 13 days ago
          If we lived in a totalitarian regime. There is a question of copyright. Why would you want all lessors the ability to see your information? Personally after 28 years of experience in the Industry I find it a very helpful tool for both the Agency and the tenant is a lot more efficient, quick and environmentally friendly that a truckload of paper applications.There is already way too much Government in every aspect of our lives. How about some common sense ?
      • Kat YS 13 days ago
        Which would be great except... that requires applicants to take the risk of give a very large amount of sensitive identity and financial information to a third party company with no guarantee that information will be kept secure and won't be passed on for advertising purposes.
  • Kat YS 13 days ago
    More standardised application processes would definitely be a good idea! Some application processes currently ask for a huge amount of detailed information and back up documentation, and no two forms are the same. This can mean prospective tenants pouring hours or even days worth of work into each application, often racing to complete forms for half a dozen properties at a time because the market is so competitive for renters. The only alternative for many properties currently is a commercially operated online platform which, while it can save some time in pre-filling application forms, also requires you to submit ALL your personal information through a very insecurely set up online portal, exposing applicants to serious privacy and data security risks. A standardised application form, with space for any extra specialised enquires, or at least some limits on what can be asked, would go a long way to ameliorating this situation. The RTA already provides standardised forms for other tenancy matters so adding one for rental applications seems not too much to ask. Another issue is with regards to guarantors. Where agents/property owners require or are willing to accept a financial guarantor to backup the applicants's ability to keep up rent payments, there should be a standard form to document this, which lessors are required to accept. Again, this could easily be provided as pdf formm via the RTA. Requiring a guarantor to instead fill out a full separate application form with all the personal details involved is unreasonable. All that should be required is evidence of their ID, income/assets and willingness to stand as guarantor.
  • SiFa 13 days ago
    If the tenant is reliable with their payments and they keep the property clean. Tenants should provide the number of people is to live in the property and their income. I think personal information should be the limit.
  • LeeStav 15 days ago
    The landlord should be made to provide the same sort of information as the tenant, as well as things like maintenance and repair history, rental increases over what periods, number of tenants they have rented the property to, investigations or any notices to remedy breaches. As a tenant, you are locked into an contract with a person you know absolutely nothing about yet they have access to your financial situation and rental history. Tenants should be able to see what kind of person they are renting from before getting locked into something they can't get out of.
    Hide Replies (11)
    • Mark and Robyn 15 days ago
      When you use a property manager this is highly unlikely to be made available to prospective tenants.
      Hide Replies (9)
      • LeeStav 15 days ago
        That is exactly the problem. Landlords can hide behind property managers. Property managers get paid by the landlord and don't care about the tenants. Property managers should have to provide their history also. There should perhaps be a rental database that everyone can access for this type of information, even though that will never happen, especially if it's a government department that has to maintain it.
        Hide Replies (8)
        • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
          Check Google reviews. Agents have so many laws to comply with that you are well and truly protected. RTA are very helpful. There are plenty of laws strongly in your favour. You can also approach Fair Trading who govern the legislation.
          Hide Replies (7)
          • LeeStav 15 days ago
            Well I had a landlord and agent change my lease agreement without telling me (inserting a different page AFTER I had signed it and when I moved out, no exit report was sent. I approached both the RTA and the Office of Fair Trading as the agent has tried to hit me with a lot of costs that were over and above what was fair, as well as claim for the full amount of my bond, yet both agencies did nothing, saying it was out of their scope so forgive me if I have no faith in either of those organisations. 8 months down the track and I am still fighting for my bond. It's only because I have complained a lot that a second hearing date is set for January instead of May next year. Both the landlord and the agent have lied to the RTA and QCAT. Your comment on there being plenty of laws strongly in my favour don't work when people lie and cheat.
            Hide Replies (3)
            • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
              Did you complete an Exit Report yourself? Were you present at the Bond Inspection? and did you take photos when you moved in? Did you return your Entry Condition Report within 3 days and get a copy? Is it possible you mislaid your lease or "lost" a page? - I know many of my tenants have in the past that is why I give them a high quality folder with all documentation and make sure they initial everything and I also have a copy. Then I also email them everything in PDF so nothing can be changed. Sorry but your story doesn't ring true. , Did you owe rent when you left? Was there any damage? There is nearly always two sides to these kind of stories.
              Hide Replies (2)
              • LeeStav 14 days ago
                Claire Thompson - you know nothing about my situation and your nasty comment about my story not ringing true was unfounded and unwarranted. Perhaps just stick to commenting on the questions asked for the forum instead of putting your 2 cents worth into matters you know nothing about.
                Hide reply (1)
                • Claire Thompson 13 days ago
                  Interesting response!
          • LBPM 15 days ago
            Claire Thompson - Google review is only there for the keyboard warriors that have no guts to take the matter to QCAT. Google reviews are generally made by poor quality verbose tenants that have too much time on their hands. Or landlords that have disagreed with agent methods thinking their houses are mansions - so this comment is totally irrelevant.
            Hide Replies (2)
            • LouLou 15 days ago
              Google reviews are honest and helps to assist others in making decisions as to whether they should use your services or not. It appears you may be out of touch with your client base.
            • Talon 15 days ago
              Would you like to discuss that view with my property managers? They would be interested to know why you feel I am a poor quality tenant who is always paid in advance with rent, looks after the property, feels genuinely privileged to be here and feels their service is so exceptional that I was compelled to publicise what a great job they do. It goes both ways. Funnily when I went to leave feedback I saw other tenants and owners were saying the same thing I was.
    • LouLou 15 days ago
      Exactly, I just left a property I was renting for 30 months as the owner wanted to do short term rentals, however after 12 months of emailing with a list of repairs and maintenance such as mould on ceiling through a structural roof problem, leaking internal and external taps, rotten deck boards, it was found by the builder who eventually came out to do repairs that the brackets holding the first floor deck and roof had rusted and a deck upright had rotted to the extent it was dangerous to walk on. In the meantime our rent was put up to 20 per week to pay for repairs and maintenance and we were paying a premium rental price. If the deck and roof collapsed the owner would of been up for 600,000 at a minimum in damages, reported to WHS. What were my options, breach notice to the owner or move out. Hmmm, we looked after and cared for the property and invested a lot of rental money. There are other horror stories out there of what tenants have to put up with by reluctant, property managers and owners who do not want to spend the money on ensuring their investment property is suitable for habitation. Property managers and owners should be made accountable, perhaps hefty fines or imprisonment for placing tenants in unsafe and unhealthy positions might drive the message home.
  • Garry Wells 13 days ago
    Rent being paid on time, standard application form, explained thoroughly. with incorrect info supplied by PMs, pushing their own agendas
  • guyfaulks 15 days ago
    This is so hard as bad tenants have all the tricks to pull under the sun to obtain a property. Obviously references are useless and once these people gain access to your house, it is a nightmare to get them out. There is nowhere for a landlord to go for help. The RTA are no help and if they go to Tenants Qld they will protect these bad tenants every step of the way.
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    • Ehm 14 days ago
      It's ironic, bad tenants can get away with stuff but good tenants feel like criminals applying.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Claire Thompson 13 days ago
        You should never be made to feel like a "criminal". Important not to take questions personally. Many of them are legally necessary and insurance requirements, Try talking to the PM. They are people too & probably also tenants themselves.
    • Claire Thompson 13 days ago
      May I suggest you find an Agent who is very good at their job? For a very small amount of money that is fully tax deductable you can avoid a whole lot of trouble.
  • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
    We need adequate identification to ensure we are talking to the actual applicant with enough information to do a Tenancy Database Search. I always prefer to meet the applicant face to face. A lot can be determined by a personal conversation. It is important that the prospective tenant/s can AFFORD the rent. As a rule of thumb I would be very reluctant to rent a property that is more than 1/3 of a tenants income. WE need rental or residential information about previous properties the tenant has lived in. Big gaps in their story can mean big trouble. It is also important to determine if they are suitable for the property. For example I would not rent a 2 bedroom unit to a family of five. However most importantly I have to follow my Owners instructions.
    Hide Replies (2)
    • Ehm 14 days ago
      I'm not sure how feasible the 1/3 of income is going to be in the future; I'm an experienced white collar degree qualified professional and I only just scrape in to 1/3 of income. The cost of living has increased way out of line with wage growth. I see your point though, just worry how I will ever keep finding places to live as my wage goes up at 1/10th the speed of rental prices. And I can't do the share house thing. Maybe caravan park in the future.
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      • Claire Thompson 13 days ago
        HI Ehm , Yes you are not alone. It is only a guide. You have to look at the individual person & the overall picture and their history of reliability. A sensible PM will always use discretion and advise owner accordingly. Rents are pretty stable in my part of the world & I manage properties in a 30 km radius of my office. Perhaps you might like to consider a less expensive suburb? Or consider a smaller agency where there is individual service. Where you are treated like a person of value not just a number. (My personal business model) I hope you find a great solution for your situation. Kind regards
  • Levifold 14 days ago
    Yes application identification info should be regulated. A standardised form for all real estates and private rentals should be put in place.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Ehm 14 days ago
      Yep easy way to steal someone's identity would be to actually or pretend to be a landlord. I feel like I'm being violated when I apply for a property. As others have said, you have to provide less information for other things.
  • Kaye Thomas 14 days ago
    no of people to be in house, earnings per house, rental history, wage records, time frame needed
  • Kaye Thomas 14 days ago
    Job history no of people to be in the house earnings, term required, references rental history.
  • DebbieP 14 days ago
    If you use 1Form it is already a standard form that can be used across many real estate agents and save info so it isn't as hard when applying for properties. An agent and a Landlord need to know if the tenant can afford the property and care for the property and the questions on the applications go towards answering these questions. I wouldn't agree to a regulated form if it takes out the questions that are needed by a Landlord to make an informed decision on tenant selection.
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    • Csnake 14 days ago
      Debbie and Roxanne, I agree that an owner needs to know if the tenant will be able to upkeep their end of the rental agreement by showing their income and rental history. It would be great for tenants to be able to view the rental history of homes as well in terms of tenants reasons for leaving and terms of lease. I have had a number of rentals through property management groups where the owner decided to leave the property group before the end of the lease, leaving me to deal with the owner directly. This generally left me with issues in the house (such as leaking taps, broken stairs and when I lived near the ocean, HUGE mold issues) that were never resolved. Why they were not resolved I cannot say, it could have been too costly or overwhelming for the owner, but I would have loved to leave a warning to future tenants of my experience to save them the drama and health risks. I am a big fan of 1Form! It makes applications much easier and allows tenants to follow the process of their applications. What I would love to see added is a tenant review of properties, so maybe the properties have accounts/profiles on 1Form as well that reviews and tenant histories can be stored in for public view (or 1Form account holders to view).I respect that home owners are risking their property to have renters, and detailed background information helps to pick the tenants whos integrity matches the owners expectation. But tenants also run at a risk of sometimes being lulled into a false sense of security with how the property they are moving into will be managed. Tenants should be able to make informed decisions based on the properties management and tenant history.
  • Cathe_78 20 days ago
    I've had to provide less information when applying for a passport or a bank loan than I do when applying for a rental property.
    Hide Replies (23)
    • Pam4 17 days ago
      When you rent a property you are being entrusted with an asset worth hundreds of thousands of dollars and the owners credit rating and ability to pay their loans is dependent on you meeting your obligations. I don't think it is too much for a lessor agent to get a lot of information from you.
      Hide Replies (14)
      • Kpsubs 16 days ago
        Pam4,I appreciate you have an asset worth a lot of money. You have chosen to invest in proptery for its yield. This is not risk free. I understand that you don’t want your investment trashed. With more than 34% of Qlders renting, it is highly likely that you will have good tenants and, in the case of not, there is insurance tomitigste the risk. I have rented for about 20 years. It is a lifestyle choice. It hasn’t been until I arrived in Qld that I have had to provide so much information about myself with not knowing where this info goes and who sees it. It is more than enough for identity fraud. People renting want to have a roof over their head. They want to make the place their home. If you approach your property rental from this perspective, I think you will find a match between your aspirations and a tenants. The more landlords see tenants as thieving, conniving and somehow out to turn the property to rubble the more those people will arrive. This is not the majority. The laws have to be created to serve the majority not penailse the majority to deal with a minority. Probably not a popular response with you.... my posts haven’t always gone down well with landlords
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Therose 16 days ago
          Here here. Agree
        • LouLou 15 days ago
          I agree.
      • Talon 15 days ago
        If the owner's ability to pay their loans is dependent on the tenant then the owner should find a more suitable investment opportunity. renting should be a win/win situation, not a "I'll use you to pay for my house and then treat you like dirt if you want anything fixed" situation, which is common. The problem here is agents and owners seeing tenants as wallets and not actual people. The interesting part is when an owner was a tenant or has become one again, totally different attitude and really great to rent from.
        Hide Replies (10)
        • Fast Eddy 15 days ago
          Hi Talon. I wish it was easy to find tradies to do maintenance.Online now it all goes to hipages and airtasker. Lots of these people are not QBCC licenced tradies. It can take days to get someone to quote, come out and repair and as soon as you mention it’s a rental property and u have to get permission to enter,the Form 9 etc some tradies lose interest straight away. They say how they’ve got to a house and the tenant hasn’t let them in. Or they have a story about how long it took to get paid through the agency. Some tradies will tell u how they did this work for a while and got sick of the rigmarole and just wont do it anymore. Just to let u know that the best efforts can be made but this can be why it can take a while to find a tradie to do this type of work. Not to mention the prices, if you want quotes cause it’s a big jobthen you will risk complaints from tenant of invasion of privacy. I hope u can see this from the owners perspective,the process is long. This is why many owners will opt to have a property vacant for a bit of time to do maintenance
          Hide Replies (3)
          • Talon 15 days ago
            Eddy absolutely. I understand what you are saying and that would be frustrating. In my experience maintenance is just not done at all. There is no attempt. I used to work for a property maintenance business who serviced many different real estates in Brisbane. I heard the same story from tenants that I experienced myself, reporting maintenance issues for months with no response at all. I have never had the experience, in 20 years, of an owner wanting to upkeep the property. I know it would happen, somewhere, but as a disadvantaged person I have not seen it.
            Hide Replies (2)
            • Robyn Hartley 14 days ago
              I have had repair issues that were not forwarded to me and have lost out due to appliances being out of extended warranty. I think it is a good idea that both the PM and the owner are notified about issues. I have also had to pick up dog poo (3/4s of a wheely bin) after the tenant has moved out. PM obviously not doing thorough inspections, same tenants had sheep in the yard who ate all my plants among other damage in the house. Maybe owners could do inspections too?
              Hide reply (1)
              • Talon 14 days ago
                Robyn owners can do the inspections! They are always welcome to accompany the PM to routine inspections, most just don't because they are either out of state or just lazy. I would love to meet the person who owns the property I rent so I can say thank you. I don't understand why owners make no effort to meet the people living in their property. They would also see what state it is in for themselves and no rely on someone who wants to play both sides against each other (PM). If I had such a huge amount of money i was essentially lending to someone to look after, I sure would want to meet them.
        • LouLou 15 days ago
          You are absolutely correct.
        • Roxanne#1 15 days ago
          Dear Talon, If all Owners who rely upon rent to pay their loans withdrew from the REntal market there would be less than 15% of the population renting because rental properties would not be available! You are the one who said "I'll use you to pay for my house and then treat you like dirt if you want anything fixed" Not the Owners here. That is in your mind. If you don't like that you can work on it. Cheers, Roxane
          Hide Replies (4)
          • Talon 15 days ago
            Roxanne that is simply the attitude I have faced as a renter for decades, as well as what I have seen in these forums and what I have seen owners say elsewhere. I would prefer people to have respect for each other. The ridiculous threat of people withdrawing from the market is just that, ridiculous. It often only occurs when their homes are repossessed due to being irresponsible or they have a very bad tenant who completely destroys the house. Both issues should be look at. Neither are the majority.
            Hide Replies (3)
            • Roxanne#1 14 days ago
              Dear Talon, I doubt you know as many Owners as I do. I am going to sell 2 or 3 out of 5 rental properties depending upon how bad the legislation is. You have very little understanding of rental markets. The more respect you the more respect you will get. Making sweeping generalisations about how bad Owners and Agents are does nothing to further this discussion. There are Good Owners, same as there are Good Tenants. Wonder why you don't seem to meet any. Cheers, Roxanne
              Hide Replies (2)
              • Talon 14 days ago
                Roxanne you clearly enjoy trolling and would be pretty good at it with someone less intelligent I am sure. Equal respect is a very rare thing in renting, which you would know if you had experience. You can be the best tenant someone could ask for, and it means nothing. There are some great owners and tenants out there, but they very rarely seem to cross paths. From spending a lot of my spare time in forums where owners and tenants are requesting help, I have seen a wide range of issues and the huge gap between renting and owning. This is Qld, and if you knew how renting works in this state you would be aware that tenants are not given the option to speak to the owner, unless they rent directly.
                Hide reply (1)
                • Roxanne#1 14 days ago
                  Dear Talon, LOL! Like you are not trolling? You make so many generalisations: " Equal respect is a very rare thing in renting" " You can be the best tenant someone could ask for, and it means nothing. " If that is your experience there may be a reason for it. Reflect on your attitudes and behaviour. And oh, by the way, I am 66 years old, and living in Queensland since 1967. I hope that meets your stringent requirements to post on this blog! And thanks, people like you have convinced me to sell my rental properties. I will sell 2 or 3 out of 5 properties and other Owners will follow suit if changes are made that do not consider the needs of Owners, as you obviously do not. Cheers, Roxanne
    • Fast Eddy 15 days ago
      Hi Cathe the problem is that when you get that one unlucky situation where the checks haven’t been thorough and the tenant doesn’t pay their rent , and leaves the property with a heap of furniture in it on interest free purchase in your property, or they have a pet that had access to inside the property and caused structural damage or frightened neighbor’s children. Also, Agents are obliged to only place someone in a property if the rental is not more than one third of their income. How are owners / agents to find out this info without thorough checks?
      Hide Replies (5)
      • Talon 15 days ago
        Eddy you sound like a very logical and thoughtful person. I like your comments. I just wanted to add that cutting the disadvantaged, disabled and elderly pensioners out of being able to rent a property is not a very nice thing to do. No government payment allows a person to pay only 1/3 in rent and there is no obligation for agents to make decisions on that basis. I am disabled and have rented for 20 years by myself. I have had no complaints or breaches and always had my full bond refunded. Being a good tenant is based on who you are as a person, not how much money you have/earn. All my neighbours who paid rent late were working, none of the ones on centrelink payments went into arrears. And yes I know that is not always the case but it goes to show money is no basis to be making judgements about people and has nothing to do with being responsible.
        Hide Replies (4)
        • Roxanne#1 14 days ago
          Dear Talon, It is the Government's responsibility to provide affordable housing for the disadvantaged, disabled and elderly. Cheers, Roxanne
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          • Talon 14 days ago
            Actually Roxanne society is responsible for looking after it's own people. That means all of us. I would like to think that when our people age that we will look after them. I miss the sense of community that used to exist in Australia.
            Hide Replies (2)
            • Roxanne#1 14 days ago
              Dear Talon, Society is represented by Government and if Government is not willing to support the disadvantaged, disabled or elderly it is up to charity, whether it is from the person's family or a charity organisation or the goodness of their Landlord. But it is from the goodness of the person's heart, not an obligation. I am renting to a female couple under market rent because one of them has cancer and undergoing chemo. That is my decision, not my obligation. Cheers, Roxanne
              Hide reply (1)
              • Talon 14 days ago
                Society is not represented by government at all. We elect people to speak on our behalf but they do not do what we want nor what is fair nor what is in our best interests as a society. So I respectfully disagree. If it were the case that government represented people we would not be having this discussion. Aged care would already be monitored and kept at a humane level, affordable housing would have been dealt with long ago and students would not be attempting to start their careers with masses of crippling HECS debt. Not to mention, the real estate industry would have the Code of Conduct that it had before, tenants who trash properties would be easy to get out, long leases would be offered to good tenants, people could take their pets when they move and property managers would face having their license stripped for bad behaviour. Reforms would not be needed.
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      That's because we are talking about hundreds of thousands of dollars of property and possibly millions. Not a personal or car loan. Looking after a property properly requires effort and expense
    • Roxanne#1 15 days ago
      Dear Cathe, How much was the bank loan you were applying for? I bet it was not the cost of the house you were renting, yet you could burn the place down or not pay the rent leading to loss of the property. Try to see the other side. Cheers, Roxanne
  • Lonsdale 14 days ago
    Whilst I am happy to provide pay slips etc, I am not always happy to provide bank statements, as this is highly personal and private information. Having said that, my real issue is that we have to hand over this information to many real estate agents BEFORE they will even let you look at a property. I strenuously object to this, as there are times when personal information has been handed over on properties that have been viewed and are ultimately unsuitable. Viewings should not be provisional on handing over personal and financial information. This should only be required when an application for a property is submitted.
  • NinaM 21 days ago
    Tenants should prove they can pay the rent. Either bank statement / payslips and proof of good character, 2 independent references that can be checked easily. Landlords have a duty to provide good clean and fully compliant accommodation in exchange.Property managers need to be accountable for serving both the tenant and the landlord. Professional standards should be applied to this service. The tenant is paying good money and so is the landlord.The final choice of a new applicant should be made by the landlord, this would prove the property manager has done their work.
    Hide Replies (11)
    • AverageRenter 16 days ago
      While the RE Agent claims the landlord has the final say how can this be verified by the tenantv when the tenant has no contact with the landlord? Why is it necessary for RE agents to ask your referees what sort of personality you have? Do they not realise that the personal charachter referees will inform tenants about the questions they are asked? If you have given them as a charchter reference they are surely not going to provide negative feedback about you to the RE Agent?
      Hide Replies (10)
      • Therose 16 days ago
        Character references are not used anymore. Landlords need reliable references from agents and up to date documents. There are annoyances on all three sodes but we all hope it comes together at the end of the day.
        Hide Replies (6)
        • Kaz61 15 days ago
          My husband and I recently applied for several properties and each application form required at least three references. Within a few days of submitting the applications we received calls from our friends to let us know that they had been called by each of the PM's asking about our character.
        • Anthony Trudgen 15 days ago
          Why are agent references reliable? They just as opinionated and bias as anyone else.
          Hide Replies (3)
          • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
            Because they have a professional responsibility to be fair and unbiased based on all pertinent facts. If they are not call the Agency Principal and lay a complaint in writing.
            Hide Replies (2)
            • Anthony Trudgen 14 days ago
              Agency Principal? Do you mean the Agents owner/director? They were the problem. If you mean the owner of the rental, tenants don't always get their details and would likely be feed the same bias opinions for the PM already. In the end, the damage is already done by the time you know whats up and time is no longer side to find a new home. Then you got to fake it to make it and that means the references are yet again not legit. better we be done with them.
              Hide reply (1)
              • Claire Thompson 14 days ago
                Sorry but I don't like the sound of what you are saying. It might be interesting to hear the other side of what occurred,
        • AverageRenter 15 days ago
          I beg to differ with you Terose. I only recently moved in to my rental and had to supply the Leasing Agent with names for Character references.
      • Talon 15 days ago
        Usually the agent picks the top 3 candidates for example and forwards those to the owner. So no the owner doesn't really have the choice, they only get to choose from a few people already chosen. It can be a lengthy process though to go through applications so many owners don't want everyone's details. However, all information that is provided to the agent can be passed to the owner. Personal references were always useless, as they are likely friends. Agent references can be just as problematic with bigotry and hatred stemming from the tenant asking for basic maintenance to be done. The only actual truth to be found is in the rent ledger. But really most of the time we just have to take chances on each other.
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Robyn Hartley 15 days ago
          Rent ledger and a drive by of the future tenants current address to see if the place is clean and tidy. Agents can recommend bad tenants so that they do not have to deal with them any more....
          Hide reply (1)
          • Talon 15 days ago
            I love the drive by idea Robyn! I just don't think agents will bother with that since they can't be bothered to give the prospective tenants the courtesy of respect, let alone advising them if their application has been rejected, or keeping appointments for viewings.
  • Vanessachapelle 14 days ago
    I rented a property of a realestate, my rent & water bills were always on timetime & I was there for 2 years. Although my rental history is good I had personal clashes with the real staff when I started asking for things to be repaired. Now they won't tent me another property due to "personal issues" . I live on Russell island & only have limitef real estatesestates. I don't think its fair that they won't let me apply for personal issues! Also having hibi polar,anxiety this is extremely disturbing . I think there should be a clause where real estates can not discriminate people for personality/ personal issues.
  • Becgurski 14 days ago
    Ability to pay , ability to look after the property
  • guyfaulks 15 days ago
    The application forms need to be totally thorough in every aspect, giving as much information as possible to the landlord, after all they will be living in a house that he has invested a lot of money in and wants to see it looked after and treated with respect.
    Hide reply (1)
    • u828576 14 days ago
      In most cases, those who commit offences in rental properties no doubt are the outliners and represent only a small minority. However, I understand and respect you want to protect your business asset and company revenue and avoid creative bad tenants.On the flip side, it is only logical tenants should have the right to similar information regarding the potential contract they are about to engage. The financial viability of the landlord (are they suffering mortgage stress) number of grievances against the property, No of complaints against the real estate from previous tenants, how long the property has been a rental, service history of the property, the age of the appliances, floor plans, is the property disability compliant, crime rate in the area to name a few. Food labelling enables consumers a choice of what to buy based on their values. If the QLD Australian people elect to continue treating housing as a business rather than a fundamental human right, they should be afforded the same level of information to make informed decisions. I am interested to know how other Countries have resolved these landlord and tenant concerns. Have national bodies been established to provide governance and standards, in much the same way as other industry Regulatory Authorities do so currently in Australia? A government body regulating both landlord and tenant information perhaps would alleviate both parties concerns given the housing market is currently viewed as a business.
  • Colly 15 days ago
    Standardise the paperwork across the state. Standidise the looking process across the state. Stop allowing real estates and property the power to completely control people’s lives. Through out these processes. All real eastate staff and property managers should be trained in a strength based framework in working with people. Including tenancy workers, property managers and real Eastgate staff.
  • Anthony Trudgen 18 days ago
    I suggest removing the requirement to provide previous rentals history. The requirement can have detrimental effects on finding a rental while you have no legal blemish to your name. I've had to make up two years of my rental history so I wasn't denied another rental because I stood up for my rights as a tenant. I know plenty of people that don't enforce their rights as tenants for fear of retribution and this is just one of the delivery devices. I don't blame people for not taking tenants on that are know to defend their rights, it make sense. But that's exactly why the chance for this information to be disclosed should be removed.
    Hide Replies (14)
    • Emmadeanne 18 days ago
      Anthony, I would be interested to know what you mean by removing the requirement to provide previous rental history as references from previous property managers and owners are one of the main things that are considered when seeking a new tenant for a rental property. If an applicant has rented in the reasonably recent past we need to have a reference from the previous pm. I have no problems with tenants knowing their rights but owners also have rights and most simply want a tenant who pays rent on time and looks after the property. One important way to find out if this is the case is references from a previous pm or owner.
      Hide Replies (13)
      • Anthony Trudgen 16 days ago
        My point is pervious rental references can be bias and are open to abuse. People have grudges, it's life, so I don't want those opinions to unfairly deny a roof over someone's head. I would want only facts to be shared, income and a check on unredeemed breaches within a few years period would surely be sufficient
      • Veritas 16 days ago
        Emma, there is a huge power imbalance, tenants and applicants are incredibly vulnerable to exploitation and abuse. If there was transparency, kind of like Uber, you could see how tenants rated a PM and vice versa. One way street at the moment,
        Hide reply (1)
        • Carol456 16 days ago
          Yes you are right about the power imbalance I have even had agents tell me to fill in an application or they won’t show the property, I don’t know why I should have to go to all the trouble of filling in application when I may not like the property
      • Wallygrub 16 days ago
        I agree totally, Emmadeanne, as a landlord the best information is previous rental history and that is all I need to make my decision on who to rent out my property. That information will supersede most other financial information and is more reliable than how big his bank account is or his weekly wage, etc. But it is totally different for a first time prospective Tennant. That is when I would require at least some information on ability to pay and what the prospective Tennants likelyhood is of looking after the place and paying rent on time. So I would definitely need a lot more information for the first time prospective Tennant than somwho has a long rental history with no black marks and dood recommendations from previous pm’s.
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Anthony Trudgen 15 days ago
          So if either PM from your last two rentals say anything bad about you then that's it. So not only do tenants have to put up with horrible PMs when they live under their management, they then must indure their lies about you to other prospective lessors.Can you not see how references can be abused?
          Hide reply (1)
          • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
            If the references are that bad it must have been a pretty bad dispute. You may need to check with Fair Trading if you feel you are being unjustly disadvantaged or seek legal advice
      • Grover 15 days ago
        If you go for a job interview you will be required to provide references. Why would you think it is unreasonable to supply a reference when you are moving into a property that could be worth a considerable amount, eg $500.ooo paying $500 a week rent which equates to a bond of just $2000. Don't you think the property owner is entitled to enquire just who and what sort of people will be living in it. If I was to rent out a property to anyone and later found they had some form regarding non payment of rent or property damage and I ended up out of pocket I would not be impressed.
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Anthony Trudgen 15 days ago
          For starters the references given to employers don't have to be your last two employers and can be individuals from the place you worked. You can have the best opinions about you.Secondly , if you need to know if someone didn't fix a breach in their lease, wouldn't a database that verified that the issue be enough?
        • Talon 15 days ago
          That's why there is a rent ledger. You'd know that before approving the person. You'd also know if their bond had been refunded. Asking someone's opinion that you don't know, who has a hatred for someone else based on their own personal issues, is not a reliable reference. Facts are.
      • Talon 15 days ago
        That's not true Emma. What the previous PM's opinion (that's all it is) is of the character of the tenant means nothing in many cases. You'd need to know if the PM was doing their job first, if maintenance was being done and if the property was even clean when they let it to that tenant. THEN their opinion may be reliable. In most cases these things have not happened. When you have a PM who makes a fist at you and threatens to make sure "you will NEVER rent again!!", as a tenant what do you do? That is the result of asking for a window screen to be fixed after storm damage..after waiting more than 3 months. If the owner genuinely just wants to know if the tenant pays rent on time and looks after the place..that is completely covered in the rent ledger and bond refund.
        Hide Replies (3)
        • Emmadeanne 15 days ago
          Talon I hate to hear of situations like this as it gets all property managers a bad name. I believe I am a good and fair property manager I would never behave in the way your pm did. You would be within your rights to report it to the principal of the agency, whether or not anything will be done I do not know. Yes the owner does want to know if the tenant pays rent and cares for the property and the rental ledger covers the rental payments but quite often a tenant is applying for a new home before vacating their current one so the bond has not been refunded and even if it has not been refunded in full it does not mean the tenants did not take care of the place there might have been mutual agreement between the tenant, pm and owner that part of the bond be used for a repair that the tenant did not want to arrange due to time constraints. I have had this happen a few times with very good tenants. Accidents happen in any home so repairs are needed. The fact that their bond was not refunded in full was no reflection on how they cared for their home.
          Hide Replies (2)
          • Talon 15 days ago
            The bond could not be used for a repair if the tenant was not involved in the damage. I may be missing something there, but that is what the legislation says. Bond is for damage and issues caused by the tenant.
            Hide reply (1)
            • Emmadeanne 15 days ago
              Talon, You are right. I might not have expressed myself very clearly here. Yes the bond can only be used for the repair of damage caused by the tenant. In the situations I referred to the tenants had caused the damage. In one instance there was a large hole in a garage wall caused by the tenants' car door just days before they vacated and left to move to another part of the state. They simply did not have time to arrange repairs so asked me to retain part of their bond to pay for the repairs. I arranged a tradie to repair the then emailed a bond refund form to the tenants noting the cost of the repairs. They signed and the rest of their bond was refunded. They were brilliant tenants and the hole in the wall was caused accidentally it was in no way any reflection of how they cared for the property and had they stayed I don't doubt they would have had the wall repaired. Damage happens sometimes no matter how careful a tenant is but if they caused the damage they are still responsible for the cost of repairs.
  • BecA 15 days ago
    I think a regulated standardized form ensures everyone preparing to rent knows the expectation and can find the information. I find it frustrating to have to find different information for different applications, it can be time consuming and challenging.
  • dseed 16 days ago
    A standard form across the industry would make it easier all round. Also agree that some agents do become vindictive when you stand up for your rights. We had to move due to an issue with the property manager not liking the fact that we stood up for our rights and so she would not renew our lease, by the way we had been there for 4 years, house looked after and rent paid. House then sat vacant for 10 weeks and then rent dropped by $40 per week to get another tenant. Bet the owners didn't know what was going on? The owner lost thousands of dollars due to this agents vendetta
    Hide Replies (3)
    • Carol456 16 days ago
      Very simalar situation happened to me with a very vindictive agent because I stood up for my rights. After moving found out owner was never contacted by agent and didn’t know a thing even though agent had told me they contacted owner.
      Hide reply (1)
      • dseed 15 days ago
        It is very frustrating, needs to be some way that owners can make sure that the agent is doing their job properly as well. The owner and the tenant are the ones that loose in this situation as the agent gets a new letting fee when the re let the property but the tenant has moving costs etc. and the owner looses rent while the agent locates a new tenant
    • Talon 15 days ago
      Same happened to me, multiple times. I learned not to ask for anything to be fixed which is frustrating and sometimes expensive.
  • matt88 15 days ago
    I agree standardized application forms should be mandated. There are standardised RTA forms for everything other aspect of rentals, why should applications be any different? This just leaves them open to abuse.Under no circumstances should bank statements be required, it's not unreasonable to ask for proof of income but requiring any period of bank statements is an invasion of privacy. I don't think personal references should be required either. As a person suffering from mental illness, I have no friends and a strained relationship with family. Who do I use as a personal reference? Personal references are almost always highly biased in the prospective tenants favor anyway. A reference from a previous property manager/ landlord is a lot more relevant.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Talon 15 days ago
      I had no personal references for the same reason, no professional ones either. I thought bugger it I'll just be honest so I put on my application that I have no life of any sort and so do not know anyone to get a reference from. Then I included a cover letter explaining a little more. Was accepted. It wasn't that which bothered me though, it was wondering if my past property manager who threatened me for asking for maintenance to be done would be honest or continue her campaign of lies. What is ok for some is devastating for others.
  • Angelika Ziehrl 15 days ago
    As a tenant you are asked to provide a large amount of information. I agree with other comments that proof of income is OK, but bank statements are not. Also, what does a tenant know about the real estate other than they want rent on time, every nook of the house clean on the day they turn up every 3 months. Do we know if they have a good track record? What about the owner who sees all the tenants personal information? A tenant knows nothing about them - are they intending to sell soon? Are they sincere in doing reasonable repairs? It's a luck of the draw. When the agent says that the owner does not want to do the repairs how do I know that is true? I would like to know more about whom I am renting from.
    Hide Replies (4)
    • Fast Eddy 15 days ago
      Hi if you rent thru an agency owners don’t have access to your private info as mentioned in your post.
      Hide Replies (3)
      • Angelika Ziehrl 15 days ago
        I have always been told by the agency that the applications are vetted by the agency first, then a short list is forwarded to the owner?
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Robyn Hartley 15 days ago
          This has never happened in my experience as an owner
        • Talon 15 days ago
          Owners have the right to be provided with the full application from the tenant. The agreement after all, is between the tenant and owner, not the agent. It is most common that the agent will shortlist 3 or so people and forward information about them to the owner. I think in many cases it's more of a summary though and not the actual documentation. But as said, owners have the right to all documentation provided in an application and some do request it.
  • WinstonWatson 15 days ago
    I dont earn a regular wage and sometimes earn less than 400 a week but I have never never failed to pay rent in the 20+ years I have rented. Income or bank statement does not = rent will be paid. I deserve to have a good home even when I dont earn much. My paying rent should be all the proof needed
    Hide reply (1)
    • Talon 15 days ago
      Exactly right! How much a person earns/has is not relevant to how reliable they are. 20 years of renting myself as well, rent always on time or for the last 6 years in advance, disabled and on low income. Some of us are great tenants because we know how to budget.
  • LBPM 15 days ago
    What a property manager of landlord needs to know from an application is - they are who they say they are - so whatever ID we need to verify this, we should be able to get. 2. That the applicant is able to meet the financial obligations on the tenancy and 3. That the applicant is able to care for the property within the current legislation requirements. Personal references are not worth the paper they are written on and therefore, we can only rely on previous agency/landlord references.
    Hide Replies (5)
    • kwil 15 days ago
      And yet most rental applications still ask for personal references. If they're not needed (and no, none of my friends ever get a call) why ask for names and numbers? This is why a standard approach should be adopted. And yes, I agree with the property manager reference - BUT it has to be recognised that vindictive or incompetent property managers have all the power in this circumstance. That stops a lot of tenants from taking action when agencies do the wrong thing as a bad reference means you won't get a new place.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
        If you think the Agent is being unprofessional immediately ask for the Principal of the office and make your concerns known in writing as well. The issue is often fixed by doing that,
        Hide reply (1)
        • Talon 15 days ago
          Many times that can get the whole agency offside Claire. Then they band against you to make it so impossible to live there that you have to move. Otherwise it's the usual "Not my problem" response.
    • WinstonWatson 15 days ago
      There should no long winded application forms or a new form needed for each new property. Applicants should provide basic ID like a drivers licence. Rent payment and no property neglect can be proven in practice. There needs to be a easy and quick system to remove or add a person from the tenancy without being charged $50 for a change and the everpresent hassle of updating the paperwork. The current system makes shared housing a bog hassle with people moving in and out of a house common
      Hide reply (1)
      • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
        Sounds like your Owner needs a new Agent!
  • Darryl White 17 days ago
    As an owner I want to know that the tenant can afford to pay the rent, and that they are capable of looking after my property. If they have a proven record of being able to do this it helps give me more security. I have a mortgage and maintenance expenses so I need to be sure that the rent gets paid on time and that the tenants aren't going to cause damage. I think the tenant needs to be asked questions like employment, income, past rental history, rent paid on time.if questions like these aren't able to be asked, why would anyone want to take on the very real risk of renting property. There are enough risks as an owner already.
    Hide Replies (7)
    • Kpsubs 16 days ago
      Darryl,When you took out the mortgage, did you have to show the bank that you were capable of paying the mortgage? From your statement, it seems not and thst is why there is a fear pushed out to the tenant. You have a mortgage whether you can afford it or not, that is not to be considered for legislation. It is important to ensure that tenants are not drawn into this fear that they will damage, obscond and deliver misery in your life. If you start with fear, then you will attract tenants will be deliver what you fear most. Most risks can be mitigated with insurance. Something a tenant can’t take out in case of a fearsome landlord. I think there is another theme that won’t be addressed here and that is this state of the rental market. Too many landlords are in the market who are ill equipped or naive about what property rental is really about - providing homes for people.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Roxanne#1 15 days ago
        Dear Kpsubs, When you take out a mortgage they ask for a lot more than when you are renting! And the Bank has access to ALL your accounts at the bank. And they ask for more. Not all risks can be covered by insurance, and there is a deductible. Owners should not have to make up the difference when Tenants do not pay the rent or damages the property. Try telling a Hotel they should give you a room even though you can't afford to pay and will have wild parties. Renting is a contract and if the Tenant does not fulfill his or her obligations it is not the Owner who is ill-equipped.
    • Therose 16 days ago
      As tenants we object to agents collecting our personal past eg bank savings history, what our weekly budget consists of. The majority of tenants wouldn't rent if they could own. If I could get a loan for our own home I would have however at 62yrs of age not possible.
    • AverageRenter 15 days ago
      Lets be real here Darryl White. The reason why property owners rent properties is to have someone else pay them off for them, not out of the goodness of their heart or they feel they are doing a justice for renters.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Mark and Robyn 15 days ago
        Removed by moderator.
    • Talon 15 days ago
      This is all covered with the rent ledger and bond refund, things that are already provided. Unfortunately agents often don't put much weight in those and just want a glowing reference from the nasty property manager who was managing the run down old roach infested dive the tenant had to live in before. This is reality for many people. I have seen over and over, PM's approving applicants who were clearly unsuitable for the property and then caused disturbance to the neighbours upsetting the whole community..and not paying rent on time. If agents and owners relied more on facts they may have a better tenancy outcome.
    • Mark and Robyn 15 days ago
      Why anyone would want to have a rental house or unit ,put up with maintenance insurance rates ,bad tenants etc is beyond me and the tougher the government makes it for landlords the less there will be.
  • LouLou 15 days ago
    A standardized application form would provide consistency in information to be submitted to the property manager or owner such as proof of income which could be a payslip or if self employed an invoice. All property listings could be centralised into one database held either by the Department of housing and public works or the RTA, rather like applying for a job online through sites such as seek.The user creates an account meaning that there are two portals, one for property managers and one for tenants.The standardized form is held on the tenants portal. The tenant looks through the database of properties, finds one or two that they would like to apply for and completes the online application form and hits the submit button.The application form asks for basic personal information, references and proof of employment or self employment. The way in which personal information is held, used must comply with the Privacy Act 1988.The saved application form can then be submitted at any time by the account holder for any property advertised on the database.Feedback is important: a mechanism to rate/review the property, such as the condition of the property and timeframe for response by the property manager and feedback to the proposed tenant on why their application was not successful would be helpful.Also, the property listing should identify any repairs, maintenance, pest management undertaken, cleanliness of the property and whether lawns have been maintained during vacancy.Properties should undergo a health check as part of the eligibility to be listed on the database, such as materials containing asbestos, the safety of the structure against the building code of Australia, pest management report, repairs and maintenance report.Pets: why should potential tenants be penalised for having pets?? This may be creating a huge divide and possible homelessness of potential tenants who do own pets. What ever is decided on the new process going forward, there needs to be transparency from all parties involved.
    Hide Replies (7)
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      Fortunately we do not live in a totalitarian regime. We live in a free market economy and a democracy. Tenants have a lot more rights than landlords and they are living in an investment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Mutual respect is a good idea. So are manners. With all the above criteria you have mentioned and all that regulation no one would even be bothered to own an investment property. For heavens sake go and have a look, If you don't like it don't apply!
      Hide Replies (6)
      • LouLou 15 days ago
        Your entitled to your opinion, however do you rent, own an investment property or an agent?
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
          I am an Agent of 28 years experience, a property owner, and I have rented several times in the past in Queensland, Interstate and overseas. Both my adult children have rented multiple times and none of us have had any significant problems because: 1) We document carefully & take photos, 2) We pay our rent on time 3) We leave the property in clean and tidy condition following the cleaning guidelines as per RTA website and Tenancy Agreement provisions 4) We never damage the property and if an accident occurs we get it fixed properly at our expense 5) We are always polite and respectful whilst being aware of our rights as well as our responsibilities.
          Hide reply (1)
          • LouLou 15 days ago
            It would seem you are indicating that myself and other tenants do not pay rent on time, leave the property in a clean and tidy condition, do not damage property or are not polite and respectful? The comments people are contributing are not a personal attack on your or anyone's values and beliefs. There is obviously a problem with the application process which is why the Department have asked the public for their opinions on how to improve or streamline the process so that everyone concerned is treated fairly, without prejudice and is comfortable with the passing on of personal and private information without any assurance by the agent that it will not reflect negatively on their application or passed onto other agents or subsiduary businesses owned by the agent. Private information should be destroyed once the application process is complete and should not be kept on file.
      • LouLou 15 days ago
        This page is about asking for ideas on how to improve renting in QLD. Did you not read the title and description above? Seems that your attitude leaves a lot to be desired.
        Hide Replies (2)
        • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
          Interestingly I was thinking the same about you its called projection
          Hide reply (1)
          • LouLou 15 days ago
            Actually, I have offered sound and valid points towards effecting change, however it would appear that agents are only interested in defending their position without providing mechanisms for continuous improvement.
  • Liscou 16 days ago
    I do not agree with handing over bank statements. Proof of employment is through your payslips and we can hand over rental receipts or reports from previous agents. It is none of the RE agents nor property owners business what else you pay for, there are plenty of other ways to prove you can pay your rent.
    Hide Replies (15)
    • Goldn1 16 days ago
      Totally agree, I find it very invasive handing over bank statements etc. I wish landlords would share as much as we do as I'm sure many don't wish to spend a dime on their places even thou they have the money it's horrible they know everything. When we rented out our property I refused to let the real estate agent take or even ask for this with applications. We had 2 sets of families over a 6 year period and never ever had a issue and even wrote a letter to us thru the agent thanking us for being human it was pricesless
      Hide Replies (6)
      • Liscou 16 days ago
        Yes I have binned applications that ask for bank statements. It's none of their business and as someone previously pointed out, we don't know who else sees them and potential is there for identity theft if not handled securely.
        Hide Replies (5)
        • Carol456 16 days ago
          Yes it is totally invasive to hand over bank statements.
          Hide Replies (4)
          • Therose 16 days ago
            Wish we knew that but don't you get refused accommodation? Hoping that this current rental will see us out.
            Hide Replies (3)
            • Liscou 16 days ago
              I have never been refused a rental but I have refused to hand over an application if they want bank statements, there are plenty of rentals where I live. Someone mentioned other privacy issues and one that bothers me is taking photos and yes I was told these are not seen by anyone else but when we were leaving a tenancy and went onto the website to see how it had been listed, price etc, there were all the photos of our furniture and belongings as well as the address of the listing. Have to wonder if anyone has been broken into once property has been listed in this way.
              Hide Replies (2)
              • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
                That is illegal unless you gave your written consent!
                Hide reply (1)
                • Liscou 15 days ago
                  I didn't know that, would have made a complaint if I had known. I didn't think it was right and certainly was not happy about it.
    • kwil 15 days ago
      I'm self-employed and knew my application would be more difficult because I don't have pay slips. But even with tax information from the previous year (showing my income) and a letter from my accountant I was still forced to hand over bank statements. I have several for my business, then personal day to day and savings accounts. They wanted it all. Which I think is a gross invasion of privacy.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • LBPM 15 days ago
        Kwil, I hear you as a small business owner - but what else can you do?
        Hide reply (1)
        • kwil 15 days ago
          How about a tax return/BAS statement, letter from the accountant, or summary of income... all of these things are less invasive than records of every single transaction I have made in the past year. And let's face it, the real estate agent is interested in my ability to pay rent, not how many times I paid to see a doctor, what I pay for petrol or spend on going to the gym... but they now have all of that information and you have to wonder how that is protected, stored and/or destroyed.
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      Bank statements would normally only be asked for if you are self employed, a business or are not currently working
    • LBPM 15 days ago
      There are ways of showing ability to pay - if insufficient alternate means, then why can't agents ask for bank statements - we don't need to know everything so black out the critical information - but if we can see that you earn $x and spend most on them on the pokies and pubs and buy rubbish and at the end of every week or at very regular intervals the balance is in the red....well - that is enough to show us that you do not have the ability to meet the financial obligation on the Tenancy.
      Hide reply (1)
      • LouLou 15 days ago
        Would you give over your financial information such as bank statements if asked?
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      Fine if you are an employee. What about self employed, companies or tenants with poor payment histories?
    • Roxanne#1 15 days ago
      Dear Liscou, If you don't like the investigation involved with renting you sure would not like what is required to buy a property! Good choice for you to rent. Cheers, Roxanne
  • Rosalyne 15 days ago
    It should all be standard, using the same information
  • Pasmore 15 days ago
    Tenant should be told up front if there is a problem with the property - I rented a property with a leaking garage. The person who showed me the property said I couldn't inspect the garage because the power was off, which I later found out was rubbish. Even though they knew I was going to use the garage for storage they didn't tell me about the problem and I lost $5000 worth of property I had stored there. Property managers/owners need to be very upfront with things like this so tenants can make an informed decision.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      If this is true you have grounds for legal action against the Agent
  • RayJamieson 15 days ago
    The application forms need to be standard across the industry - no exceptions!
  • LBPM 15 days ago
    Application process regulation is dangerous if it is not well weighted for both landlord/agent and tenants.
  • Harper18 15 days ago
    Rental references and payslips to show they are 1. Good tenants and 2. Can afford the property Applications are so intensive it takes forever to fill them out. I don’t understand why we need to supply 100 points of ID to prove we’re good tenants. Shouldn’t just a payslip, 1 form of ID and the rental reference be enough. I don’t like having to provide someone I’ve never met with my bank statements and utility bills. Also, more agencies need to have online applications such as 1form. Paper applications and handing them in or even having to scan and email are an outdated process in 2018. I do agree the application process should be regulated and standard across all agencies - each agency always has a different process and require different documents. If it was standard it would be so less time consuming to apply.
  • cdzn 15 days ago
    It's reasonable to provide information that is directly related to the application. ie proof of your ablity to pay the rent (bank statements, pay slips, accountant's statement) but not 'all of the above'. If pay slips are provided, bank statements should not be required. Requiring information not directly related to the application, such as car registrations, should be outlawed.Applications need to be more regulated to control abuses, and restore balance of power. There needs to be safeguards for the community. For example, requiring that proof of ability to pay the rent be permitted by means other than just pay slips.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      Car registration may be required where parking is restricted such as unit blocks. It is also a way to locate absconding tenants who have damaged a property or stolen contents and may be a requirement from the Agents Insurer.
  • Stuart Liebmann 15 days ago
    Totally agree. A tenant has control of an asset that often costs 20 times the amount they are paying in rent. If the tenant leaves then the bond paid barely covers cleaning with little consideration for repairs.
  • cdzn 15 days ago
    Many applications are extremely invasive of privacy. I understand agents and property managers feel the need to ensure the rent will be paid, and the property looked after, but where are the protections against overly invasive questions, or identity theft? (eg. how do I know the agents files are secure against hacking?). If my previous tenancy was long (eg over 5 years), the agent should have no right to ask for further details on previous tenancies. Agents should not be entitled to ask questions such as 'where did you hear about this property?' -- that's just market research and irrelevant to the application. If I'm self-employed, a single proof of ability to pay rent should suffice, not an ATO return AND 2 creditor references AND accountants details.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Claire Thompson 15 days ago
      Depends on the value of the property, I expect.
  • ratbag 15 days ago
    Standardised application forms would be great. A great deal of time can be spent filling in forms for different agencies, with most of them requiring different information. One agency wanted us both to supply them with 3 months worth of bank statements, along with other proof of income. Quite frankly that is invasive and none of their damned business what I spend my income on. I redacted all the "you do not need to know" info. Not surprisingly they rejected our application as quickly as they received it.
    Hide reply (1)
    • kwil 15 days ago
      We had to use 1 form for our latest application. Half the attachments weren't sent to the agency and then they still requested a bunch of other stuff from us, despite the crazy invasive requirements from 1 form. I get they need to check out the tenants, but a standard of what is acceptable and one standard set of requirements would be so much better.
  • lifetimerenter 15 days ago
    Previous rental history and current income plus a visual of the tenant/s to assess their character should be ample sufficient to go on when renting a property, I honestly wonder how some PM's even think they are capable of doing the job as they have no idea how to read a person and make a judgement call, you should have this ability if you are a PM, the prospective tenant may have a clean rental record and a job and still be a tenant from hell, then it is up to "other's", too make them move on, when their lifestyle (drugs, party animals, loud speech and music, violence,adults and kids with no respect for neighbour's, funny how, if they have any of these issue's, they have most of them) turns your's to garbage.
  • Suzannah Mellon 15 days ago
    Yes a standard form would b good one that can be printed out and filled in prior to the showing.
  • jt91 15 days ago
    I think that Qld needs an approved form for rental applications, that must be strictly used by all property managers and owners (i.e. this shouldn't be a case where real estate companies can make their own form and it's accepted if they include what is required in an approved form with a raft of other excessive requirements).The current information required by some real estate companies is too excessive. Having previously worked in a role where I conducted credit checks for customers, I'm perplexed by the amount of documentation required in some applications I've come across. In all cases, the documentation exceeded 100 points of identification, it's strange that I need less IDs to get a passport/driver's licence or a loan etc. It's also a privacy concern because I imagine that the real estate companies are responsible for the storage of the ID documents I have to submit. I've also had the instance (luckily only once, and I think it was a NSW based real estate company - l've heard their horror stories about applying for inner city units there) where an application essentially wanted me to sacrifice my first-born to apply. Amongst many requirements, the application wanted a signed reference from both my employer and my current property manager (even though it also wanted a copy of the rent ledger, which would sufficiently establish that I've always paid rent on time?). The property manager provided a copy of the ledger but didn't want to write a reference, they just advised that they were happy to provide their number and provide a reference over the phone. It would have been crazy to have been rejected if my past property manager didn't want to provide a written reference, which I've never been asked for since with subsequent applications.To substantiate the above, my past email notes that the application company was tApp (Trading Reference Australia Pty Ltd ABN 72 098 231 219) and the real estate company notes 'Cohen Handler Queensland' though the real estate company noted on realestate.com at the time was called something different? ("X and Jackson" or something similar). It was for a property available in York St, Nundah about a year ago.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Fast Eddy 15 days ago
      Whether it’s for a job application or a rental property people don’t want to supply written references anymore. It’s the way of the world these days, because of litigation
  • Interested 1 16 days ago
    As a landlord I need to know that a prospective tenant can and will pay the rent on time and not use the lease as toilet paper - that is will not just walk out one day without giving notice or paying out the lease. I need to know that they are going to look after my property and not carry out illegal activities. There should be a rating for tenants like insurance companies give drivers.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Kpsubs 15 days ago
      I appreciatee what you feel you need. No one is going to tell you whether they will use the property for illegal means. I had neighbours who created an Ice kitchen. They were nice guys, paid their rent in advance, no noise. Yet, turned out to be a nightmare with police raids. I think you are wanting to mitigate your risks. Just think what the bank asked you for the mortgage on the property and you can not ask for more even if you feel the NEED!
  • RenterLandlord 15 days ago
    I am a tenant, and a landlord. I think criminal history checks should be shown when applying to rent a property. Real estate agents should conduct proper checks. I keep getting rented to and checks are never conducted with the references I provide. Luckily I am a good tenant but I am shocked as a landlord that this happens.
  • Talon 15 days ago
    Standard applications should definitely be in place, with a rule that no additional information can be requested. When we have rental legislation it is often added to by agents, such as the tenancy agreement which seems to have half a page of special terms added each year and now is massive and very restrictive on tenants, who are also human beings and want a home. Currently the application process is too invasive and too judgemental. Bank statements should NOT be required, due to privacy. Tenants should be required to give proof of income (Centrelink income statement, pay slips, etc), proof of residency and I think it would be reasonable for an agency to do a police check purely for criminal background to further decipher if the applicant is of good character (a home is worth a lot of money after all). Vet records can be provided for pets. References from real estates should be provided in writing, on agency letterhead with their phone number. Some agents make it impossible to be contacted which makes the tenant lose that property. If it's in writing then at least the new agent has it if the previous PM is not contactable. Rent ledgers go a long way to proving the tenant is reliable, and these should be provided to the tenant every 3 months and not when they ask (and sometimes never receive). The tenant can provide for information if they choose, but it should not be required nor able to be requested. Owners do not provide their employment details and bank information to tenants, who have no idea if the property they are moving in to is about to be sold or the loan defaulted on, nor do the new tenants know how maintenance is never done. It should be a more fair process. Owner details should be ON the lease so the tenant can contact them if they need to (emergency maintenance or severe issues with management of property). Applications need to be processed more quickly, not in 2 or 3 weeks time. Agents should be recognising good tenants from their rental history and trying to snag them, not the other way around. There needs to be a regulatory body to oversee holding deposits, perhaps the RTA can hold the deposit so the agent cannot use it to manipulate the tenant into a lease if they get accepted for a better property the next day. Some agents try to completely withhold despite the tenant changing plans within the cooling off period (which could be for many unexpected reasons including work, family and illness).
  • lxtn 16 days ago
    I think that agents should not be able to ask if you've ever lost part or all of your bond, So many agents do this now without justification that it can very unfairly go against you when applying for a rental property. Tenants are vulnerable to powerful agents who can really make it difficult.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Grover 15 days ago
      I have multiple investment property's and whenever a tenant has lost any or part of their bond it is because they did NOT leave the place clean, Eg a house that was only a year old, clean when they left. Not the first time this has happened to me. By the way I have had an agent tell me to do a better cleaning job on a house and have it absolutely SPOTLESS before she would consider placing it on the rental market. Some people do have standards for property owners as well so it is not a one way street here.
  • Felixrising 15 days ago
    The type of information should be regulated. I E max your last rental. And proof of income/ability to pay. Keep it simple.
  • Shell75 15 days ago
    One question....... Why should a renter complete a application form before even inspecting a property. That property may not be suitable for the renters needs.I don't think property managers and owners need a copy of a electrical bill and phone bills. They don't need to know details of what cars are going to be staying at the property.
  • Glenys Irvine 16 days ago
    The questions should be limited & a forms standized. It be illegal for a agency to use information from a previous agency & white out the previous agency’s name & submit it as their report.
  • melanie.paulsen 16 days ago
    The information required is more than anything else you would apply for. Owners/ landlords- would be good to know their history of responding to issues in their properties , how long they take to respond/ repair etc. we moved in to a first time landlord home that was filthy
  • SilentDawn 16 days ago
    Application forms need to be standardised. An eight page application, that then requires 10 supporting documents as well as bank statements, excessive.In this age of data privacy protection, rental applications need to be reviewed to respect the tenant, as well as the owner. As long as I can provide 100 points ID, consent to police check, tenancy history check, can show that I can look after the property and pay the rent.- Agent required more ID documents than QLD transport required to issue photo card.- 5 personal references not family members is excessive.- Current bank balances, even current statements is reasonable, but not 12 months worth of bank statements is excessive.
  • Wallygrub 16 days ago
    As a landlord I need certain information to assist me making a decision about a prospective Tennant. The main information is usually collected by my property manager and I usually get the recommendations from them. Sometthere is a choice of good tenants and other times it’s a matter of picking the best of a bad bunch. By that I mean the prospective Tennant may only have very minamal information that is useful or may even have a bad record on file. The most important information for me is to do with past rental history. Knowing a persons income is less relevant if they have a good rental history and the same goes for personal references from employers or other people. The most important information is past history. If there is no history then I think it is reasonable to provide information in regards to financial situation and at least one or two personal referees to get a chance to get into a rental market to start with, otherwise there maybe others that will get priority over them. So having said that I would like access to personal information I can see how that can be misused or perhaps be a little daunting but there is a need for certain information to make informed decisions. Perhaps personal information may need better legal protection but it needs to be available especially for first time renters.
  • Lynnie 16 days ago
    All the usual stuff they proficate now, maybe if full bonds are returned, agents seem to be suggesting " Oh we the water the one days rent out of the bond" No never do that pay up front get the whole bond back because it is a record of good tenancy. References no one called mine ? The usual ID income assets etc.Not more regulation thru forms more accountability for agents and owners. Anti- discrimination regulations should be observed naturally.
  • Johan9 16 days ago
    Information about the landlord and how he/she manage their properties should be available to tenants. There are risks both ways and as a good tenant I follow the lease to the letter. But this is where it ends as a landlord/property manager can bend the rules to their liking.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Therose 16 days ago
      Here here. I'm luckier this time now however in the past have had unforgiving and unreliable landlords who refuse to fix anything. We have an A1 credit rating for renting, agents are really happy with our caring attitude towards cleanliness maintenance payments on time and always 2wks in advance. This has been the case for 19 + years. We also have many friends who have rental homes and aren't always able to have tenants like us and wonder why those tenants always get homes but destroy the property!!
  • Mark7 20 days ago
    Property managers need to know tenants will meet their obligations (includes paying rent and looking after the property). 3 years on databases for serious breaches is not enough, should be 7 years. Tenancy records should link with credit reporting. The lessor is too often a creditor, so credit information is necessary. In returrn, credit providers can make better lending decision based on rental history.
    Hide Replies (8)
    • Cleocattra 20 days ago
      That’ll be the day I show my credit report as part of a tenancy application. It’s clean as a whistle but it’ll never be shown. The application process at present is stringent enough - there’s pay slips and other ways to prove income (and a full bank statement showing expenditure and balance is NOT one of them), personal references, tenant ledgers, checking with past RE agents and tenancy database checks not to mention proof of ID. For most tenants that’s already more than enough.
      Hide Replies (5)
      • Emmadeanne 19 days ago
        Cleocattra, I must admit I have not agreed with you on many of your posts but on this one I do. As long as the prospective tenant can prove their identity and show they can pay the rent by proof of income as well as references from previous PMs or owners then this is usually sufficient. I also do a TICA check on all applicants but as required I do let them know in writing that I will be doing this. I feel that credit checks are a step too far. I know of many people who would forgo making a payment for a non essential item rather than risk losing their home so some tenants could have a less than glowing credit rating but never have missed a rental payment. Nor does a credit rating, good or otherwise, show that the tenant will care for the property. References from previous PMs or owners are a far better indicator of this.
        Hide Replies (3)
        • Cleocattra 18 days ago
          I wouldn’t expect you to agree; I’m a tenant and you’re a property manager. But thanks anyway for your seal of approval on at least one of my posts. You’ve made my day.
          Hide Replies (2)
          • ChristineA 17 days ago
            Sarcasm, nice and so helpful too.
            Hide reply (1)
            • Cleocattra 17 days ago
              Damn - I mistakenly hit the agree button. Sarcasm to counteract patronising.
      • lorrainedalby2018 16 days ago
        I totally agree. I’m a landlord and I ask for payslips or if prospective tenant is on centrelink I request monthly income slip. I need to know if they can afford the rent. My son and daughter rent and they have both been asked for bank statements. My son has a business and RE asked for business profit and loss sheet. He told them no and was told house wasn’t available to him. My daughter has six children they have there own home but house not big enough so they rent larger home they get rejected because of the number of kids for a 5 or 6 bedroom home who do they think will rent if not a large family. I don’t know if anything further is required certainly not bank statements or verifying employment that is invasive. I’ve even stopped references as I have found it’s friends or past landlords telling lies so tenant will move on.
    • Anthony Trudgen 18 days ago
      7 years is a long time. Remember we are talking about roofs over people's heads, something everyone needs. This would just add to homelessness, stress on government housing and buffing the market for slum lords. same could be said linking credit reporting.
    • Antman 16 days ago
      Credit rating <> Capacity to currently pay. A Rental rating is fair. A rental history sufficient. Some people pay all their rent and have entered into bankruptcy, yet have been the best tenants. If a tenant is using credit to pay for rent then that is VERY different to a tenant paying from pay income from a debit account;
  • Margaret List 16 days ago
    Proof of Employment through Pay slips or recommendations from Employer and Reference from previous Real Estate/Rental properties. Bank Statements should not be required. Standard Application Forms that are presently used seem in order to me - no personal invasion of privacy.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Nippy 16 days ago
      Sometimes if your income is below 33 percent having money in your bank account shows to the owner you can afford the extra as you are currently saving that amount of money
  • HaileyBradley 16 days ago
    We had one real estate insist on bank statments, pay slips and a letter from our manager/supervisor from work (to prove current employment) to verify our ability to pay the rent which I've never encountered before. I completely understand that property managers need to be certain you can afford to rent but i found doing all 3 was excessive. This RE even tried to ring my partner's manager to verify his salary details. My partner is a Custodial Officer. You can't just ring up the prison and ask if so and so gets paid x amount and expect to be given answers. The RE knew what my partner did for a job, they had various proof of income but still had to ring up and try to talk to a manager...at a maximum security prison . At that point i revoked our application.
  • Carol456 16 days ago
    Property Managers treat you like second class citizens and really are very patronizing most of the time. The photos on the web are way out of date and half the time look nothing like the advertised photos. Also now that I am retired and on a pension very few agents take bond loans and finding a suitable place that is affordable is just about impossible. I also find agents don’t communicate very well as when you finally sign a lease there is always extra rules on the lease that have never been discussed and having time to look over lease before parting with any money would be great as well. I also find agents taking photos of your personal stuff each time they do inspections is an invasion of privacy even though they say they won’t be used is not true.
  • mary.jane 16 days ago
    Being an owner, we need to know any rental history available, as well as any breaches or other problems that have occurred with applicants. Unfortunately, we were kept in the dark with some information of our first tenants, that was to lead to disagreements and problems with the first agency we put our property with.
  • joannetoa 16 days ago
    As a tenant I've seen a rental application where I had to list all my expenses. I found this offensive, a breach of privacy and did not apply for that property.
  • Antman 16 days ago
    I dont understand why we dont have a rental rating and lifetime money down for rent. If you have paid $850 /week for 3 years, and are going for a $560/week rental, surely that capacity goes for you. If you do not have a rental history, then secure income should be considered. I also think sometimes there are too many questions - especially for sole traders etc. If you have a strong past history - use that then references then references.
  • Nikky66 16 days ago
    Private landlords need access to data base. There is no way to vet tenants privately and alot of landlords despise agents for the same reason tenants do.Reasonable questions for landlords to ask areNumber of tenants and ages.Employment and income status Rental history and references from previous lessorsPet informationThats it. Anything more than that is intrusive in my opinion
  • Jim101 16 days ago
    When a property is advertised it must state the lease term available and once you are accepted and asked to sign a lease they must not be allowed to shorten the term below that advertised or stated on your application form...happened to me 12mths became 6mths!!
  • Casey11-80 16 days ago
    I would like to see access to standardised digital application (or application docs) that can be processed from or through the RTA and provided to agents as needed. As a tenant, it increases time in each and every application which is disruptive to work and life in general and stress when searching for a properties, particularly in areas where rentals are in high demand.As a landord, I don’t need to know anyone’s personal history. I just need to know they are responsible, willpay rent on time and adhere to there rental requirements e.g. maintain property as required.
  • Shannonponting 16 days ago
    It would be helpful if the property manager gave you a bit more of a reason why an application was unsuccessful? It feels like "it was just the owner's decision" is a bit of a cop out and pretty unhelpful for future applications. I agree there should be a standard form because filling out application after application takes forever. I also don't really see the point of asking for character referees, because of course everyone just puts down someone who'll say only good things.
  • irrelevant 16 days ago
    Standardised application form - all the way! Tenants can print out numerous copies of their app to bring to each inspection. Everyone wins.
  • Laura Jade 16 days ago
    Application requirements - 100 points ID, minimum 3 years residential history, rent no more than 30% of total weekly income.
  • Rosanna Cimino 16 days ago
    I think one standard application form would be easier which could be used for different real estates on different properties and some personal questions should not be asked, like your marital status, or where you were born or other names you have been known as.